Library Teaching Quarterly: SP17

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

Student-Led Publishing at Dartmouth

Students at the Library's Student Publishing Fair

Students at the Library’s Student Publishing Fair

This winter and spring, Laura Barrett, Director of Education and Outreach, and Barbara DeFelice, Program Director, Scholarly Communication, Copyright, & Publishing, developed a series of innovative programs supporting student-led publishing at Dartmouth, funded by the DCAL experiential learning initiative grant “Preparing students to be arbiters of new scholarship: Editing, reviewing, and publishing in the 21st century.” Student-Led Publishing at Dartmouth is a new program, but it grew out of our on-going explorations of the intersections of information literacy and scholarly communication to benefit Dartmouth students. In January, we kicked off the year with the Student Led Publishing Fair in Baker Main Hall. Dartmouth students representing 10 student-led publications participated by displaying their work, networking with one another, and sharing ideas for how student publishing can be best supported on campus. Through video interviews, we heard in their own words what they learn from engaging in this time-consuming, co-curricular work. Next, about 20 students participated in our spring workshop series in which they explored publishing best practices, copyright and author rights, and editorial policies. They wrapped up their experience by reflecting on all they learned and making plans for improving their publications based on their new knowledge. In April, students from Dartmouth and throughout New England gathered in Baker Library for the 2017 Northeast Student PubCon. The conference featured inspiring talks, workshops led by publishing experts, networking over lunch, and a display of student-led publications from multiple institutions. A video about the conference will be available later this summer. Although we are wrapping up the DCAL ELI grant funded work, the deep learning and program development that resulted from this grant will have a long-lasting impact.

Library Presents Awards for Undergraduate Research, Book Arts

Megan Ong (top) and Emily Burack (bottom), both members of the class of 2017, were winners of the first Undergraduate Thesis Library Research Award

Megan Ong (top) and Emily Burack (bottom), both members of the class of 2017, were winners of the first Undergraduate Thesis Library Research Award

Dartmouth College Library presented its first Undergraduate Thesis Library Research Award at the Senior Honors Thesis Showcase reception on Berry Main Street near the end of spring term. Eligibility for the award is open to any student who writes a senior thesis and is majoring in the humanities, social science, and interdisciplinary fields. This award is analogous to the Library Research Award in the Sciences, which has been awarded at the Wetterhahn Symposium since 2015. Read more about the new thesis research award.

Harriette Yahr '87's entry, 2017/Onward -- A Book Arts Exploration, won Honorable Mention for Community

Harriette Yahr ’87’s entry, 2017/Onward — A Book Arts Exploration, won Honorable Mention for Community

The Book Arts Prize is a juried award given every year in recognition of excellence in the creation of a hand printed and bound book made in the Book Arts Studio by a Dartmouth College undergraduate, graduate, or community member. The cash prizes are made possible through the generosity of the Friends of the Library. View a list of this year’s winning entries, which are currently on display in the Treasure Room cases in Baker Library.

 

#WhatIsCritLib

Participants read and discussed excerpts from the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook

Participants read and discussed excerpts from the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook

From March-May 2017, Jill Baron, on behalf of the Education & Outreach committee, coordinated a three-part series entitled #WhatIsCritLib for library staff at Dartmouth. According to the critlib.org website, “Critlib is short for ‘critical librarianship,’ a movement of library workers dedicated to bringing social justice principles into our work in libraries.” Participants read and discussed excerpts from the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook (2016), and portions of bell hooks’ Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom and Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed. The series aimed to spark a conversation about this movement, its intellectual grounding in Freire, hooks and others, and explore questions related to pedagogical practices, implicit bias, and subverting limitations in the “one-shot” information literacy session. The Library’s Education & Outreach committee has long served as a venue for conversations about teaching research and inquiry, and this series encouraged self-reflection, study, and professional development around classroom practices and encounters with patrons.

 Baker Tower
Contributors: Barbara DeFelice and Laura Barrett (Student-Led Publishing at Dartmouth), Morgan Swan and Sarah M. Smith (Library Presents Awards for Undergraduate Research, Book Arts), and Jill Baron (#WhatIsCritLib).
Editor: Andi Bartelstein

Library Honors Graduating Student Employees

Left to right: Ran Zhuo, Priyanka Sivaramakrishnan, and Dean of Libraries Sue Mehrer discuss Student Library Service Bookplate selections from 2016.

The Student Library Service Bookplate Program honors graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books or other items for the Library’s collections. Each item will include a bookplate acknowledging the student’s selection and recognizing his or her service to the Library. Eligible students have worked at least two terms in a Library department, including the Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology (RWIT).

“The tremendous quality and quantity of assistance that the library’s student workers provide is invaluable. It’s great that we’re able to honor the achievements of those graduating with items that have personal meaning to them,” observed Greg Potter, Research and Information Desk Coordinator. In addition to Potter and Cox, the Bookplate Program committee includes Goodie Corriveau, Wendel Cox, Julie McIntyre, and Tim Wolfe.

“The selections reflect student interests, passions, and humor,” said Cox, Research and Instruction Services (RIS) librarian for History and English. “It is always fascinating to see what they choose.”

For 2017, Dartmouth College Library honors 34 students with selections including works of fiction, musical CDs, and classic works of the cartoon arts to a musical score and a history of makeup.

An exhibit of student honorees and their selections, created by Dennis Grady, Dartmouth College Library Web Support and Graphic Arts Specialist, runs in Baker Main Hall June 9-August 30, 2017. Baker-Berry Library display panels will also present each honoree’s selection.

Visit the Bookplate Program’s webpage for a full listing of student selections for the program.