Library Teaching Quarterly: SP15

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

Open Dartmouth -- Vicky May

Engineering Professor Vicky May shares her course materials openly and is one of the faculty featured in the Open Dartmouth exhibit.

Open Dartmouth
A new exhibit in Berry Main Street, “Open Dartmouth: Research, Data, Code, Ideas,” highlights faculty and researchers at Dartmouth who believe in the importance of sharing their work freely.  This exhibit follows on the heels of the Dartmouth Arts & Sciences faculty’s recent adoption of an open access policy, yet seeks to broaden the notion of what “open” means by highlighting diverse types of scholarly sharing.  The faculty and researchers featured in this exhibit describe in their own words how and why they make their work available on the open web.  By presenting the rationale for why these researchers choose “open,” this exhibit aims to foster critical awareness about access to knowledge in today’s digital environment.

The Open Dartmouth that you currently see is just the beginning of a series of physical exhibits featuring Dartmouth faculty and researchers.  We welcome the opportunity to feature more scholars, whether they be faculty, students, or staff.  So tell us, why do YOU share your work?  Let us know, and we’ll include you in part 2 of “Open Dartmouth”, scheduled for Fall 2015. We welcome recommendations too!  Please contact Jill Baron or Barbara DeFelice.

Nancy Sims

Nancy Sims helped Dartmouth stay one step ahead on copyright issues.  Credit: Marc Barker "Spiral"

Nancy Sims helped Dartmouth stay one step ahead on copyright issues.

Nancy Sims, Copyright Program Librarian at the University of Minnesota Libraries, visited Dartmouth May 11-12 at the invitation of the Library and DCAL. Nancy is “lawyerbrarian”-both a librarian and an attorney–who specializes in copyright, publishing, and technology law. Over her two day visit, Nancy led workshops for library staff, instructional designers, and faculty. She shared her insights on a variety of topics including communicating complex ideas–such as copyright law–to diverse audiences; her research findings on perceived versus actual knowledge of copyright among faculty and librarians; and insights to current and recent court cases pertaining to copyright and higher education. Nancy blogs about copyright and more at http://blog.lib.umn.edu/copyrightlibn/.

Reflective Practice
Reflective PracticeThis summer, DCAL, Educational Technologies, and the Library are partnering on a digital community of practice for faculty to intentionally reflect on individual teaching experiences and connect with colleagues around teaching and learning.

This 3-part program will include: 1) A kickoff session for participating faculty to interact, receive training on the program, and learn more about reflective practice in theory and application, 2) Ongoing engagement in a digital discussion forum and guided reflection throughout the summer ’15 term, and 3) A fall ’15 debrief session in DCAL where members of the community of practice can share their experiences and lessons learned about reflection with colleagues in teh broader teaching and learning community at Dartmouth.

Look for updates here and in DCAL this fall to learn about the faculty’s experiences and to explore how you can incorporate reflective practice into your teaching.

Baker Tower

Photo credit: “Spiral” by Marc Barker in article on Nancy Sims.

Students’ Civil War Research on Display in Rauner Library

Students in Professor Colleen Boggs’s “Civil War Literatures” senior seminar this spring used a wide range of materials held in Rauner Special Collections Library to extend their study of literature beyond poetry and prose of the era. Their work has culminated in three exhibitions currently on display in Rauner.

“‘We love to tie our exhibit spaces to student projects,’ says Special Collections Librarian Jay Satterfield. ‘It offers students a whole new way to present their research. Student-curated exhibits offer a real-world challenge by demanding that students communicate their ideas to the general public in a meaningful way. This is something that many people in the academic world find very difficult but is so essential to what we do.'”

Read the full article, published 6/12/15 by Dartmouth Now.

