Library Teaching Quarterly: SU17

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

DEN Innovation Center

DEN Innovation Center at 4 Currier Place

Feldberg Librarians at DEN

Since the spring of 2016 Feldberg librarians Anne Esler, Karen Sluzenski, and Emily Boyd have been embedded with the Dartmouth Entrepreneurial Network (DEN). The DEN is a co-working space located at 4 Currier Place in Hanover and provides programming and resources for students with entrepreneurial pursuits.

Feldberg Librarians are available for consultations at DEN during “Research Office Hours” and have had many interesting interactions with students, faculty and other community members. Winners of the two-minute pitch competition “The Pitch” receive consultations with librarians in addition to cash prizes and consultations with entrepreneurs. Librarians provide instruction around library resources related to market research and analysis, patents, and more. DEN is a strong program that is continuing to evolve, and the Feldberg librarians have found meaningful ways to engage with their programming and participants. Interactions with Feldberg librarians and the resources available through the library can play a key role in helping students identify potential opportunities and work on their projects.

DCAL logoCourse Design Institute for New Faculty

Sixteen new faculty attended a DCAL-sponsored three-day institute on course design August 15-17. The institute was designed and facilitated by a team from DCAL, Instructional Design, and the Library.

The content was structured using the Understanding by Design (also known as backwards design) model with the theme of universal design woven throughout. There were hands on activities, group activities, lots of discussion, and time for participants to apply what they learned to designing their own course.

Research Data Workshops

The Library’s Research Data Management Interest Group recently completed its second data management workshop series for faculty, staff, and students across campus. Designed to provide support for data driven research on campus, the six-session series explored the research data management lifecycle and provided best practices and hands-on instruction on a variety of data topics and tools.

Data life cycle

The Library and Research Computing offered workshops exploring the different stages of the research data lifecycle.

The series included sessions on data management planning and the DMPTool, data management using Excel, data sharing and preservation, research data storage on campus and beyond, data tidying with OpenRefine and Tableau, and data visualization with R. A collaborative project between the Library and Research Computing, the workshops were led by James Adams (RIS), Pamela Bagley (Biomed), Christian Darabos (ITS), Don Fitzpatrick (Biomed), Katie Harding (Kresge), Lora Leligdon (Kresge), and Jenny Mullins (Preservation).

Offered in both winter and summer terms, the workshops were attended by over 100 participants and received excellent feedback.  Next winter, a revised series will be held at DHMC with special focus on RDM for biomedical and human subjects research.

Workshop materials and future offering can be found on the data management research guide. For more information, or to request a workshop, please contact ResearchDataHelp@groups.dartmouth.edu.

Baker Tower
Contributors: Emily Boyd (Feldberg Librarians at DEN), Pamela Bagley (Course Design Institute for New Faculty), and Lora Leligdon (Research Data Workshops).
Editor: Katie Harding

Library Teaching Quarterly: SP17

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

Student-Led Publishing at Dartmouth

Students at the Library's Student Publishing Fair

Students at the Library’s Student Publishing Fair

This winter and spring, Laura Barrett, Director of Education and Outreach, and Barbara DeFelice, Program Director, Scholarly Communication, Copyright, & Publishing, developed a series of innovative programs supporting student-led publishing at Dartmouth, funded by the DCAL experiential learning initiative grant “Preparing students to be arbiters of new scholarship: Editing, reviewing, and publishing in the 21st century.” Student-Led Publishing at Dartmouth is a new program, but it grew out of our on-going explorations of the intersections of information literacy and scholarly communication to benefit Dartmouth students. In January, we kicked off the year with the Student Led Publishing Fair in Baker Main Hall. Dartmouth students representing 10 student-led publications participated by displaying their work, networking with one another, and sharing ideas for how student publishing can be best supported on campus. Through video interviews, we heard in their own words what they learn from engaging in this time-consuming, co-curricular work. Next, about 20 students participated in our spring workshop series in which they explored publishing best practices, copyright and author rights, and editorial policies. They wrapped up their experience by reflecting on all they learned and making plans for improving their publications based on their new knowledge. In April, students from Dartmouth and throughout New England gathered in Baker Library for the 2017 Northeast Student PubCon. The conference featured inspiring talks, workshops led by publishing experts, networking over lunch, and a display of student-led publications from multiple institutions. A video about the conference will be available later this summer. Although we are wrapping up the DCAL ELI grant funded work, the deep learning and program development that resulted from this grant will have a long-lasting impact.

