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This post is one in a series from the personal diary of Dr. Harry Goodall, a member of Dartmouth’s class of 1898 and a Harvard-trained physician who volunteered to serve in the first World War. To start from the beginning, visit our introductory page. To read the diary in its entirety, visit Rauner Special Collections Library and ask to see the Harry Goodall papers (call number MS-397).

August 29, 1918

The incessant marching of troup [sic.], the noise of the airplanes kept me awake the first part of the night but later the fatigue brought a heavy sleep and I awoke in the early morning to find that it was raining. 

After breakfast we went to the officers meeting and found that Tucker had assigned various buildings for the medical, surgical, etc. work. He assigned us to our duties and we promptly went to these quarters and began to arrange things for service.
By the middle of the morning it had cleared up and became very pleasant.

About this time, Col. Tucker sent for me and when I reached the office he introduced me to Col. Maddux. Without words Maddux told me to jump into his machine and come with him. As we were leaving the grounds he said “I have a job for you”. “I guess your commanding officer did not want to loose you as he tried to give me Munro when I wanted you”.
In a few moments we drove into the yard of a group of buildings near our own quarters and Maddux said “Here is a group of buildings I have selected for a hospital for gas cases and I want you to take command”. “In 72 hours I want you to have 1000 beds in readiness”. Then he told me he would have 50 enlisted men report to me by noon and that he would have an officer trained in gas work report to me the next morning. 

With these few words Maddux jumped into his car and hurried away. I stood in the yard and looked about quite amazed - What should I do? Where should I begin?
Insofar as I could see I was the only human being on the area and I had but 72 hours to organize a thousand bed hospital - fortunately we had more than 72 hours. 

After a time I came to my senses and started on a tour of inspection. I found that the buildings had been used as a hospital and later found that these buildings had been the hospital of the group in peace times. Consequently it should have been fully equipped but B.H. 45 had arrived before us and the men from that unit had been over and taken every conceivable thing that could be of use to them. 

There were but 650 beds in all the buildings and there was not enough bedding etc. to make all these up.
The place was filthy and it did not seem possible for one to even get it clean in 72 hours.
Many supplies were necessary and the supplies of the center, the most of which were accumulated in the La March buildings was limited.

At 4 p.m. the promised men had not reported and I should have been thoroughly discouraged had it not been for the fact that I was delighted to get away from Tucker.
At 5 p.m. the men came - and the most forlorn lot of men one ever saw. They were class B men - men that had served in the infantry had been wounded and sent back and after their convalescence found to be unable to do front line duty.
This in itself was bad enough but the men were disgruntled, apparently nothing was so degrading to the fighting man as to be assigned to the medical department and for two weeks they gave me a lot of trouble.  

My diary states that on Aug. 29th. 1918  - 50 enlisted men from the special Training Battalion at St. Aignan, then on duty with Evacuation Hospital *3 stationed at Toul, reported for duty at the gas Hospital, J.H. Group, in compliance with S.O. No. 7, Hdqrs. J. H. G. dated August 29, 1918.
The following are the men - 

Aas 2110913 Jens Oscar
Allen 95669 John G.
Austin 38979 Pearle C.
Basile 40610 Samuel
Bowman 1597110 Neal Y.
Day Leland D.
Debau 81022 Alfred
Corsi 368814 Benjamin
Craze 1247246 Samuel
Fisher 2451597 Hyman
Forsling 1657246 Jno. R.
Foster 3191738 James
Frenette 63824 Henry W.
Gargano 54719 James
Hallebro 2851881 Ole
Georgediadis 3194803 George
Godson 1660002 John J.
Jackson 102151 George
Kelley 3194460 Frank
Kenfield Benjamin
Kirkpatrick 549715 James T. Corporal
Kruszcynski 2095773 Matthew
Kurr 194463 Max L.
LeClair 44920 Dexter
Lawrence 1351215 Willie
LeBlanc 50052 Ames
Lemantovich 545319 Pete
Lundy 39146 Patrick J.
Lyons 2790670 George
McCauley 3198830 Michael
Mazzara 50318 Giuseppe
Noice 43360 Charles G.
Pauley 540745 Cornelius
Polavicks 1795738 Joseph
Powell 16822 Stratford G.
Reader 1677616 Oliver T.
Rericha 195441 Frank
Reynolds 2225207 Barbar
Roberts 52882 James
Rosan 41791 James
Siegars 2723974 Ernest E.
Silvas 47689 Valley
Smith 2309726 Bernice
Stockbridge 540624 Leo J. Sergeant
Tally 1344973 John William
Theodore 62769 Nick
Tony 546067 John Corporal
Thompson 1425380 Alfred T.
Underwood 1591820 John S.
Wardo 547941 Phillip

This particular group of buildings were called the La Marche Annex and adjoined the Caserne La Marche.