Open Dartmouth: Research, Data, Code, Ideas

Screen Shot 2015-05-31 at 8.57.31 PMA new exhibit in Berry Main Street, “Open Dartmouth: Research, Data, Code, Ideas,” highlights faculty and researchers at Dartmouth who believe in the importance of sharing their work freely.  This exhibit follows on the heels of the Dartmouth Arts & Sciences faculty’s recent adoption of an open access policy, yet seeks to broaden the notion of what “open” means by highlighting diverse types of scholarly sharing.  The faculty and researchers featured in this exhibit describe in their own words how and why they make their work available on the open web.  By presenting the rationale for why these researchers choose “open,” this exhibit aims to foster critical awareness about access to knowledge in today’s digital environment.

Members of the Education & Outreach committee and the Working Group on Open Access, including Jill Baron, Sarah Scully, Shirley Zhao, Barbara DeFelice, Laura Barrett and Janifer Holt, collaborated on producing this exhibit, soliciting participation from a wide range of campus scholars.  Special thanks goes to Sarah Scully and Dennis Grady for the poster design.

The Open Dartmouth that you currently see is just the beginning of a series of physical exhibits featuring Dartmouth faculty and researchers.  We welcome the opportunity to feature more scholars, whether they be faculty, students, or staff.  So tell us, why do YOU share your work?  Let us know, and we’ll include you in part 2 of “Open Dartmouth”, scheduled for Fall 2015. We welcome recommendations too!  Please contact Jill Baron or Barbara DeFelice.

Laura Braunstein Accepted to Digital Humanities Institute for Mid-Career Librarians

Laura Braunstein, Digital Humanities and English Librarian, has been accepted into the pilot Digital Humanities Institute for Mid-Career Librarians. The Institute will take place at the University of Rochester’s River Campus in mid-July and is funded primarily through a Mellon Foundation Grant. The Institute will advance institutional support for digital humanities by strengthening librarians’ competencies in digital scholarship.

As one of only twenty librarians accepted into the highly competitive program, Laura will participate in a three-day residential experience, followed by one year of online engagement and support. The Institute offers four tracks and Laura will participate, with four other librarians, in the track entitled “Text Encoding, Analysis and Visualization for Humanists.” This track will explore the methods and process of bringing context to digitization and dissemination of texts through text encoding, as well as a range of visualization tools employing that coding: timelines, word clouds, concept maps, geographic maps and more. For more information, visit the Institute’s web site.

Laura’s participation in and skills learned from this institute will enrich the College’s developing programs in the digital humanities and help to support other areas of digital scholarship within the institution.

Inaugural Library Research in the Sciences Award Presented at Wetterhahn Science Symposium

Two hundred thirty-two undergraduates participated in the Wetterhahn Science Symposium, held Thursday, May 28 in the Life Sciences Center, which for the first time included an award presented for Library Research in the Sciences. Two students, Annie Fagan ’15 and Mallory Rutigliano ’17, each won an award, which was presented by Dean of Libraries and Librarian of the College Jeff Horrell.

From The Dartmouth:

“This year, the winner of the symposium’s inaugural Library Research in the Sciences Award was Annie Fagan ’15, whose senior honors thesis was on the tropical dry forest streams across a land-use gradient in Costa Rica. Lora Leligdon, librarian at Kresge Physical Sciences Library and organizer of the award, said that the competition, new this year and judged by a panel of College librarians, was meant to encourage students to reflect on the research and inquiry components of their scientific question.
‘We want to hear about the student’s reflective learning process,’ she said. ‘We want to see them connect their library research with scientific research.'”

Winners of the Library Research Award, as well as the winners of the Wetterhahn/Sigma Xi science poster competition, will have their certificates or posters displayed in Kresge Library for the coming year and will also be featured in brief video interviews where they will talk about their research experience.

Congratulations to all who helped make this award happen, most notably Lora Leligdon, with help and support from others in Kresge Library, the Biomedical and Feldberg Libraries, the Library’s Education & Outreach program, the Library’s administrative office, and the Friends of the Library, who sponsored the cash awards.