Seen and Unseen: Picturing Race, Gender, and the Enemy in WWI Posters

Seen and Unseen: Picturing Race, Gender, and the Enemy in WWI
Exhibit in Baker Library Main Hall–September 24 to December 19, 2014
Curators’ talk with Winnie Yoe ’14 and Sara Trautz ’15–Friday, October 3, 4:00pm

Seen & Unseen poster

World War I propaganda posters primarily promoted the war, recruited troops, and raised money for the war effort. With these aims, it is not surprising that they did not reflect many aspects of the war effort or many of the people involved. This exhibition examines several of the subjects ignored by these propaganda campaigns. By exploring the five themes of masculinity, women, the enemy, victims, and race, the exhibition draws attention to the disconnect between reality and what is depicted in these posters. To fill in the missing picture, the posters are juxtaposed with other images from World War I. By offering a closer look at messages embedded in World War I posters, this exhibit challenges viewers to think critically and ask questions about images of war.

Seen and Unseen: Picturing Race, Gender, and the Enemy in WWI Posters was organized by Winnie Yoe, Homma Family Intern, and Sara Trautz, Mellon Special Project Intern, at the Hood Museum of Art. They would like to thank the Hood Museum of Art, especially their supervisors Katherine Hart and Amelia Kahl. In addition they would like to thank Dennis Grady of the Dartmouth College Library for the exhibition design; Laura Barrett, Director of Education and Outreach, Dartmouth College Library; Margaret Darrow, Professor of History, for her expertise on World War I; and Bruce Hunter for giving them access to his extensive collection of World War I artifacts. Most of the posters are reproductions of works in the Hood Museum of Art collection.

Baker Library Main Hall: September 24 to December 19, 2014

Made possible by the generous support of the Harrington Gallery Fund

Friday, October 3, 4:00pm
Join Winnie Yoe ’14 and Sara Trautz ’15 for a gallery talk on their installation Seen and Unseen: Picturing Race, Gender, and the Enemy in WWI Posters.

Learn about and explore other exhibits in the Library here: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~library/exhibits/

Pocket Relief

Oh, what a cool little find. While looking for a good map of the White Mountains for our current exhibit, “Corresponding Friendships: Robert Frost’s Letters,” we stumbled on The Pocket Relief Map–Franconia Notch Region (R. D. Woodard, 1930). It is made of pressed plastic, and is just three and a half inches by five inches. The box has a line drawing of the Old Man of the Mountain.

What’s it for?  It is hard to imagine carrying it in your pocket for reference. You couldn’t really pull it out on a  hike and say, “Ah, now I know where I am!” Our guess is that it was just a souvenir for tourists vacationing in the area and it was never carried in anyone’s pocket.

To see it, ask for White Mountains G3741.C18 1930 W6.  The Frost exhibit is on display from now until November 1st in the Class of 1965 Galleries in Rauner.  We found an even better map for that!

100-ish Days of Digital Preservation

Hello, there. It’s been a little over 100 days since I started as Dartmouth College Library’s first Digital Preservation Librarian. I’ve been working closely with staff in many departments to define my role and work out how best to ensure long term access to the Library’s digital content. Here are some of the things that I’ve been up to:

  • Maxed out our master file server space.
  • Learned about awesome projects and connected with colleagues at Digital Preservation 2014.
  • Made some head-way into assessing our e-resource preservation strategies.
  • Used BagItto package 45,000 files totaling 2413 GB for long-term storage (see above re: maxing out server space).
  • Started digging into PREMIS .
  • Learned to harness the power of Twitter for professional research #digipres .
  • Started brainstorming strategies for preserving analog and born-digital a/v content.
  • Dipped my toes into web and database preservation in response to a faculty inquiry.
  • Got really excited about sustainability and digital humanities projects.
Digital Preservation Brainstorming!

 I’m looking forward to my role in the Library continuing to evolve and grow over time. As these and other projects develop, I will tell you all about them here. Stay tuned for the next 100-ish days of Digital Preservation!
Written by Jennifer Mullins

A Daily Diary of the Great War — September 30, 1917

By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1919

“September 30, 1917, Sunday.

Total destruction

Total destruction

Today is Bob’s birthday, I believe. Well, Bob, I’ve got all sorts of presents for you when I get home, May it be soon!