Buildings

The buildings consisted of four stone and concrete wards, a small building suitable for administration and officers quarters, two small kitchens and a large Basseneau [sic.] tent.
The four ward buildings could easily accommodate 1000 patients but owing to the lack of beds, supplies etc. we were prepared for only 850 patients.
The buildings were divided into small rooms that accommodated about 15 patients without crowding.
These rooms were well ventilated and well lighted. The possibilities of isolation were excellent. The corridors and stair ways were spacious.
Excellent as they were in many respects yet on the other hand they presented many obstacles. There was water in but one room in each building and that was on the ground floor.
There was no place for the preparation and serving of food. Not even a place to prepare liquid food or to heat water.
There were no toilets in the buildings. In short it was a place for normal persons or at best convalescents.
All of these difficulties had to be overcome in so far as possible.

The Administration building was amply large for offices and for quartering the officers - inasmuch as we had but three.

The kitchens, two in number, were equipped with French ranges. One of the two were broken and it was not until Sept. 15 that it was repaired and then only when we took the broken part to Toul and had it repaired at our own expense.
These ranges were constructed for the evident purpose of making soups and stews. It was impossible to roast or broil in any quantity.
We had a good deal of difficulty in getting the proper kinds and the proper amounts of food for ourselves and for our enlisted men. There was an American range at the quartermasters but Col. Maddux would not give this to us until the very latter part of September. The distance between the kitchens and the wards was so great that it was practically impossilble for us to serve hot food to the men. Liquids transported in bulk kept hot but with other foods we were helpless.
Fortunately for our patients they were only allowed liquid foods except in a very few cases.

The Bessaneau [sic.] tent served as our receiving ward and was large enough for us to later keep the very sick patients in the tent where we could care for them and still keep on with the admissions. Had it not been for this there would not have been time for us to see them after they had been sent to the wards. 

There was only one small laundry, operated by hand that could do a very limited amount of work. The most of the laundry was sent to a large laundry in Nancy.

Water supply

Our water came from two sources, one from wells located on the area of the Caserne Fabvier and the other from a tank located on the area of the Caserne LaMarche that adjoined our area. This latter supply came from the Moselle River, after passing through filters. Base Hospital 45 was located on the area of the Caserne LaMarche and we found that they could shut off this supply at their pleasure, and a pleasure that they never lost an opportunity to enjoy.
We had all of our troubles with this hospital and solely because Stuart MaGuire, the Commanding Officer, was a former instructor of Col. Maddux and he gave they everything they wanted. The supply was inadequate.

Sewers

The sewer system consisted of a series of drain pipes that received through catch basins the rain water, liquids from the kitchens, and baths.

Latrines

The toilet facilities were anything but American.
They consisted of a series of side wall buildings of the squart [sic.] type. To be specific one side stood on some slight elevations not unlike the foot rests on a shoe shining stand, in order to keep the feet out of objectionable matter, which, if the aim was accurate went through a hole about 10 inches in diameter into a galvanized iron can.
French civilian contractors came around at most irregular intervals and emptied these cans. I say irregular because they were so irregular that the cans frequently overflowed.
The most remarkable thing about this however was the thing that I repeatedly saw and the only thing in France that really turned my stomach.
These men would take the cans, dump them into their wagon and then take their bare hand and wipe out the can. After this they would wipe their hands on a towel that was attached to the wagon much as our street fish vendor carries a towel, then take out a pipe and light it after filling it and smoke with the greatest of gusto.
This one thing perhaps made me disgusted with the French although there were many things of a similar nature that would make it impossible for an American to ever understand the French.

Supplies

The most serious problem we had to contend with was the problem of supplies & as a matter of fact the Red Cross had many things at Toul the Army did not have.
More than this the army would not let us take advantage of this supply because they were not big enough to admit their own shortcomings. They preferred to go without instead of accepting what was within reach. Once more had it not been for the generosity of Mr. Hayward the Gas Hospital would never have existed and my work in France would have been very doubtful. 

