Time for Teaching: Active Learning and the Modern Librarian

Four librarians examine a book.

Participants in the LALI Archives and Special Collections program design and engage their peers in an active learning session using primary source materials.

Dartmouth’s Librarians Active Learning Institute (LALI) gives librarians time to focus on an increasingly central part of their work – their teaching.

Initially designed for Dartmouth librarians, the institute has expanded in recent years to include more than 20 participants from other institutions each year, as well as a track for special collections librarians and archivists, and a road show that will bring LALI off campus to other universities for the first time this fall. With more than 70 applicants for 23 spots this year, the institute has grown steadily since its inception. Participants now come from all corners of the United States, represent a wide range of academic institutions, and are at a variety of stages in their careers. . . Read more in Elli Goudzwaard’s article, “Time for Teaching: Active Learning and the Modern Librarian.”

Elli is Dartmouth’s Learning Initiatives Program Manager.

Student-Led Publishing: Experiential Learning at Dartmouth

Co-Editor-in-Chief Freya Jamison '17 shares World Outlook magazine at the Student Publishing Fair in Baker Main Lobby. (Photo: Stephen Angell)

Co-Editor-in-Chief Freya Jamison ’17 shares World Outlook magazine at the Student Publishing Fair in Baker Main Lobby. (Photo: Stephen Angell)

by Elli Goudzwaard, Learning Initiatives Program Manager

Spirituality, business, fiction, opinion, world politics, art, comedy, science…whatever your interest, it seems, there is a Dartmouth student-led publication for you. This great variety, and the students behind it, were on hand in Baker Main Hall [January 11] at the Student Publishing Fair, an event hosted by the Dartmouth College Library.

The publishing fair is one of several components of the Library’s experiential learning project, “Preparing students to be arbiters of new scholarship: Editing, reviewing, and publishing in the 21st century,” which received support through DCAL’s Experiential Learning Grant. The project is coordinated by Barbara DeFelice, Program Director for Scholarly Communication, Copyright, and Publishing and Laura Barrett, Director of Education & Outreach in the Dartmouth Library.

continue reading….

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds, Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall, January 6-March 31, 2017. Exhibit reception: Wednesday, January 25, 3-4:30pmA new exhibit in the Baker-Berry Library at Dartmouth, Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds, provides a window onto the unique culture and environment of the ‘Roof of the World.’ This exhibit explores the social and religious practices that shape life in Asia’s high mountain environments, explores the political history of the region, and describes some of the encounters between foreigners and Himalayan and Tibetan people over time. The exhibit has been curated by Senior Lecturer Kenneth Bauer and Associate Professor Sienna Craig, who have lived and worked in the region for decades.

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds is enriched by the presence on campus of artist Tenzin Norbu. Born in 1970 in the Himalayan region of Dolpo, Nepal, Norbu studied traditional thangka painting as well as Buddhism from his father, following a lineage of painters that dates back more than 400 years. He is now one of the leading figures in contemporary Tibetan art.  In addition to being a painter and lama (religious and community leader), Norbu is a social entrepreneur, encouraging education and sustainable development in one of Nepal’s most remote districts.

Photo credit: Jens Kirkeby

Photo credit: Jens Kirkeby

Norbu’s repertoire ranges from traditional imagery to unique depictions of daily life, religious practice, and landscape. His work was highlighted in the 1998 film Himalaya (Caravan), the only Nepali film to have been nominated for an Academy Award. Over the past fifteen years, Norbu’s work has been featured in exhibitions in global cities, from Kathmandu and New York City, to Aarhus, Monaco, Lucerne, Paris, Osaka, Tokyo, and Thimphu, Bhutan.

Norbu was one of the artists in Tradition Transformed: Tibetan Artists Respond, an exhibit which originated at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City, and traveled to the HOOD Museum in 2010. Norbu is the illustrator of five children’s books, including Clear Sky, Red Earth: A Himalayan Story, a project on which he collaborated with Professor Sienna Craig (Anthropology) and which has been published in both English and Tibetan.

