Image of the Week

Our series examining an Image of the Week from the photographic files, by Kevin Warstadt, Digital Program Specialist.

Snake in arid environment. Date unknown.

This week’s image of the week comes from a folder titled “Animals.” Pictured is what appears to be a western diamondback rattlesnake.

The western diamondback is a venomous rattlesnake that inhabits the southwestern United States and northern Mexico. It is one of the deadliest snakes in North America, responsible for the most fatalities by snake bite in Mexico.

The Timber Rattlesnake is the only venomous snake species native to New Hampshire. It is considered endangered by the state.

See more photos of animals in the Dartmouth photographic files.

Sources

http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/wildlife/profiles/timber-rattlesnake.html

http://www.reptilesmagazine.com/Snakes/Top-10-Venomous-North-American-Snakes/

 

On This Day

Our series highlighting a digital collection or item relevant to this day in history, by Monica Erives, Edward Connery Lathem ’51 Digital Library Fellow.

On this day in 1992, President James O. Freedman made an announcement which would drastically change the Dartmouth College Library. At a press conference in the Wren Room of Sanborn House, he announced a gift of $30 million to build “a facility appropriate for the twenty-first century” and to allow the Library to “make its own vision of the future.” A pivotal point in the history – and future – of the College, the gift enabled the construction of Baker’s “companion” library, Berry, which was to combine “the best of traditional collections and service with the unlimited advantages of present and future technology.”

This is just one chapter in the Library’s storied past, from its origins as Eleazar Wheelock’s personal collection to the “precarious” years of the College/University conflict, when the Trustees considered selling library collections to pay legal dues. Much of this history has been documented in The Woodward Succession: A Brief History of the Dartmouth College Library, 1769-2002 made available via the Digital Books Collections.

For an even briefer history, take a look at Baker-Berry: A Library for All Reasons from the Digital Publishing Collection, which was published to celebrate the completion of Berry Library in 2002.

Image of the Week

Our series examining an Image of the Week from the photographic files, by Kevin Warstadt, Digital Program Specialist.

This Image of the Week comes from a folder titled “Occom, Samson.”

The SS Samson Occom was a Liberty Ship produced by the California Shipbuilding Corporation. It was launched August 31, 1943.

Th Liberty Ship was the greatest example of American wartime production in World War II. Over 2700 of these ships were produced in just over 4 years. They were primarily used to ship cargo and saw combat only on rare occasions.

The SS Samson Occom was loaned to Great Britain through the Lend-Lease program and ended its life as The Samarinda. The ship was sold to a private party in 1947 and scrapped in 1967.

Sources

http://shipbuildinghistory.com/merchantships/2libertyships5.htm

http://www.usmm.org/libertyships.html

https://www.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/116liberty_victory_ships/116setting.htm

https://www.uboat.net/allies/merchants/ship/2760.html

https://ww2.eagle.org/content/dam/eagle/publications/2013/WorkhorseOfTheFleet.pdf

On This Day

Our series highlighting a digital collection or item relevant to this day in history, by Monica Erives, Edward Connery Lathem ’51 Digital Library Fellow.

Sixth Earl of Dartmouth arriving in Hanover on Oct. 25, 1904. Main street in background.

On this day in 1904, the Sixth Earl of Dartmouth arrived on the Dartmouth campus. Dartmouth College was named after the Second Earl of Dartmouth for his important early support of the college, contributing the initial £50 for the establishment of the school and helping obtain another £200 gift from the king. Since then the college community has witnessed the occasional Earl of Dartmouth visit. Most recently, the Tenth Earl of Dartmouth in 2009.

College Hall (Collis) crowd at the time of the Sixth Earl of Dartmouth’s visit.

View more images depicting Dartmouth’s early history and connections across the sea in the Photo Files collection.

Dartmouth, Earls of 1st and 2nd

Dartmouth, Earls of 3rd through 9th

Image of the Week

Our series examining an Image of the Week from the photographic files, by Kevin Warstadt, Digital Program Specialist.

Dartmouth’s solar car ca. 1989

This image of the week comes from a folder titled “Solar Car.” Dartmouth’s solar powered car raced in the The American Tour de Sol, based on the Swiss race of the same name, in 1989. Also represented in the race were MIT, the New Hampshire Technical Institute, and two independent teams. The race ran from Montpelier to Cambridge.

The history of solar power goes back further than one would expect. In 1839 Edmond Becquerel created the first photovoltaic cell, which operated on the same basic principles as the modern solar cell. In the late nineteenth century, Aleksandr Stoletov is credited with inventing the first solar cell. Bell Labs began producing solar cells for use in space travel in the 1950s, and invented the first practical silicon solar cell later that decade.

See more images of the solar car in the Dartmouth photographic files.

 

Sources

https://www.upi.com/Archives/1989/05/25/Solar-car-race-a-journey-into-future/7697612072000/
http://www.upi.com/Archives/1989/05/29/Checkered-flag-for-solar-car-race/7599612417600/

Pre-1600 Manuscript Project

Aside

The Digital Production Unit has begun imaging manuscript leaves from Rauner Special Collections in support the work of “manuscriptlink,” a digital humanities project based at the University of South Carolina. We are digitizing all of our pre-1600 manuscript leaves from broken manuscript books. The project is seeking to rebuild the broken manuscripts books from their widely disbursed parts to enhance their research value to the scholarly community. The international collaboration seeks to recover a “lost” medieval library by gathering, aggregating, and describing the dispersed components of dismembered manuscripts, and by presenting digital images of them as virtual codices in a robust interactive online forum.