Today we got a call for M s.P again so we left at 8 A.M. and got back at 5:30 P.M. after a disinteresting trip. However, I took some great pictures, –one of a house with a shell hole in the corner of it, and others showing munition bases to batteries in the woods. After they’re printed I’ll show them to you.

Well, folks, I got some might welcome mail tonight, –Mother’s, Sept. 14, Mattie’s Sept. 6 & 13, Wilda, 6 & 14, Muddy Marsh, Sept. 14 and Marje Humphries, Sept. 11; also your song-book Mattie, and the Sunday paper of Sept. 9. Roy Youmans [Dartmouth class of 1920] came back from camp yesterday so the quartette christened the new song-book and extends its heartiest thanks to Sister Mattie. After singing our throats sore, we all went to bed.”

September 30, 1917

September 30, 1917

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to first entry
To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.

A Daily Diary of the Great War — September 29, 1917

By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1919

“September 29, Saturday, Fair.

Chipman_Sept_29_PhotoWas called at 7:00 this morning for Dowie and I had to go to Braine to get some water for the camp. On the way we met a large brown towing car full of American officers who were on their way here to enlist men in the camion [truck] service of the A. F. S. into the camion service of the U. S. Army. When we were coming through the town “en retour” I saw Chet Shaffer. He has joined the army and now is on the captain’s staff car (orderly) Capt. Andrews of the camion service in the U. S. A. He came up to the camp for a few minutes and then after I ate my dinner I went down to the Y. M. C. A. where Capt. Andrews made a speech to all the camioneers. Chet had to drive the cap. over to Compeigne so I saw him for only a few minutes but was glad of the opportunity, believe me. In the P. M. I hung around reading etc. I have started a collection of french books all in the same binding and all classics in French literature which cost only 30¢ apiece so you see I read as much as I can. It is very interesting too. Then too, I am making a collection of all interesting photographs in papers and magazines of places in France that I have seen and am familiar with. Some day, I’ll make a scrap-book.

After supper we played cards but the chef came up on the hill so we had a bull league about the service. You see Andrews in the American Field Service has “balled” everything up so the service is in a very bad management and the French officers are sore at him, and so is the American Army so the French Army doesnt care whether we stay or not, nor does the American Army want to keep the service so you see we’re up in the air. However, I am not worrying as Mr. Marshall who came over on the boat with me has offered me a fine position in the Press & Photographic Division of the U. S. Intelligence Bureau. My job is one in a thousand and I’ll describe it in my next letter to you. It is more important than aviation or artillery and just as important as trench fighting, for I shall have to go into the trenches at certain times for special services. Anyway, don’t tell anyone till you get my next letter in which I’ll describe it fully, tell you how I got it and just how important it is. I feel at last I have earned my reward.”

September 29, 1917 (1 of 2)

September 29, 1917
(1 of 2)

September 29, 1917 (2 of 2)

September 29, 1917
(2 of 2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to first entry
To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.

A Daily Diary of the Great War — September 28, 1917

By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1919

“September 28, Friday, Fair.

Leave for down town / Nothing there anyway

Leave for down town / Nothing there anyway

Today, got up at 7:30 and took Car #6 down to the atelier’s [mechanic shop] for repairs on the carburator and here we wasted all morning. You see these mechanics are poor, I should say, rotten in their work and they are as independent as hermits, so if one wants anything done he must handle them with gloved hands. After dinner Dow and I went down and exchanged the empty bidons or gas cans for full ones, so we were all afternoon on this job lifting those heavy bidons again but it wasn’t so hard this time as we are hardened to the work now. After supper England, Ab S. and I went down town again and listened to the records again. Back to bed soon, however, after a long talk with Ab.”

September 28, 1917 (1 of 2)

September 28, 1917
(1 of 2)

September 28, 1917 (2 of 2)

September 28, 1917
(2 of 2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to first entry To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.

A Daily Diary of the Great War — September 27, 1917

By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1919

“September 27, Thursday, Fair, Cool, Hot and Cool.

Bring up water

Bring up water

The mornings here are very cold now and the heavy mist makes us damp enough but the afternoons are wonderful–and dusty too where we’re on convoy.

This morning we got a call at 4:30 so we left at 5 for M. St.P. to take supplies for a nest of batteries there but it was a very quiet day. The dust was terrible tho’ but we only appreciated our water all the more when we got back. In the afternoon we rested and read, etc. and at night we were some tired so turned in early.”