On January 19 and 25, 2017, Norbu will spend time (9:30am – 2:30pm) painting in the Baker-Berry corridor. A reception for the artist and to celebrate the exhibit will take place on January 25, from 3-4:30pm. Norbu will also be visiting classes and staging a popup exhibit of some of his recent work at the Black Family Arts Center, beginning January 17.

Library Teaching Quarterly: WI16

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

House Librarians
by Laura Barrett, Director of Education & Outreach

Founders Day -- School House

A student signs the School House book during Founders Day in Baker-Berry Library.

On February 26, Dartmouth’s new housing communities were launched! All current non-graduating students were invited to Founders Day at Baker-Berry Library where they learned their house affiliations, met their house professors, signed the house founders books, and received house scarves and t-shirts. The Library’s role in the new house system runs deeper than being the happy hosts to Founders Day, though. Each of the house communities has its own house librarian. The house librarians will be active members of the house communities and will partner with house professors to enrich the intellectual engagement of the communities.

House Librarians

House Librarians, from L to R: Andi Bartelstein (South House), Ridie Ghezzi (McLaughlin Cluster), Laura Barrett (West House), Jill Baron (East Wheelock House), Katie Harding (School House), Pamela Bagley (North Park House), Caitlin Birch (Allen House)

Biomedical Writer’s Retreat
by Heather Johnson, Research and Education Librarian

Matthews-Fuller Health Sciences Library

Matthews-Fuller Health Sciences Library

The Biomedical Libraries held its first Biomedical Writer’s Retreat January 29-30, 2016. The purpose of the retreat was to support researchers in the process of manuscript preparation; the retreat organizers provided access to writing support, research assistance, and a quiet space to facilitate the writing process. To help participants develop their writing skills, the retreat was structured to balance protected writing time and programming. The program included time with a writing specialist who met individually with each participant to give feedback on a sample from their draft manuscript and to discuss steps to improve logic, clarity, and the writing process. The Biomedical librarians also met with each participant to discuss best practices for literature searching, strategies to increase article and personal research impact, and things to consider when selecting a journal for manuscript submission. Participants also attended three seminars, one of which was led Jen Green and Barbara DeFelice from the Library’s Scholarly Communication, Publishing and Copyright program. A full description of the event and the agenda are available online.

Participants provided positive feedback on all aspects of the retreat, and provided suggestions to improve future iterations of the retreat. The Biomedical Libraries hope to offer a second retreat this summer.

30 Tools for 30 Days
by Katie Harding, Physical Sciences Librarian
30tools30days During winter term, librarians in the Kresge Physical Sciences Library used their blog to share ideas with the Dartmouth community about some exciting tools in scholarly communication. 30 tools for 30 days is a series of blog posts about 30 innovative websites, programs, and apps designed to assist researchers in each of six phases of the research cycle – discovery, analysis, writing, publication, outreach, and assessment.

Kresge librarians Katie Harding, Lora Leligdon, and Jane Quigley identified tools that would be of interest at Dartmouth, and each day posted a synopsis of a new tool. Inspiration for the blog series came from the poster 101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication: The Changing Research Workflow by Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer at Utrecht University. The 30 tools for 30 days posts can be found on the Kresge Physical Sciences Library and Cook Mathematics Collection blog.

DartmouthX: Creation
by Memory Apata, Music Library Specialist

The American Renaissance team on site in Salem, MA.

The American Renaissance team on site in Salem, MA.

The American Renaissance: Classic Literature of the 19th Century, a massive open online course (MOOC) by DartmouthX, opened for students around the world February 16th, 2016. The course is being taught by Professors Jed Dobson and Donald Pease, who also taught a residential version of the course by the same name in the Winter 2016 term. The course explores seven authors from the antebellum period: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Herman Melville, and Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Substantial contributions from Library staff were key components in the development of the MOOC. As the subject specialist for English, Laura Braunstein was a member of the course team from the beginning, consulting on course development, reading selection, and learning goals. Barbara DeFelice, Director of Digital Resources and Scholarly Communication, consulted on rights for secondary reading materials, including essays by the professors. Jay Satterfield, Head of Rauner Special Collections Library, presented in a video titled, “The Plurality of the Whale,” in which he examines different editions of Moby Dick to discuss how the physical manifestation of a text affects the student’s reading of that text. For example, if a book is marketed as a classic, the student often recognizes the book as such and disregards any moments of misunderstanding as a fault of their own rather than a fault of the text. You can read more about the fall 2015 exhibit on the various and diverse editions of Moby Dick in Rauner’s collections. Memory Apata, Music Library Specialist, is the lead teaching assistant for the MOOC and curated an exhibit in the Paddock Music Library called “Music and the Writers of the American Renaissance.” The exhibit runs through April 9th and showcases scores, books, recordings, and video of music inspired by the authors being read in the course.