Kitchens

There were two kitchens, each equipped with a French range. Most of the cooking had to be done on top of the range, consequently they were suitable for practically nothing but soups and stews, etc. Unfortunately one of these was broken and could not be used.
Fortunately gas cases were put on liquid diets so that our chief difficultly would be in feeding our own enlisted force. 

These kitchens were situated at a distance from the wards so that it would be practically impossible to get the food to the wards while it was hot.

Lighting 

The whole place was lighted with electricity and the service was good.  

From MS-397, Box 1, Folder 10. To read the diary in its entirety, visit Rauner Special Collections Library and ask to see the Harry Goodall papers (MS-397).

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On Friday, October 13, 80 librarians from New England and beyond gathered at Occom Commons for the 19th Dartmouth Library October Conference. This one-day conference provides academic librarians with a venue for sharing and learning from one another.

This year’s theme was Assess, Address, Success! Proactively improving library experience. Debra Gilchrist, Ph. D., Vice President for Learning and Student Success at Pierce College, gave the keynote address “Building A Learning System One Assessment at a Time.” The day also included presentations and lightning talks on such themes as assessing student learning in the classroom, using student feedback to plan new library spaces, and improving customer service and hospitality in libraries.

The members of the 2017 October Conference planning committee were James Adams, Pamela Bagley, Laura Barrett, Emily Boyd, Katie Harding, and Julia Logan.

Thanks to Wendel Cox, Ridie Ghezzi, and Morgan Swan who gave library tours, Lisa Ladd who helped with registration, Palden Flynn who designed the conference program, and to everyone else in the library who helped with this event.

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

DEN Innovation Center
DEN Innovation Center at 4 Currier Place

Feldberg Librarians at DEN

Since the spring of 2016 Feldberg librarians Anne Esler, Karen Sluzenski, and Emily Boyd have been embedded with the Dartmouth Entrepreneurial Network (DEN). The DEN is a co-working space located at 4 Currier Place in Hanover and provides programming and resources for students with entrepreneurial pursuits.

Feldberg Librarians are available for consultations at DEN during “Research Office Hours” and have had many interesting interactions with students, faculty and other community members. Winners of the two-minute pitch competition "The Pitch" receive consultations with librarians in addition to cash prizes and consultations with entrepreneurs. Librarians provide instruction around library resources related to market research and analysis, patents, and more. DEN is a strong program that is continuing to evolve, and the Feldberg librarians have found meaningful ways to engage with their programming and participants. Interactions with Feldberg librarians and the resources available through the library can play a key role in helping students identify potential opportunities and work on their projects.

DCAL logoCourse Design Institute for New Faculty

Sixteen new faculty attended a DCAL-sponsored three-day institute on course design August 15-17. The institute was designed and facilitated by a team from DCAL, Instructional Design, and the Library.

The content was structured using the Understanding by Design (also known as backwards design) model with the theme of universal design woven throughout. There were hands on activities, group activities, lots of discussion, and time for participants to apply what they learned to designing their own course.

Research Data Workshops

The Library’s Research Data Management Interest Group recently completed its second data management workshop series for faculty, staff, and students across campus. Designed to provide support for data driven research on campus, the six-session series explored the research data management lifecycle and provided best practices and hands-on instruction on a variety of data topics and tools.

Data life cycle
The Library and Research Computing offered workshops exploring the different stages of the research data lifecycle.

The series included sessions on data management planning and the DMPTool, data management using Excel, data sharing and preservation, research data storage on campus and beyond, data tidying with OpenRefine and Tableau, and data visualization with R. A collaborative project between the Library and Research Computing, the workshops were led by James Adams (RIS), Pamela Bagley (Biomed), Christian Darabos (ITS), Don Fitzpatrick (Biomed), Katie Harding (Kresge), Lora Leligdon (Kresge), and Jenny Mullins (Preservation).

Offered in both winter and summer terms, the workshops were attended by over 100 participants and received excellent feedback.  Next winter, a revised series will be held at DHMC with special focus on RDM for biomedical and human subjects research.

Workshop materials and future offering can be found on the data management research guide. For more information, or to request a workshop, please contact ResearchDataHelp@groups.dartmouth.edu.

