Image of the Week

Our series examining an Image of the Week from the photographic files, by Kevin Warstadt, Digital Program Specialist.

Brian C. Fuld in the studio ca 1975

This image of the week comes from a folder named “Radio Dartmouth College 1.”

Dartmouth broadcasting began in the 1920s. The first station used the call letters WDBS, but changed to WDCR in 1958 when it was officially licensed by the FCC. Dartmouth broadcasting began to operate another station, WFRD 99.3 FM, in 1976.

Dartmouth broadcasting is completely managed by students.

For more radio images, see the Dartmouth Photographic Files.

Sources

https://www.webdcr.com/history

 

Image of the Week

Our series examining an Image of the Week from the photographic files, by Kevin Warstadt, Digital Program Specialist.

Show jumping ca 1987

The above image comes from a folder entitled “Equestrian Team.” The Dartmouth Equestrian Team finished the ’17 Fall season in 1st place in the IHSA Zone I, Region 2 standings, out of 10 teams and 30 points ahead of the next highest school.

The domesticated horse is a species of odd-toed ungulate, classified Equus ferus caballus. It was likely domesticated around 3500 BC in Central Asia, later than most other domesticated animals. Since that time, horses have been used for transportation, as work animals, and in warfare.

There is a long history of the horse in sport, with horse racing appearing in the Greek Olympic Games of 664 B.C. and evidence suggesting the practice goes back much further. Dressage, or early forms of it, may be traced back to the writing of Xenophon, but show jumping is a relatively new sport that did not come into prominence until the nineteenth century. Though the automobile has largely replaced the horse as a means of transportation, horse racing and other equestrian sports remain popular in the U.S. and around the world.

For more images of horses go to the Dartmouth Photographic Files.

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~drc/

International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature (2003). “Usage of 17 specific names based on wild species which are pre-dated by or contemporary with those based on domestic animals (Lepidoptera, Osteichthyes, Mammalia): conserved. Opinion 2027 (Case 3010)”. Bull. Zool. Nomencl. 60 (1): 81–84. Archived from the original on 2007-08-21.

http://www.imh.org/exhibits/online/legacy-of-the-horse/what-we-theorize-when-and-where-domestication-occurred/

https://www.libraryindex.com/pages/2186/Animals-in-Sports-ROOTS-ANIMAL-SPORTS.html

http://www.chronofhorse.com/article/xenophon-forefather-dressage

 

Image of the Week

Our series examining an Image of the Week from the photographic files, by Kevin Warstadt, Digital Program Specialist.

Above is an image from a folder entitled “Rugby, Women’s.” The Dartmouth Women’s Rugby team was founded in 1978 and has won eleven Ivy League titles. The team has eleven Sweet Sixteen appearances and three Elite Eight appearances.

See more images of Women’s Rugby team in the Dartmouth Photographic Files.

Information form the Dartmouth Women’s Rugby Facebook page.

 

On This Day

Our series highlighting a digital collection or item relevant to this day in history, by Monica Erives, Edward Connery Lathem ’51 Digital Library Fellow.

On this day in 1992, President James O. Freedman made an announcement which would drastically change the Dartmouth College Library. At a press conference in the Wren Room of Sanborn House, he announced a gift of $30 million to build “a facility appropriate for the twenty-first century” and to allow the Library to “make its own vision of the future.” A pivotal point in the history – and future – of the College, the gift enabled the construction of Baker’s “companion” library, Berry, which was to combine “the best of traditional collections and service with the unlimited advantages of present and future technology.”

This is just one chapter in the Library’s storied past, from its origins as Eleazar Wheelock’s personal collection to the “precarious” years of the College/University conflict, when the Trustees considered selling library collections to pay legal dues. Much of this history has been documented in The Woodward Succession: A Brief History of the Dartmouth College Library, 1769-2002 made available via the Digital Books Collections.