Baker Tower

A Lot of Good This Daylight’s Gonna Do Us – Cult Cinema from 1968 to 1988: Three Directors

A Lot of Good This Daylight’s Gonna Do Us – Cult Cinema from 1968 to 1988: Three Directors is on display in  Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: January 5 – March 11, 2016. This exhibit examines the work of John Carpenter, David Cronenberg, and George Romero within their larger cultural context. Curator Wesley Benash explains his long-standing interest in the subject:

Cult Film exhibit poster“When I was six years old, by father let me rent Brian De Palma’s film Carrie from the video store.  It scared the hell out of me, but it also spawned a lifelong fascination with the shadowy, macabre underbelly of the cinema.  As a young boy and teenager, I was interested in these films for their sensational elements –violence, gore, and sex.  As I grew up, I began to appreciate them for their sociopolitical elements instead, and I came to understand how less reputable forms of cinema, such as the horror film and exploitation film, frequently had much to say about the societies in which they were produced.  As a student, I have parlayed this interest in cult film into scholarship; the admiration and appreciation I have for these films serves as the backbone of the thesis I am writing in Dartmouth’s Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program.

“The films on display, and others like them, tend to function as cinema’s id, forcing us to acknowledge the ugliness within society and within ourselves; it is for this reason that they repulse so many viewers.  But for those who are willing to open their minds to these films, they are equally audacious and enlightening.

“I obsessively watched the works of John Carpenter, David Cronenberg, and George Romero as a boy and teenager.  I think they are great artists and that their best work stands up to the finest products of Hollywood, Italian neorealism, the French New Wave, or any other period in cinema history.  It is my hope that upon viewing their work, you will feel the same.”

Exhibit curated by Wesley Benash; design by Dennis Grady, Library Education and Outreach.

Library Teaching Quarterly: FA15

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

DartmouthX:  Collaboration
by Pat Fisken, Head of Paddock Music Library, and Memory Apata, Music Library Specialist

"Introduction to Opera" DartmouthX team

“Introduction to Opera” DartmouthX team

Dartmouth has just completed the third of four edX courses this year, continuing to model a team approach to course design in the MOOC (massive open online course) format. Professor of Music Steve Swayne’s course in Italian Opera has been a collaborative project in the best sense, as all team members not only offer their special skills but also support the work of one another through regular team consultation and stepping in when assistance is needed.

Design process for the "Introduction to Opera" DartmouthX course

Design process for the “Introduction to Opera” DartmouthX course

Three library staff members contributed significantly to the OperaX MOOC endeavor.  Pat Fisken (Head of Paddock Music Library) was involved in the initial and ongoing learning objectives and design process, selected and purchased media content, researched and searched for online open source content (images and text), crafted citations, and helped with publicity for the course.  Memory Apata (Music Library Specialist) was hired as the Lead TA for the course and, in addition to being actively engaged with OperaX students through the discussion boards, she was involved in the continuing design process of the course, initiated publicity, and developed and managed social media.  David Bowden (Music Library Specialist) assisted with the digitizing and excerpting of media content to be used within the lecture videos created for the course.The course design process, including contributions from faculty, instructional designers, media specialists, librarians, and students, is summarized in this diagram. Read more about the Library and the opera MOOC here: http://bit.ly/1SLVmiv

 

Active Learning Assessment 
by Heather Johnson, Research and Education Librarian

Johnson poster

Heather Johnson’s poster, “Teaching Strategy Matters: Engagement Impacts Application”