Baker Tower
Contributors: Emily Boyd (Feldberg Librarians at DEN), Pamela Bagley (Course Design Institute for New Faculty), and Lora Leligdon (Research Data Workshops).
Editor: Katie Harding

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

Student-Led Publishing at Dartmouth

Students at the Library's Student Publishing Fair
Students at the Library's Student Publishing Fair

This winter and spring, Laura Barrett, Director of Education and Outreach, and Barbara DeFelice, Program Director, Scholarly Communication, Copyright, & Publishing, developed a series of innovative programs supporting student-led publishing at Dartmouth, funded by the DCAL experiential learning initiative grant “Preparing students to be arbiters of new scholarship: Editing, reviewing, and publishing in the 21st century.” Student-Led Publishing at Dartmouth is a new program, but it grew out of our on-going explorations of the intersections of information literacy and scholarly communication to benefit Dartmouth students. In January, we kicked off the year with the Student Led Publishing Fair in Baker Main Hall. Dartmouth students representing 10 student-led publications participated by displaying their work, networking with one another, and sharing ideas for how student publishing can be best supported on campus. Through video interviews, we heard in their own words what they learn from engaging in this time-consuming, co-curricular work. Next, about 20 students participated in our spring workshop series in which they explored publishing best practices, copyright and author rights, and editorial policies. They wrapped up their experience by reflecting on all they learned and making plans for improving their publications based on their new knowledge. In April, students from Dartmouth and throughout New England gathered in Baker Library for the 2017 Northeast Student PubCon. The conference featured inspiring talks, workshops led by publishing experts, networking over lunch, and a display of student-led publications from multiple institutions. A video about the conference will be available later this summer. Although we are wrapping up the DCAL ELI grant funded work, the deep learning and program development that resulted from this grant will have a long-lasting impact.

Library Presents Awards for Undergraduate Research, Book Arts

Megan Ong (top) and Emily Burack (bottom), both members of the class of 2017, were winners of the first Undergraduate Thesis Library Research Award
Megan Ong (top) and Emily Burack (bottom), both members of the class of 2017, were winners of the first Undergraduate Thesis Library Research Award

Dartmouth College Library presented its first Undergraduate Thesis Library Research Award at the Senior Honors Thesis Showcase reception on Berry Main Street near the end of spring term. Eligibility for the award is open to any student who writes a senior thesis and is majoring in the humanities, social science, and interdisciplinary fields. This award is analogous to the Library Research Award in the Sciences, which has been awarded at the Wetterhahn Symposium since 2015. Read more about the new thesis research award.

Harriette Yahr '87's entry, 2017/Onward -- A Book Arts Exploration, won Honorable Mention for Community
Harriette Yahr '87's entry, 2017/Onward -- A Book Arts Exploration, won Honorable Mention for Community

The Book Arts Prize is a juried award given every year in recognition of excellence in the creation of a hand printed and bound book made in the Book Arts Studio by a Dartmouth College undergraduate, graduate, or community member. The cash prizes are made possible through the generosity of the Friends of the Library. View a list of this year's winning entries, which are currently on display in the Treasure Room cases in Baker Library.

 

#WhatIsCritLib

Participants read and discussed excerpts from the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook
Participants read and discussed excerpts from the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook

From March-May 2017, Jill Baron, on behalf of the Education & Outreach committee, coordinated a three-part series entitled #WhatIsCritLib for library staff at Dartmouth. According to the critlib.org website, “Critlib is short for ‘critical librarianship,’ a movement of library workers dedicated to bringing social justice principles into our work in libraries.” Participants read and discussed excerpts from the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook (2016), and portions of bell hooks’ Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom and Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy of the Oppressed. The series aimed to spark a conversation about this movement, its intellectual grounding in Freire, hooks and others, and explore questions related to pedagogical practices, implicit bias, and subverting limitations in the “one-shot” information literacy session. The Library’s Education & Outreach committee has long served as a venue for conversations about teaching research and inquiry, and this series encouraged self-reflection, study, and professional development around classroom practices and encounters with patrons.

 Baker Tower
Contributors: Barbara DeFelice and Laura Barrett (Student-Led Publishing at Dartmouth), Morgan Swan and Sarah M. Smith (Library Presents Awards for Undergraduate Research, Book Arts), and Jill Baron (#WhatIsCritLib).
Editor: Andi Bartelstein

Left to right: Ran Zhuo, Priyanka Sivaramakrishnan, and Dean of Libraries Sue Mehrer discuss Student Library Service Bookplate selections from 2016.

