Student-Led Publishing: Experiential Learning at Dartmouth

Co-Editor-in-Chief Freya Jamison '17 shares World Outlook magazine at the Student Publishing Fair in Baker Main Lobby. (Photo: Stephen Angell)

Co-Editor-in-Chief Freya Jamison ’17 shares World Outlook magazine at the Student Publishing Fair in Baker Main Lobby. (Photo: Stephen Angell)

by Elli Goudzwaard, Learning Initiatives Program Manager

Spirituality, business, fiction, opinion, world politics, art, comedy, science…whatever your interest, it seems, there is a Dartmouth student-led publication for you. This great variety, and the students behind it, were on hand in Baker Main Hall [January 11] at the Student Publishing Fair, an event hosted by the Dartmouth College Library.

The publishing fair is one of several components of the Library’s experiential learning project, “Preparing students to be arbiters of new scholarship: Editing, reviewing, and publishing in the 21st century,” which received support through DCAL’s Experiential Learning Grant. The project is coordinated by Barbara DeFelice, Program Director for Scholarly Communication, Copyright, and Publishing and Laura Barrett, Director of Education & Outreach in the Dartmouth Library.

continue reading….

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds, Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall, January 6-March 31, 2017. Exhibit reception: Wednesday, January 25, 3-4:30pmA new exhibit in the Baker-Berry Library at Dartmouth, Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds, provides a window onto the unique culture and environment of the ‘Roof of the World.’ This exhibit explores the social and religious practices that shape life in Asia’s high mountain environments, explores the political history of the region, and describes some of the encounters between foreigners and Himalayan and Tibetan people over time. The exhibit has been curated by Senior Lecturer Kenneth Bauer and Associate Professor Sienna Craig, who have lived and worked in the region for decades.

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds is enriched by the presence on campus of artist Tenzin Norbu. Born in 1970 in the Himalayan region of Dolpo, Nepal, Norbu studied traditional thangka painting as well as Buddhism from his father, following a lineage of painters that dates back more than 400 years. He is now one of the leading figures in contemporary Tibetan art.  In addition to being a painter and lama (religious and community leader), Norbu is a social entrepreneur, encouraging education and sustainable development in one of Nepal’s most remote districts.

Photo credit: Jens Kirkeby

Photo credit: Jens Kirkeby

Norbu’s repertoire ranges from traditional imagery to unique depictions of daily life, religious practice, and landscape. His work was highlighted in the 1998 film Himalaya (Caravan), the only Nepali film to have been nominated for an Academy Award. Over the past fifteen years, Norbu’s work has been featured in exhibitions in global cities, from Kathmandu and New York City, to Aarhus, Monaco, Lucerne, Paris, Osaka, Tokyo, and Thimphu, Bhutan.

Norbu was one of the artists in Tradition Transformed: Tibetan Artists Respond, an exhibit which originated at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City, and traveled to the HOOD Museum in 2010. Norbu is the illustrator of five children’s books, including Clear Sky, Red Earth: A Himalayan Story, a project on which he collaborated with Professor Sienna Craig (Anthropology) and which has been published in both English and Tibetan.

On January 19 and 25, 2017, Norbu will spend time (9:30am – 2:30pm) painting in the Baker-Berry corridor. A reception for the artist and to celebrate the exhibit will take place on January 25, from 3-4:30pm. Norbu will also be visiting classes and staging a popup exhibit of some of his recent work at the Black Family Arts Center, beginning January 17.