September 27, 1917

September 27, 1917

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to first entry To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.

A Hebrew Grammar

When John Smith was persuaded by his tutor Samuel Moody to enter Dartmouth College in 1771, he had already spent many years in the study of ancient languages. According to his wife Susan, he “had then read through Homer twice, and all the minor Greek poets he could find.” He entered Dartmouth as a junior and by the following year had “mastered the Hebrew and Chaldee languages as to lay the foundation of his Hebrew and Chaldee Grammars.” After he graduated from Dartmouth in 1773, he became preceptor at Moor’s Charity School for a year before being hired by Dartmouth as a tutor for its students. During that time he worked on a revision of the Hebrew Grammar he had completed in 1772, for the purpose of facilitating “the study of the scriptures of the Old Testament in the original.” He emphasized the fact that his Grammar would be particularly useful for those students of the language who did not have instructors.

Letters of the Alphabet

However, the road to its publication was a long one. At one point in the process Eleazar Wheelock wrote to the trustees in London suggesting that Smith’s Grammar “should be published as a specimen of the progress some of his scholars were making in this new institution.” But, according to Mrs. Smith, “Mr. Smith declined or [had] otherwise given up.”

Perfect Verbs

In 1777, John Smith was appointed Professor of Greek, Latin, Hebrew and Oriental languages at Dartmouth College. He was the first academic hired by Wheelock who, until then, had been doing all of the teaching with the help of the tutors. For his services, Smith was promised one hundred pounds annually, “half in money and the other half … in such necessary articles for a family as wheat, Indian corn, rye, beef, pork, mutton … .” In return Smith had to continue as tutor as well.

Smith stayed connected to the College for the rest of his life. In addition to teaching he served as the pastor for the Church of Christ at Dartmouth College and introduced the practice of giving commencement sermons to the Senior Class on the Sunday before Commencement Day. He also became a trustee in 1788.

Chaldaic Grammar

Smith’s Hebrew Grammar Without Points was finally published by John West in 1803. It was only the second Hebrew Grammar book published in the Unites States and the first using no points.

If you would like to take a look at the original manuscript and its revision ask for MS-1266. To see a printed edition ask for Alumni S652h.

A Daily Diary of the Great War — September 26, 1917

By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1919

“September 26, Wednesday, Fair.

Chipman_Sept_26_PhotoNo orders all day so after cleaning up the car a bit I hung around reading, writing and playing the guitar the Y.M.C.A. man loaned me. The piano is terribly out of tune so he lets me borrow the guitar for my necessary food music. Already I have learned enough chords on it to play or rather accompany the crowd when they sing camp songs. Tonight the chef held another meeting and gave us a talk about the service and also our orders. After supper the bunch of us walked down to the village and hung around the Y.M.C.A. tent listening to the new victrola and real American ragtime records and how it did make us want to get back home again. Came home early and bedded.”

September 26, 1917

September 26, 1917

 

 

 

 

 

 

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to first entry To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.

Clinical Key Interface Update

Clinical Key UpdateAs previously announced, MD Consult has been replaced by Clinical Key.  Clinical Key has all the books and journals formerly in MD Consult, and much more, including over 1,000 books, over 20,000 videos, 2.5 million medical images, 600 journals, and a point-of-care resource called First Consult.

Clinical Key has released a new interface to make searching and browsing easier.

  • The search box on the opening page allows you to designate the type of resource to search: all, books, journals, First Consult, patient education.
  • The table of contents of individual books are presented more clearly with links to the chapters more apparent.
  • There are new “topic pages” with quick information on 1,400+ diseases.
  • Viewing the pdf of a book chapter still requires a personal account, one that you can create for yourself for free by clicking on “login” at the top righ of any screen.  Note that if you already have a login for Elsevier’s ScienceDirect journals you will already be registered and can use that same username and password.

Subscription to Clinical Key was made possible by the Geisel School of Medicine, the Department of Medicine, the Department of Surgery, the Department of Anesthesiology, the Patient Safety Training Center, and contributions from the Departments of Urology and Pediatrics.

Questions?  Contact Biomedical.Libraries.Reference@dartmouth.edu, stop by, or call 603-650-7660.