The Student Library Service Bookplate Program honors graduating student employees by inviting them to choose books or other items for the Library’s collections. Each item will include a bookplate acknowledging the student’s selection and recognizing his or her service to the Library. Eligible students have worked at least two terms in a Library department, including the Student Center for Research, Writing and Information Technology (RWIT).

“The tremendous quality and quantity of assistance that the library’s student workers provide is invaluable. It’s great that we’re able to honor the achievements of those graduating with items that have personal meaning to them,” observed Greg Potter, Research and Information Desk Coordinator. In addition to Potter and Cox, the Bookplate Program committee includes Goodie Corriveau, Wendel Cox, Julie McIntyre, and Tim Wolfe.

“The selections reflect student interests, passions, and humor,” said Cox, Research and Instruction Services (RIS) librarian for History and English. “It is always fascinating to see what they choose.”

For 2017, Dartmouth College Library honors 34 students with selections including works of fiction, musical CDs, and classic works of the cartoon arts to a musical score and a history of makeup.

An exhibit of student honorees and their selections, created by Dennis Grady, Dartmouth College Library Web Support and Graphic Arts Specialist, runs in Baker Main Hall June 9-August 30, 2017. Baker-Berry Library display panels will also present each honoree's selection.

Visit the Bookplate Program’s webpage for a full listing of student selections for the program.

As the academic year comes to a close and final exams approach, we in the Library are once again encouraging you to get up, stretch, and take regular breaks from studying -- it will help you in the long run. To that end, Laura Braunstein, Digital Humanities Librarian, with the assistance of Nate Cardin '05 and Andrew Kingsley '16, has created a Dartmouth-themed crossword puzzle to help you de-stress. Look for other study breaks in and around the libraries as well -- anywhere you see this sign:  Want the answer key to the puzzle? Find it here.

1

College campuses have a long history as sites of activism and protest. It’s a truth acknowledged easily enough by today’s students, who have witnessed and in some cases participated in current movements like Black Lives Matter, #NoDAPL, and the Women’s March on Washington, among numerous others. What may be less apparent is the role the college plays when the activism dust settles.

At Dartmouth, the archivists of Rauner Special Collections Library are committed to recording the College’s history—the history of many years ago and the history of yesterday—through primary source documents. Campus activism is a significant part of this history, and one of the most effective ways of capturing it is via first-person narrative.

Oral history is an interview-based approach to documenting the past, centering around an in-depth, recorded conversation between two people: the oral historian and an individual who experienced a particular event, era, or culture firsthand. Because of its emphasis on non-dominant perspectives and marginalized voices, oral history is uniquely situated among history methodologies to document moments of protest and dissent. It is, at its heart, a means of telling stories that might otherwise have gone untold.

This exhibit explores three protest movements in Dartmouth’s past, and a selection of oral history interviews with individuals who experienced them. These interviews and many more are available at Rauner Special Collections Library.

Exhibit curated by Caitlin Birch, Digital Collections and Oral History Archivist, and designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: May 1 - July  30, 2017

Twenty men standing on an icy island with thick snowsuit on.
"Elephant Island Men"

Yesterday, one hundred years ago, the crew of the Endurance was rescued by their leader, Ernest Shackleton. More than four months had passed since he departed Elephant Island aboard the James Caird with five of their crewmates. George Marston, the expedition’s artist, and Frank Hurley, the photographer, were the first to spot the small steam tug Yelcho, a Chilean naval vessel that was lent to Shackleton for his return to Antarctic waters.

In their excitement to see the ship, the remaining crew members tore through the door and walls of their makeshift shelter. Shackleton’s approach from the tug to shore in a small boat was greeted with ragged and weak cheers from the crew, who began to question him before the bow of the boat could touch sand. Within an hour or so of Shackleton’s landing, the entire crew had been transported to the tug and were on their way back to civilization.

Not a single man was lost, although Orde-Lee was almost left behind. He had remained behind at the campsite to show Shackleton around, but realized that Shackleton had no intention of touring the site only after the last boat had shoved off from shore. After a frantic dash down the beach, Orde-Lees hurled himself headlong into the boat and labeled himself “the last man to leave the accursed spot.”

It seems fitting that the last man to leave the island also should be the last to speak here about the ordeal. In his diary entry for August 30th, 1916, Orde-Lees gives praise to Shackleton, saying that he “at the greatest peril had undertaken a journey of unprecedented magnitude with the most utterly inadequate equipment in order to bring succor to his men marooned on an Antarctic island, a debt that we can never repay him except by demanding that he shall receive the honours due to all heroes who at their own great personal risk save the lives of those for whom they are responsible. All honour then to this truly brave man.”