For an even briefer history, take a look at Baker-Berry: A Library for All Reasons from the Digital Publishing Collection, which was published to celebrate the completion of Berry Library in 2002.

Image of the Week

Our series examining an Image of the Week from the photographic files, by Kevin Warstadt, Digital Program Specialist.

This Image of the Week comes from a folder titled “Occom, Samson.”

The SS Samson Occom was a Liberty Ship produced by the California Shipbuilding Corporation. It was launched August 31, 1943.

Th Liberty Ship was the greatest example of American wartime production in World War II. Over 2700 of these ships were produced in just over 4 years. They were primarily used to ship cargo and saw combat only on rare occasions.

The SS Samson Occom was loaned to Great Britain through the Lend-Lease program and ended its life as The Samarinda. The ship was sold to a private party in 1947 and scrapped in 1967.

Sources

http://shipbuildinghistory.com/merchantships/2libertyships5.htm

http://www.usmm.org/libertyships.html

https://www.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/116liberty_victory_ships/116setting.htm

https://www.uboat.net/allies/merchants/ship/2760.html

https://ww2.eagle.org/content/dam/eagle/publications/2013/WorkhorseOfTheFleet.pdf

On This Day

Our series highlighting a digital collection or item relevant to this day in history, by Monica Erives, Edward Connery Lathem ’51 Digital Library Fellow.

Sixth Earl of Dartmouth arriving in Hanover on Oct. 25, 1904. Main street in background.

On this day in 1904, the Sixth Earl of Dartmouth arrived on the Dartmouth campus. Dartmouth College was named after the Second Earl of Dartmouth for his important early support of the college, contributing the initial £50 for the establishment of the school and helping obtain another £200 gift from the king. Since then the college community has witnessed the occasional Earl of Dartmouth visit. Most recently, the Tenth Earl of Dartmouth in 2009.

College Hall (Collis) crowd at the time of the Sixth Earl of Dartmouth’s visit.

View more images depicting Dartmouth’s early history and connections across the sea in the Photo Files collection.

Dartmouth, Earls of 1st and 2nd

Dartmouth, Earls of 3rd through 9th

Image of the Week

Our series examining an Image of the Week from the photographic files, by Kevin Warstadt, Digital Program Specialist.

Dartmouth’s solar car ca. 1989

This image of the week comes from a folder titled “Solar Car.” Dartmouth’s solar powered car raced in the The American Tour de Sol, based on the Swiss race of the same name, in 1989. Also represented in the race were MIT, the New Hampshire Technical Institute, and two independent teams. The race ran from Montpelier to Cambridge.

The history of solar power goes back further than one would expect. In 1839 Edmond Becquerel created the first photovoltaic cell, which operated on the same basic principles as the modern solar cell. In the late nineteenth century, Aleksandr Stoletov is credited with inventing the first solar cell. Bell Labs began producing solar cells for use in space travel in the 1950s, and invented the first practical silicon solar cell later that decade.

See more images of the solar car in the Dartmouth photographic files.

 

Sources

https://www.upi.com/Archives/1989/05/25/Solar-car-race-a-journey-into-future/7697612072000/
http://www.upi.com/Archives/1989/05/29/Checkered-flag-for-solar-car-race/7599612417600/

Pre-1600 Manuscript Project

Aside

The Digital Production Unit has begun imaging manuscript leaves from Rauner Special Collections in support the work of “manuscriptlink,” a digital humanities project based at the University of South Carolina. We are digitizing all of our pre-1600 manuscript leaves from broken manuscript books. The project is seeking to rebuild the broken manuscripts books from their widely disbursed parts to enhance their research value to the scholarly community. The international collaboration seeks to recover a “lost” medieval library by gathering, aggregating, and describing the dispersed components of dismembered manuscripts, and by presenting digital images of them as virtual codices in a robust interactive online forum.

Many of these manuscripts can be viewed as part of Rauner’s Script to Pixels Collection.