Heather Johnson, Research and Education Librarian at the Biomedical Libraries, recently ran a case study to compare the effectiveness of active learning via a jigsaw activity versus passive instruction via a traditional lecture. To assess memory retention and application, she employed two assessment methods: A Jeopardy activity for memory retention, and a bibliographic analysis for application. She found the results interesting, and she deduced that passive instruction was more effective in terms of activating students’ short-term memory, and that active learning resulted in students being able to produce higher quality bibliographies when scored against a rubric evaluating for the authority of sources. Heather presented the results of the case study at the North Atlantic Health Sciences annual meeting; her poster can be found here: http://bit.ly/1NvbXI1

 

Surrealism and the Spanish Avant-Garde in the Dartmouth College Library 
by Jill Baron, Librarian for Romance Languages and Latin American, Latino/a and Caribbean Studies

Librarian Jill Baron and Profesor José del Pino share their exhibit with students

Librarian Jill Baron and Profesor José del Pino share their exhibit with students

The Fall 2015 exhibit on Berry Main Street, “‘Prepare Your Skeleton for the Air’: Surrealism and the Spanish Avant-Garde in the Dartmouth College Library,” promoted two events at Dartmouth: the Department of Spanish & Portuguese conference “Dalí, Lorca & Buñuel in America” October 15-17, 2015, and the upper-level Spanish course “Dalí, Lorca, and Buñuel: The Secrets of Spanish Surrealism,”  given by Professor José del Pino, who also organized the conference.   Featuring materials from the Dartmouth Library’s collections, the exhibit shows the influence of surrealism on the work of Salvador Dalí (1904-1989), Federico García Lorca (1898-1936), and Luis Buñuel (1900-1983), and other materials related to three of Spain’s most important artistic figures of the 20th century.  Preparations for the exhibit involved Jill Baron, Librarian for Romance Languages and Latin American, Latino/a and Caribbean Studies, Dennis Grady, Exhibits Designer, and Professor del Pino. Contributions were also made by students from the DALI Lab, principally Jake Gaba ‘17, who produced the exhibit’s video montage. Students of SPAN 40 visited the exhibit with Professor del Pino. Being able to see on display some of the books and visual material they were analyzing in depth in the classroom proved to be a remarkable experience in the establishment of productive linkage between the theoretical approach of the course with a selection of pertinent cultural products from which class discussion emanated. More information on the exhibit can be found on the Library’s website: http://bit.ly/1Hb0RXG

 

Carson 61: Active Learning Space Incubator 
by Mike Goudzwaard, Instructional Designer

Carson 61

Yusaku Horiuchi teaching Data Visualization in Carson 61

This past summer, Carson 61 was remodeled from a computer lab to Dartmouth’s newest active learning classroom. Starting this fall term, seven courses met in the Berry Innovator Classroom (Carson 61), using the moveable furniture, team video displays, and collaboration software to explore active learning in the redesigned classroom. The Berry Innovator Classroom is intended to be an “incubator” to try new learning activities, model different classroom design, and inform future classroom renovations at Dartmouth. The redesign of Carson 61 was a collaborative effort including Classroom Technologies, Educational Technologies, DCAL, and the Library.

Baker Tower

Peter Carini publishes on teaching with primary source materials

Peter Carini, College ArchivistWe are pleased to announce that Peter Carini, College Archivist, has published an article in portal: Libraries and the Academy. The article, “Information Literacy for Archives and Special Collections: Defining Outcomes,” builds off of work that Peter has been doing over the past several years to create a framework for teaching with primary source materials. You can read it at: https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/portal_libraries_and_the_academy/portal_pre_print/articles/16.1carini.pdf

Study Breaks in the Library

Keep Calm and Quit Studying

Well, at least for a few minutes.

Good study habits include giving your brain a rest to consolidate all you’ve learned. During finals period this term, the Library is providing many ways for students to take fun and creative study breaks. From November 17-25, look for the study break sign (below) in your favorite library and enjoy some productive distractions from your school work. Throughout the libraries you’ll find jigsaw puzzles, coloring books, Legos, knitting lessons, crossword puzzles, origami, and more. We also will be hosting a special study break guest! Checkers the English bulldog will be in Baker Main Hall from 1-3pm on Friday November 20. Taking a break in order to assemble a puzzle, build a tower, fold paper cranes, or pet a therapy dog surely will lower your stress levels and get your mind off finals for a few minutes, allowing you to go back to your studies with renewed energy and focus.