Many of these manuscripts can be viewed as part of Rauner’s Script to Pixels Collection.

Image of the Week

Our series examining an Image of the Week from the photographic files, by Kevin Warstadt, Digital Program Specialist.

U.S.S. Rogers Blood ca. 1946

Pictured above is an image from a folder titled “U.S.S. Rogers Blood.”

The U.S.S. Rogers Blood was a destroyer escort commissioned in 1945, sponsored by the Blood family. It was reclassified a fast transport in 1945 under the command of Commander John W. Higgins, Jr. The ship’s namesake was First Lieutenant Rogers Blood of Manchester, New Hampshire.

Blood was described as an active member of student life at Manchester Central High School, with involvement in various leadership roles and athletics. He enrolled at Dartmouth in 1940 and enlisted in the Marine Corp Reserve in 1942. He accepted a commission as Second Lieutenant in 1943 and was promoted to first Lieutenant in 1944.

Blood was killed in action on Engebi Island in 1944, leading his platoon in a charge against a fortified enemy position. He received the Silver Star posthumously for his courage in battle.

The U.S.S. Rogers Blood was decommissioned in 1946 and berthed in Green Cove Springs, Florida. It was sold and disposed of in 1961.

See more World War II images in the Dartmouth photographic files.

 

On This Day

Our series highlighting a digital collection or item relevant to this day in history, by Monica Erives, Edward Connery Lathem ’51 Digital Library Fellow.

September 21, 1938 hurricane damage on East Wheelock Street. In the background, Thornton Hall, Dartmouth Hall, and Fayerweather Hall are in view.

On this day in 1938, the Great New England Hurricane made landfall on Long Island. This hurricane, also known as the Long Island Express, was one of the most destructive storms of its kind to hit New England. Few were prepared for the storm due to its high speed and erratic movement. Approximately 600 people were killed and vast swaths of forest were damaged by extreme winds.

Hurricane damage on Main Street in front of College Hall (Collis).

These images show only some of the hurricane damage done to the Dartmouth College campus in 1938. View more photos of the 1938 New England Hurricane by visiting the Dartmouth Photographic Files, a diverse collection of approximately 80,000 photographs related to the Dartmouth College area, dating back to the 1850s.

Sources:

Wikipedia – 1938 New England Hurricane

The 1938 Hurricane along New England’s Coast

Image of the Week

Our series examining an Image of the Week from the photographic files, by Kevin Warstadt, Digital Program Specialist.

This image of the week comes from a folder titled “Watering Trough.” The Hanover trough once sat on the Green across from the Balch Mansion. The Balch Mansion was destroyed in a fire in 1900, after which time the college bought the property and built College Hall (now the Collis Center) upon it. College Hall can be seen in the background of the above image.

The trough had two tiers, one for horses and one for dogs. However, it wasn’t just used for hydration. It was also an important part of a Dartmouth tradition. A dunking in the trough was the punishment for unknowing freshmen who had the misfortune of coming in contact with the senior fence.

The trough was removed from the Green in 1961. It has been re-purposed as a planter that now sits in front of Webster Cottage.

See more photos of the Hanover watering trough in the Dartmouth Photographic files.

Sources

dartgo.org/earlydartmouth_frankbarrett

http://www.dartreview.com/the-terrible-trough/

http://alumni.dartmouth.edu/content/and-we-were-there-seniors-and-alumni-talk-dartmouth-tradition-alumni-appreciation-week

dartgo.org/balch_mansion

On This Day

Our series highlighting a digital collection or item relevant to this day in history, by Monica Erives, Edward Connery Lathem ’51 Digital Library Fellow.

On this day in 1995, Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital (MHMH) was demolished. The Hospital was built in 1893 by Hiram Hitchcock in honor of his late wife, Mary Maynard Hitchcock. It was located to the north of Dartmouth’s campus and emptied just a few years prior to its demolition for relocation to Lebanon, NH. On demolition day, many gathered to hear Dr. James Varnum, President of MHMH, deliver some parting words. An article from the Dartmouth Medicine Magazine (2010) recounts his speech:

“The buildings had been essential, he said, but it was the people inside those buildings who made the hospital such a warm environment. When he returned to the Hanover location just after the move to Lebanon, he found that without those people, the buildings no longer felt so welcoming. ‘The life and spirit had moved to our new facility,’ he said. ‘It was time to move on.'”

Today, if you’re strolling by Maynard parking lot, you can spot a plaque indicating the original site of the hospital on the southeast wall of the Geisel Admissions building.

These images come to us from The Dartmouth College Photo Files, a diverse collection of approximately 80,000 photographs related to Dartmouth College, Hanover, and the surrounding area. Dating back to the 1850s, this collection is the perfect place to explore nearly all aspects of past Dartmouth College Life.  View more MHMH Demolition images in the Photo Files Collection or take a look at the Image of the Week series for more blasts from the past.