Dissertation Fellowships Connect New Scholars to Dartmouth

On November 27, 2013 by Grad Forum
Dartmouth dissertation fellowships bring young scholars to campus for yearlong residencies in the humanities. From left, Jessica De La Ossa, from the University of Arizona, is the César Chávez Fellow; Jaira Harrington, from the University of Chicago, is the Thurgood Marshall Fellow; and Kate Beane, from the University of Minnesota, is the Charles A. Eastman Fellow.

Dartmouth dissertation fellowships bring young scholars to campus for yearlong residencies in the humanities. From left, Jessica De La Ossa, from the University of Arizona, is the César Chávez Fellow; Jaira Harrington, from the University of Chicago, is the Thurgood Marshall Fellow; and Kate Beane, from the University of Minnesota, is the Charles A. Eastman Fellow.

This year, Dartmouth is home to three scholars fresh from the graduate programs where they have prepared their doctoral work. They are here to wrap up the final stages of their apprenticeships in academia.

The pre-doctoral fellowships support graduate scholars who have completed all other PhD requirements for a year-long residency at Dartmouth to finish their dissertations with access to the libraries, computing facilities, and faculty.

Kate Beane, from the University of Minnesota, is the Charles A. Eastman Fellow; Jessica De La Ossa, from the University of Arizona, is the César Chávez Fellow; and Jaira Harrington, from the University of Chicago, is the Thurgood Marshall Fellow.

In bringing dissertation fellows to Hanover, says N. Bruce Duthu ’80, the Samson Occom Professor of Native American Studies (NAS) and chair of the NAS Program, Dartmouth accomplishes a number of things. “The primary purpose of the fellowship is to provide the time and support needed for a fellow to complete his or her dissertation. In the process, however, the faculty, along with our students and other colleagues, benefit from the exchange of knowledge and research that the fellows bring to campus.”

Part of that interaction is formal and planned, he says, including “a sponsored colloquium where the fellow presents his or her work.” It also includes informal occasions.  “In a more general sense, the fellowship gives us the opportunity to help support the intellectual development of the next generation of scholars in our field.”

To read more, see Dartmouth Now.

photo by Eli Burakian ’00

 

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