Library Presents Awards for Undergraduate Research, Book Arts

Megan Ong (top) and Emily Burack (bottom), both members of the class of 2017, were winners of the first Undergraduate Thesis Library Research Award

Megan Ong (top) and Emily Burack (bottom), both members of the class of 2017, were winners of the first Undergraduate Thesis Library Research Award

Dartmouth College Library presented its first Undergraduate Thesis Library Research Award at the Senior Honors Thesis Showcase reception on Berry Main Street near the end of spring term. Eligibility for the award is open to any student who writes a senior thesis and is majoring in the humanities, social science, and interdisciplinary fields. This award is analogous to the Library Research Award in the Sciences, which has been awarded at the Wetterhahn Symposium since 2015. Read more about the new thesis research award.

Harriette Yahr '87's entry, 2017/Onward -- A Book Arts Exploration, won Honorable Mention for Community

Harriette Yahr ’87’s entry, 2017/Onward — A Book Arts Exploration, won Honorable Mention for Community

The Book Arts Prize is a juried award given every year in recognition of excellence in the creation of a hand printed and bound book made in the Book Arts Studio by a Dartmouth College undergraduate, graduate, or community member. The cash prizes are made possible through the generosity of the Friends of the Library. View a list of this year’s winning entries, which are currently on display in the Treasure Room cases in Baker Library.

 

#WhatIsCritLib

Participants read and discussed excerpts from the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook

Participants read and discussed excerpts from the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook

From March-May 2017, Jill Baron, on behalf of the Education & Outreach committee, coordinated a three-part series entitled #WhatIsCritLib for library staff at Dartmouth. According to the critlib.org website, “Critlib is short for ‘critical librarianship,’ a movement of library workers dedicated to bringing social justice principles into our work in libraries.” Participants read and discussed excerpts from the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook (2016), and portions of bell hooks’ Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom and Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed. The series aimed to spark a conversation about this movement, its intellectual grounding in Freire, hooks and others, and explore questions related to pedagogical practices, implicit bias, and subverting limitations in the “one-shot” information literacy session. The Library’s Education & Outreach committee has long served as a venue for conversations about teaching research and inquiry, and this series encouraged self-reflection, study, and professional development around classroom practices and encounters with patrons.

 Baker Tower
Contributors: Barbara DeFelice and Laura Barrett (Student-Led Publishing at Dartmouth), Morgan Swan and Sarah M. Smith (Library Presents Awards for Undergraduate Research, Book Arts), and Jill Baron (#WhatIsCritLib).
Editor: Andi Bartelstein

Library Honors Graduating Student Employees

Left to right: Ran Zhuo, Priyanka Sivaramakrishnan, and Dean of Libraries Sue Mehrer discuss Student Library Service Bookplate selections from 2016.

The Student Library Service Bookplate Program honors graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books or other items for the Library’s collections. Each item will include a bookplate acknowledging the student’s selection and recognizing his or her service to the Library. Eligible students have worked at least two terms in a Library department, including the Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology (RWIT).

“The tremendous quality and quantity of assistance that the library’s student workers provide is invaluable. It’s great that we’re able to honor the achievements of those graduating with items that have personal meaning to them,” observed Greg Potter, Research and Information Desk Coordinator. In addition to Potter and Cox, the Bookplate Program committee includes Goodie Corriveau, Wendel Cox, Julie McIntyre, and Tim Wolfe.

“The selections reflect student interests, passions, and humor,” said Cox, Research and Instruction Services (RIS) librarian for History and English. “It is always fascinating to see what they choose.”

For 2017, Dartmouth College Library honors 34 students with selections including works of fiction, musical CDs, and classic works of the cartoon arts to a musical score and a history of makeup.