Previous entry  |  Go to introduction

Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916. To see them, come to Rauner and ask to see MSS-185 or Stefansson G850 1914 .O7 1997 during normal hours of operation.  An exhibit on Shackleton’s Antarctic explorations will be on display in Rauner from July 1-September 2, 2016.

By Thomas Orde-Lees, Quartermaster

"August 1916, 23.

No change in pack or weather.

Certain members are exhibiting obvious concerns about the present food shortage and strange to say now that there really is a shortage the imperturbable pessimists are apparently quite unconcerned and certainly are not saying anything in the nature of "We told you so." It is not unusual that pessimism and equanimity are counterparts.

Three boats sailing on icy ocean
"Endurance under full sail" - courtesy of Shackleton Endurance Photography

The manner in which the aforesaid members exhibit their fears is in trying to overcome them assuming that the pessimists are now thoroughly scared and therefore making mocking remarks such as "Now we shall all starve" and "We shall have to eat the one who dies first" and so on, which has actually occurred before now when people have been in only very slightly worse straits than we are now. There's many a true word said in jest. To a close observer there are many other indications in the way that the fatuous optimists shout loudly to each other all manner of such remarks about the food supply question as if to keep their spirits up by the cheery loudness of their voices in much the same way psych-ologically as Chinese walking along a road at night shout loudly to each other to keep off evil spirits in other words fear by mutual encouragement.

Of course the probability is that we have ample to support us until the pack clears off again, for it has now been in for a week and the longest previous spell has been 13 days only, but when it does clear we shall have no reserve left and, should we be based again within a few days for a more we should be in a bad way.

I had gone round the foot of Penguin Hill and had reached the top in order to give a had with the rope, but as I was immediately afterwards required down on the ice foot I had the pleasure of being lowered over the precipice on the end of the rope, and subsequently ascended by the same means.

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to introduction

One hundred years ago this August, Ernest Shackleton rescued his crew after the failure of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. Rauner holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916.” These entries are a selection from the diary of the expedition's quartermaster Thomas Orde-Lees.

Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916. To see them, come to Rauner and ask to see MSS-185 or Stefansson G850 1914 .O7 1997 during normal hours of operation.  An exhibit on Shackleton’s Antarctic explorations will be on display in Rauner from July 1-September 2, 2016.

By Thomas Orde-Lees, Quartermaster

"July 1916, 25.

Mild and damp. West wind and snow.

We had quite an exciting incident today. A large pregnant female seal drifted quite close in on an ice-slab in West Bay at a place where there is a good ice-foot over the rocks but where Penguin Hill rises in an abrupt precipice. Wild came along with his little gun but failed to make his usual fine shooting and although he shot it three times in the head he did no kill it. As he had only three cartridges with him he sent Holness back tot he hut for some more.

"The James Caird" - courtesy of Shackleton Endurance Photography

To reach the hut it was necessary to go right round the foot of Penguin Hill a distance of some 300 yards over a difficult rocky path. Whilst Holness was away the seal so far recovered itself that it got its head and shoulder over the edge of the little floe and was about to dive when Holness arrived. It was an anxious moment for fear we might lose this valuable quantity of food. Wild then successfully dispatched it and it was decided to cut it up where it lay as soon as the floe drifted in close enough to gain access to it, and to haul it up the precipice by rope.

I had gone round the foot of Penguin Hill and had reached the top in order to give a had with the rope, but as I was immediately afterwards required down on the ice foot I had the pleasure of being lowered over the precipice on the end of the rope, and subsequently ascended by the same means.

The seal was cut up into four pieces and hauled up and the fully developed foetus which had only about two months to go was hauled up complete. We also got two penguins."

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to introduction

One hundred years ago this August, Ernest Shackleton rescued his crew after the failure of the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition. Rauner holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916.” These entries are a selection from the diary of the expedition's quartermaster Thomas Orde-Lees.

Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall holds a complete transcript of the diary and the manuscript diary from March 24th, 1915, through April 16th, 1916. To see them, come to Rauner and ask to see MSS-185 or Stefansson G850 1914 .O7 1997 during normal hours of operation.  An exhibit on Shackleton’s Antarctic explorations will be on display in Rauner from July 1-September 2, 2016.