How many people does it take to build an institutional repository?: Part Two

DAC_LogoThis is a two part post to introduce you to the Dartmouth Academic Commons and the people involved in its development.

(Read Part One)

Working Groups to ensure DAC’s success

There are multiple working groups that address DAC’s diverse needs.  These groups allow both ITS and Library professionals to combine their knowledge in a structured way.

DAC Education, Outreach, and Public Relations Working Group (DACEOP):

DACEOP outlines and coordinates the broad messages and public relations materials for the multiple, related initiatives and components of the Dartmouth Academic Commons.

Workshops and other teaching opportunities are designed and facilitated by members of the group in collaboration with other working groups associated with DAC.  Library liaisons have a large role in DACEOPs goals as they share important information and updates about DAC and the Dartmouth Faculty Open Access policy with the faculty with whom they collaborate.

Cast of characters involved in promoting DAC:

  • Laura Barrett (Director of Education and Outreach), Baker-Berry Library
  • Barbara DeFelice (Director of the Scholarly Communication Program), Baker-Berry Library
  • Carole Meyers (Project Director), Information Technology Services
  • Library Liaisons—many many from across the Dartmouth disciplines

 Open Dartmouth Working Group (ODWG):

 ODWG works to engage, inform, and educate faculty, students, and administrators at Dartmouth on open access, public access, author rights, and copyright pertaining to publishing.  Topics like open access publication practices and public access requirements can vary greatly across disciplines, which means it is important for this group to include librarians across the Dartmouth College Library system (Kresge, Feldberg, Dana and Matthews-Fuller, and Baker-Berry) who can provide insight on specific questions and needs that arise across academic disciplines. The ODWG engages and educates Dartmouth through exhibits (Open Dartmouth), events (Open Access Week), and a variety of workshops offered in collaboration with the Education, Outreach, and Public Relations Working Group.

Cast of characters involved in supporting open access:

  • Jill Baron (Librarian for Romance Languages & Latin American Studies), Baker-Berry Library
  • Barbara DeFelice (Director of Scholarly Communication Program), Library
  • Jen Green (Scholarly Communication Program, Digital Scholarship Librarian), Library
  • Janifer Holt (Business and Engineering Librarian), Feldberg Library
  • Lora Leligdon (Physical Sciences Librarian), Kresge Library

DAC Workflow Group:

DAC Workflow Group addresses questions about workflow for acquisition and description of content submitted to DAC. DAC will be a system that ingests articles and other forms of scholarly content, and this is the group that makes decisions about what file formats can be accepted, how objects should be described, and the paths that the objects must follow through DAC for accurate processing and presentation. The DAC Workflow Group members will have the expertise to process DAC’s content in its various stages from ingest to preservation. Through their conversations, they can identify and address workflow, metadata, and structural challenges that arise when building a repository.

       Cast of characters addressing DAC workflow:

  • Shaun Akhtar (Metadata Librarian), Library
  • John Bell (Lead Developer), Information Technology Service, Library
  • Barbara DeFelice (Director of Scholarly Communication Program), Library
  • James Fein (Head of Acquisitions and Collection Assessment), Library
  • Jen Green (Scholarly Communication Program, Digital Scholarship Librarian), Library
  • Eliz Kirk (Associate Librarian for Information Services), Library
  • Carole Meyers (Project Director), Information Technology Services
  • Jenny Mullins (Digital Preservation Librarian)
  • Barb Sagraves (Head of Preservation Services), Library
  • Cecilia Tittemore (Head, Cataloging and Metadata Services),Library

Elements Sub-Group:

The Elements Sub-group is responsible for evaluating and making workflow recommendations for Elements, a system that will harvest scholarly citations and feed them into DAC. This work helps them understand how to best integrate the information from Elements into DAC. Elements, like other systems that will connect with DAC, has significant metadata, information management, and processing needs.  The sub-group evaluated those needs and will provide recommendations on who within the Library and ITS system has the expertise to manage Elements’ data and make sure that it interfaces smoothly with DAC. This sub-group may look at other integrating systems as DAC’s development progresses.