An exhibit of student honorees and their selections, created by Dennis Grady, Dartmouth College Library Web Support and Graphic Arts Specialist, runs in Baker Main Hall June 9-August 30, 2017. Baker-Berry Library display panels will also present each honoree’s selection.

Visit the Bookplate Program’s webpage for a full listing of student selections for the program.

Crossword: Library Study Spaces

As the academic year comes to a close and final exams approach, we in the Library are once again encouraging you to get up, stretch, and take regular breaks from studying — it will help you in the long run. To that end, Laura Braunstein, Digital Humanities Librarian, with the assistance of Nate Cardin ’05 and Andrew Kingsley ’16, has created a Dartmouth-themed crossword puzzle to help you de-stress. Look for other study breaks in and around the libraries as well — anywhere you see this sign:  Want the answer key to the puzzle? Find it here.

Exhibit: Protest! at Dartmouth

College campuses have a long history as sites of activism and protest. It’s a truth acknowledged easily enough by today’s students, who have witnessed and in some cases participated in current movements like Black Lives Matter, #NoDAPL, and the Women’s March on Washington, among numerous others. What may be less apparent is the role the college plays when the activism dust settles.

At Dartmouth, the archivists of Rauner Special Collections Library are committed to recording the College’s history—the history of many years ago and the history of yesterday—through primary source documents. Campus activism is a significant part of this history, and one of the most effective ways of capturing it is via first-person narrative.

Oral history is an interview-based approach to documenting the past, centering around an in-depth, recorded conversation between two people: the oral historian and an individual who experienced a particular event, era, or culture firsthand. Because of its emphasis on non-dominant perspectives and marginalized voices, oral history is uniquely situated among history methodologies to document moments of protest and dissent. It is, at its heart, a means of telling stories that might otherwise have gone untold.

This exhibit explores three protest movements in Dartmouth’s past, and a selection of oral history interviews with individuals who experienced them. These interviews and many more are available at Rauner Special Collections Library.

Exhibit curated by Caitlin Birch, Digital Collections and Oral History Archivist, and designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: May 1 – July  30, 2017

Shackleton’s Endurance Expedition: A crewman’s view

Twenty men standing on an icy island with thick snowsuit on.

“Elephant Island Men”

Yesterday, one hundred years ago, the crew of the Endurance was rescued by their leader, Ernest Shackleton. More than four months had passed since he departed Elephant Island aboard the James Caird with five of their crewmates. George Marston, the expedition’s artist, and Frank Hurley, the photographer, were the first to spot the small steam tug Yelcho, a Chilean naval vessel that was lent to Shackleton for his return to Antarctic waters.

In their excitement to see the ship, the remaining crew members tore through the door and walls of their makeshift shelter. Shackleton’s approach from the tug to shore in a small boat was greeted with ragged and weak cheers from the crew, who began to question him before the bow of the boat could touch sand. Within an hour or so of Shackleton’s landing, the entire crew had been transported to the tug and were on their way back to civilization.

Not a single man was lost, although Orde-Lee was almost left behind. He had remained behind at the campsite to show Shackleton around, but realized that Shackleton had no intention of touring the site only after the last boat had shoved off from shore. After a frantic dash down the beach, Orde-Lees hurled himself headlong into the boat and labeled himself “the last man to leave the accursed spot.”

It seems fitting that the last man to leave the island also should be the last to speak here about the ordeal. In his diary entry for August 30th, 1916, Orde-Lees gives praise to Shackleton, saying that he “at the greatest peril had undertaken a journey of unprecedented magnitude with the most utterly inadequate equipment in order to bring succor to his men marooned on an Antarctic island, a debt that we can never repay him except by demanding that he shall receive the honours due to all heroes who at their own great personal risk save the lives of those for whom they are responsible. All honour then to this truly brave man.”

Previous entry  |  Go to introduction

Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916. To see them, come to Rauner and ask to see MSS-185 or Stefansson G850 1914 .O7 1997 during normal hours of operation.  An exhibit on Shackleton’s Antarctic explorations will be on display in Rauner from July 1-September 2, 2016.

