Like a huddle on a sports team, teaching huddles are an opportunity for members of a teaching team to regroup and evaluate their teaching strategies. Teaching huddles are rapid-fire problem-solving sessions that take place each week while a course is in session. They are agile, meaning that they respond quickly and flexibly to the evolving needs of a course as it is being taught. Teaching huddles may be appropriate for any course that has more than one person working to help students learn course material. Some examples of teaching huddles include professors co-teaching a course, a professor working with graduate teaching assistants or Learning Fellows, or a professor working with instructional designers.  ...continue reading "Teaching Huddles"

coffeelearn_headerCoffee & Learn is a new series of mini-workshops held at the Arts & Humanities Café in Bartlett 201 every Monday afternoon from 3:00 to 4:00 pm. Members of Dartmouth's Digital Humanities community will discuss technologies for research and teaching, and participants will have plenty of time for guided practice over delicious afternoon cappuccino. Read more for a list of Coffee & Learns that we've organized for the remainder of winter term. ...continue reading "Coffee & Learn"

Adam and Erin presenting on accessibility at ELI 2017At ELI 2017, Instructional Designers Erin DeSilva and Adam Nemeroff represented Team Access at Dartmouth College. Team Access is an inter-departmental group of staff from Classroom Technology, Educational Technology (Instructional Design), and Student Accessibility Services. Together, we work to improve access to learning experiences for all learners. The following is our poser we presented and the resources we frequently consult with through our work.  ...continue reading "Our Poster and Resources: Access First! Igniting a Campus-wide Universal Design Mindset"

This post was crafted in collaboration with Rebecca Taub (Brown University), Petra Bonfert-Taylor,Erin DeSilvaPrudence Merton, and Kes Schroer (Dartmouth).

Students in a group meeting.Group work can take many forms, from short discussions to term-long projects. In our Active Learning Canvas site, we have resources on many activities that could be group based, such as Case Study ApproachCreating a Shared Knowledge BasePeer Instruction, and of course Team-Based Learning...continue reading "Using Student Groups in Your Teaching "

By Adam Nemeroff and Erin DeSilva

The following is a guide for creating materials that are accessible to a variety of students, regardless of accommodation need. ...continue reading "Creating Accessible Materials"

"How can I make my site great?"  (or versions thereof) is one of the most commonly asked questions we receive.

 

Our answer is the following list of questions. We designed it to help you prepare your course according to current "best practices" in student learning and course design.  Each is also grounded in the principles of Universal Design.  You'll notice that there are many items here that you might consider addressing outside of Canvas - that's great too!

Many items include links for you to learn more about each particular topic.  Please also feel free to contact your Instructional Designer to discuss any or all of these items! ...continue reading "Leveling Up Your Course Design Using Canvas"

By Alicia Brandon (Student Accessibility Services) and Adam Nemeroff (Instructional Design)

This post is the first in a series of collaborations between Student Accessibility Services and EdTech where we will explore the role of Universal Design for Instruction (UDI) and its role in creating an inclusive classroom environment. In this first post, we will introduce UDI and its principles, frame definitions for each principle, and provide examples of the principles in use.

UDI is a set of principles meant to address the needs of all learners. A classroom that adopts these principles seeks to not only support the needs of students requiring accommodations, but the needs of all learners to allow them to learn at their best. These principles, introduced by Scott, McGuire, and Shaw (2001), are increasingly being embraced by educators across the nation. ...continue reading "Creating Inclusive Courses with Universal Design"

This summer, we asked some Dartmouth students about their experience as learners using Canvas. Here is what they had to say - watch either the entire 8-minute clip, or even briefer, focused segments.

Dartmouth students on Canvas ( 8:20)

...continue reading "What do students think about Canvas?"

On Friday, August 12, 2016, 55 participants representing 21 different institutions in the northeast gathered at Dartmouth to share experiences, identify best practices, and build community around Canvas as a learning management system and strategy for pedagogical innovation. This was the fourth iteration of the Canvas User Roundtable hosted by the Dartmouth College EdTech team, with the goal of learning from colleagues and creating a local community of practice for institutions at varying stages of Canvas implementation. The agenda was a combination of of pre-planned demonstrations/discussions and unconference-style breakout sessions:

  • Data and Analytics
  • Rubrics
  • User Experience and Course Design
  • Universal Design
  • Accessibility
  • LTI approval and “Hacking”
  • Governance and Leadership
  • Piloting and Evaluation of Canvas
  • Templates and Standardized Course Design

During the event, we also used the Twitter hashtag #CanvasRound16 as a backchannel to capture ideas and generate discussion – which resulted in a lively digital community and conversation.

fourth-canvas-roundtable ...continue reading "4th Annual Canvas Roundtable"

Kes Schroer joined the Dartmouth EdTech group as an instructional designer this month.  We sat down with Kes to find out more about her background and her current work at Dartmouth.  Stop by and visit Kes at EdTech’s location in Baker/Berry library!

Photo credit: Eli Burakian
Photo credit: Eli Burakian

...continue reading "Meet EdTech: Kes Schroer, Instructional Designer"