Cast of characters evaluating Elements:

  • John Bell (Lead Developer), Information Technology Services
  • James Fein, Head of Acquisitions and Collection Assessment, Library
  • Jen Green (Scholarly Communication Program, Digital Scholarship Librarian), Library
  • Janifer Holt (Business and Engineering Librarian), Feldberg Library
  • Heather Johnson, Research and Education Librarian, Biomedical Libraries
  • Tom Mead, Research and Education Librarian, Biomedical Libraries
  • Carole Meyers (Project Director), Information Technology Services
  • Becky Torrey (Acquisitions Services Supervisor), Library

The critical breadth and depth of expertise that Library and Information Technology staff contribute to bringing dreams of DAC into reality is clear, but DAC’s success is also dependent on the advice and input colleagues across Dartmouth’s campus.  The Council on Libraries, for example, plays an extremely significant role in advising Library and ITS staff on how to work with their faculty peers to utilize the Dartmouth Faculty Open Access Policy and encourage participation in DAC when it is available. The Council on Libraries also provides valuable perspective on the services that DAC should offer to best suit the needs of their peers. DAC and its integrated systems are compelling goals due to the contributions of these Dartmouth experts from across this vibrant institution.  Working to bring DAC to fruition is challenging, exciting, and daunting, but with the support of colleagues, DAC will help Dartmouth be a leader in the future of scholarly communication and access to open information.

Who can you contact about DAC and where can you find more information?  Check out the Scholarly Communication Lab blog for contacts, updates, events, and more.

 

How many people does it take to build an institutional repository?: Part One

DAC_Logo

This is a two part post to introduce you to the Dartmouth Academic Commons and the people involved in its development.

Part One:

The short answer is, many bright, driven, diverse, and collaboratively-minded individuals. The long answer can be best articulated by learning who is involved in building what aspects of Dartmouth’s repository, the Dartmouth Academic Commons (DAC).  The time and expertise of programmers, project managers, directors, librarians, catalogers, digital specialists, collection specialists, and faculty advisors spanning a variety of areas including Information Technology Services, the Dartmouth College Library, and Administrative units across the campus, is critical to an effective, innovative, and networked institutional repository for Dartmouth.

DAC will be a service provided by the Dartmouth College Library (DCL) and Information Technology Services.  It will fulfill the goal of implementing the Dartmouth Faculty Open Access Policy (described below) by making scholarly work available freely to a wider audience. DAC is currently in the design and development phases. It is intended to provide long-term access, storage, and preservation to a range of digital content created by members of the Dartmouth community, such as journal articles, theses and dissertations, and full books. DAC is comprised of a suite of management tools that include collection, description, organization, storage, and preservation of content. The materials deposited in DAC reflects the intellectual output of Dartmouth faculty, researchers, staff, and students, and is educational, scholarly, or research-oriented in nature.

There are many components to designing, structuring, and maintaining an institutional repository and its content, so it’s no wonder that many professionals from many backgrounds need to be involved. Let’s take a closer look at DAC’s components and the types of people that contribute to its creation.

Designing and building DAC:

The Dartmouth Faculty Open Access Policy is the primary reason for Dartmouth’s need for DAC. Proposed by faculty on the Council on the Libraries, such a policy provides a prior license to the final peer reviewed author’s manuscript of journal articles.  Librarians within the Scholarly Communication Program and the Library Administration worked with faculty on drafting a policy that would work best for Dartmouth faculty, while building on practices in other institutions. When the policy was approved by faculty in the Thayer School of Engineering, the Arts and Sciences, and the Geisel School of Medicine, the Dartmouth Library was charged with developing an implementation plan and infrastructure to fulfill the intent of the policy and to respond to long standing requests for such a resource. DAC is being built to be this resource.

Highly skilled programmers and ITS professionals are critical as we build DAC’s technical infrastructure and metadata frameworks.  DAC needs to be a system that will ingest, store, preserve and present content, while adhering to applicable policies and copyright.  As the programmers design and build the system, they will work closely with the Scholarly Communication Program to ensure that the system will follow standard library information management practices and fulfill the purposes for which it is being designed. In other words, design and construction of a system cannot happen in isolation.  Many experts come together to ensure that the system will facilitate a variety of needs for a variety of users.

Cast of characters involved in the Designing and Building a Repository:

  • John Bell (Lead Developer), Information Technology Services
  • Eric Bivona (Senior Programmer), Library
  • Barbara DeFelice (Scholarly Communication Program, Director), Library
  • Carla Galarza (Programmer), Library
  • Jen Green (Scholarly Communication Program, Digital Scholarship Librarian), Library
  • Eliz Kirk (Associate Librarian for Information Services and Project Leader), Library
  • Carole Meyers (Project Director), Information Technology Services

Read part two of How many people does it take to build an institutional repository?” where you will learn about people involved in working groups that ensure DAC’s success.