Shackleton’s Endurance Expedition: A crewman’s view

By Thomas Orde-Lees, Quartermaster

“August 1916, 23.

No change in pack or weather.

Certain members are exhibiting obvious concerns about the present food shortage and strange to say now that there really is a shortage the imperturbable pessimists are apparently quite unconcerned and certainly are not saying anything in the nature of “We told you so.” It is not unusual that pessimism and equanimity are counterparts.

Three boats sailing on icy ocean

“Endurance under full sail” – courtesy of Shackleton Endurance Photography

The manner in which the aforesaid members exhibit their fears is in trying to overcome them assuming that the pessimists are now thoroughly scared and therefore making mocking remarks such as “Now we shall all starve” and “We shall have to eat the one who dies first” and so on, which has actually occurred before now when people have been in only very slightly worse straits than we are now. There’s many a true word said in jest. To a close observer there are many other indications in the way that the fatuous optimists shout loudly to each other all manner of such remarks about the food supply question as if to keep their spirits up by the cheery loudness of their voices in much the same way psych-ologically as Chinese walking along a road at night shout loudly to each other to keep off evil spirits in other words fear by mutual encouragement.

Of course the probability is that we have ample to support us until the pack clears off again, for it has now been in for a week and the longest previous spell has been 13 days only, but when it does clear we shall have no reserve left and, should we be based again within a few days for a more we should be in a bad way.

I had gone round the foot of Penguin Hill and had reached the top in order to give a had with the rope, but as I was immediately afterwards required down on the ice foot I had the pleasure of being lowered over the precipice on the end of the rope, and subsequently ascended by the same means.

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to introduction

One hundred years ago this August, Ernest Shackleton rescued his crew after the failure of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. Rauner holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916.” These entries are a selection from the diary of the expedition’s quartermaster Thomas Orde-Lees.

Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916. To see them, come to Rauner and ask to see MSS-185 or Stefansson G850 1914 .O7 1997 during normal hours of operation.  An exhibit on Shackleton’s Antarctic explorations will be on display in Rauner from July 1-September 2, 2016.

Shackleton’s Endurance Expedition: A crewman’s view

By Thomas Orde-Lees, Quartermaster

“July 1916, 25.

Mild and damp. West wind and snow.

We had quite an exciting incident today. A large pregnant female seal drifted quite close in on an ice-slab in West Bay at a place where there is a good ice-foot over the rocks but where Penguin Hill rises in an abrupt precipice. Wild came along with his little gun but failed to make his usual fine shooting and although he shot it three times in the head he did no kill it. As he had only three cartridges with him he sent Holness back tot he hut for some more.

“The James Caird” – courtesy of Shackleton Endurance Photography

To reach the hut it was necessary to go right round the foot of Penguin Hill a distance of some 300 yards over a difficult rocky path. Whilst Holness was away the seal so far recovered itself that it got its head and shoulder over the edge of the little floe and was about to dive when Holness arrived. It was an anxious moment for fear we might lose this valuable quantity of food. Wild then successfully dispatched it and it was decided to cut it up where it lay as soon as the floe drifted in close enough to gain access to it, and to haul it up the precipice by rope.

I had gone round the foot of Penguin Hill and had reached the top in order to give a had with the rope, but as I was immediately afterwards required down on the ice foot I had the pleasure of being lowered over the precipice on the end of the rope, and subsequently ascended by the same means.

The seal was cut up into four pieces and hauled up and the fully developed foetus which had only about two months to go was hauled up complete. We also got two penguins.”

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to introduction

One hundred years ago this August, Ernest Shackleton rescued his crew after the failure of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. Rauner holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916.” These entries are a selection from the diary of the expedition’s quartermaster Thomas Orde-Lees.

Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916. To see them, come to Rauner and ask to see MSS-185 or Stefansson G850 1914 .O7 1997 during normal hours of operation.  An exhibit on Shackleton’s Antarctic explorations will be on display in Rauner from July 1-September 2, 2016.

Shackleton’s Endurance Expedition: A crewman’s view

By Thomas Orde-Lees, Quartermaster

“July 1915, 19.