Dartmouth Library Study Break

 

Photo credits:
Paper Cranes by Mike Baker.
SXSW 2011 Lego Pile – 2 by EgnaroorangE.
Knitting Time by Kate Ware.
How Much Fun? by MTSOfan.
Crossword Puzzle by Nick Olejniczak.

Library Teaching Quarterly: SP15

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

Open Dartmouth -- Vicky May

Engineering Professor Vicky May shares her course materials openly and is one of the faculty featured in the Open Dartmouth exhibit.

Open Dartmouth
A new exhibit in Berry Main Street, “Open Dartmouth: Research, Data, Code, Ideas,” highlights faculty and researchers at Dartmouth who believe in the importance of sharing their work freely.  This exhibit follows on the heels of the Dartmouth Arts & Sciences faculty’s recent adoption of an open access policy, yet seeks to broaden the notion of what “open” means by highlighting diverse types of scholarly sharing.  The faculty and researchers featured in this exhibit describe in their own words how and why they make their work available on the open web.  By presenting the rationale for why these researchers choose “open,” this exhibit aims to foster critical awareness about access to knowledge in today’s digital environment.

The Open Dartmouth that you currently see is just the beginning of a series of physical exhibits featuring Dartmouth faculty and researchers.  We welcome the opportunity to feature more scholars, whether they be faculty, students, or staff.  So tell us, why do YOU share your work?  Let us know, and we’ll include you in part 2 of “Open Dartmouth”, scheduled for Fall 2015. We welcome recommendations too!  Please contact Jill Baron or Barbara DeFelice.

Nancy Sims

Nancy Sims helped Dartmouth stay one step ahead on copyright issues.  Credit: Marc Barker "Spiral"

Nancy Sims helped Dartmouth stay one step ahead on copyright issues.

Nancy Sims, Copyright Program Librarian at the University of Minnesota Libraries, visited Dartmouth May 11-12 at the invitation of the Library and DCAL. Nancy is “lawyerbrarian”-both a librarian and an attorney–who specializes in copyright, publishing, and technology law. Over her two day visit, Nancy led workshops for library staff, instructional designers, and faculty. She shared her insights on a variety of topics including communicating complex ideas–such as copyright law–to diverse audiences; her research findings on perceived versus actual knowledge of copyright among faculty and librarians; and insights to current and recent court cases pertaining to copyright and higher education. Nancy blogs about copyright and more at http://blog.lib.umn.edu/copyrightlibn/.

Reflective Practice
Reflective PracticeThis summer, DCAL, Educational Technologies, and the Library are partnering on a digital community of practice for faculty to intentionally reflect on individual teaching experiences and connect with colleagues around teaching and learning.

This 3-part program will include: 1) A kickoff session for participating faculty to interact, receive training on the program, and learn more about reflective practice in theory and application, 2) Ongoing engagement in a digital discussion forum and guided reflection throughout the summer ’15 term, and 3) A fall ’15 debrief session in DCAL where members of the community of practice can share their experiences and lessons learned about reflection with colleagues in teh broader teaching and learning community at Dartmouth.

Look for updates here and in DCAL this fall to learn about the faculty’s experiences and to explore how you can incorporate reflective practice into your teaching.

Baker Tower

Photo credit: “Spiral” by Marc Barker in article on Nancy Sims.

A Daily Diary of the Great War — Dartmouth Ambulance Units

John Hale Chipman did not compose​ a diary entry on October 31, 1917, and so we’ll catch up with him tomorrow.  For today, you can see what John and some of his fellow Dartmouth servicemen looked like in May of 1917 when they posed for a photo on the steps of Webster Hall before heading overseas. Interestingly, Webster Hall now houses Rauner Special Collections Library where you can find John Hale Chipman’s diary and photograph album containing the image below.

Dartmouth Ambulance Units III & IV, May 1917 (on the steps of Webster Hall)

Dartmouth Ambulance Units III & IV, May 1917 (on the steps of Webster Hall)

Dartmouth Ambulance Units III & IV, May 1917 (photo label)

Dartmouth Ambulance Units III & IV, May 1917 (photo label)

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To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.