A moderate easterly blizzard confines us to our bags.

Both bays are full of close big lumpy pack.

On days like this we talk and talk. The principal topic is always food, good solid boiled suet puddings being generally voted as the things best worth living for, then apple and black currant puddings with cream, and then how new cake. I suppose it sounds beastly greedy to write like this but we are always in deadly earnest about it and

“The Night Watchman” – courtesy of Shackleton Endurance Photography

get quite heated over arguments as to whether muffins are more filling than crumpets. One has the sort of feeling that if a genie were to suddenly appear and offer us muffins or crumpets some idiot might go and say crumpets. I am a muffineer and know that the muffin is incomparably better food value that the crumpet. “Conspue”(?) the crumpet advocates!

We so seldom mention the war that it is hardly worth referring to it. I think we are all a little ashamed of having run away from it now that we find ourselves in this position of forced inertia, I know I am, and am most anxious to get back in time to do my bit. Most, though by no means all, of us think it must by over by now. I am one of those who think the contrary. If it is over it must have ended in a draw and Brittain could never tolerate that. Wordie is the best debater on this subject and sometimes gives us very interesting information as to pre-war conditions in Germany. For the rest, discussions on processes described in the Encyclopaedia, how things are done and made and semi-scientific talk fills the bill.

No poor penguins today.

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to introduction

One hundred years ago this August, Ernest Shackleton rescued his crew after the failure of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. Rauner holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916.” These entries are a selection from the diary of the expedition’s quartermaster Thomas Orde-Lees.

Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916. To see them, come to Rauner and ask to see MSS-185 or Stefansson G850 1914 .O7 1997 during normal hours of operation.  An exhibit on Shackleton’s Antarctic explorations will be on display in Rauner from July 1-September 2, 2016.

Shackleton’s Endurance Expedition: A crewman’s view

By Thomas Orde-Lees, Quartermaster

“June 1915, 19.

It is still mild but overcast again. A big swell bids fair to disperse the enveloping pack; open-water leads are increasing.

The nut-food sugar gamble is still rankling. I cannot help feeling I bear Wild a grudge and he no doubt feels contemptuous of me, even so it is better that we should give our emotions some rein than vegetate in mental torpor. As a matter of fact, Macklin agrees with me that we are none of us quite normal mentally owing to privation and improper nourishment.

“Tom Crean Husky pups” – courtesy of Shackleton Endurance Photography

I feel sure that had we been in possession of sufficient alcohol to make it a “swopable” commodity and had some members made a corner in it they would have revelled in their shrewdness and a reinstatement of rights would have been the last thing that they would have tolerated, but after all who am I that I should point the finger.

I find that my diary of impersonal impartiality is lately becoming inconveniently egoistic to the elimination of the more general affairs that really do matter, but I dare say the personal side of the case in the case of even only one person may have its uses.

I have another little bone to pick with Wild. Some weeks ago, as previously stated, in order no doubt to allay any uneasiness as to our future food supply Wild stated that we had ample meat to last us until the end of August. To anyone capable of simple calculation it was obvious that this was an over estimate and one could not help thinking that perhaps it was a case of “the wish being father of the thought”, at any rate since then we have killed 300 penguins and 5 seals, and as far as I can estimate, (and I have had a good deal of experience now at estimating and calculating food supplied) we have no more than will last us until August 15th at the present rate of consumption. A large Weddell seal was lying for several hours on a small floe which drifted in to within 20 yards or so from the beach but unfortunately for want of a boat it never became accessible. It is very tantalizing to see so much prospective meat within one’s gasp and yet to be unable to secure it.”

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to introduction

One hundred years ago this August, Ernest Shackleton rescued his crew after the failure of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. Rauner holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916.” These entries are a selection from the diary of the expedition’s quartermaster Thomas Orde-Lees.

Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916. To see them, come to Rauner and ask to see MSS-185 or Stefansson G850 1914 .O7 1997 during normal hours of operation.  An exhibit on Shackleton’s Antarctic explorations will be on display in Rauner from July 1-September 2, 2016.