Math at Pixar

One of my favorite short films is Geri’s Game. I still watch it from time to time on my DVD copy of A Bug’s Life and marvel at the animation and delightful story. When my colleague forwarded this Mental Floss article (Talking Math at Pixar), I couldn’t resist sharing. Numberphile interviewed Tony DeRose about the mathematics used in Pixar animations and Geri was where it all started. It’s quite math heavy but nothing we can’t handle!

Math and Movies (Animation at Pixar) – Numberphile

In fact, if you’re looking for more math, here’s a summary of a talk he gave for the Mathematical Association of America. Another summary from a talk he gave at MoMath — read the end about software.  Tony also did a math light TED-Ed talk that’s worth a look:

Pixar: The math behind the movies – Tony DeRose

If I’ve piqued your interest, check out some of the following books and DVDs from the Library:

Mathematica and Wolfram Alpha Pro

If you haven’t yet heard, Dartmouth has a site license to Mathematica 10 and Wolfram Alpha Pro (supported by ITS)! I attended a demo two weeks ago and there are a number of cool new features in the new Mathematica, including integration with the Cloud.

Filed under: Astronomy, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Math, Physics, Research, Tech Tips

Open Access Week 2014

Learn about new tools and opportunities during Open Access Week with information tables and workshops around campus all week long!

Mon
10/20
Tues
10/21
Wed
10/22
Thurs
10/23
Fri
10/24
Info Tables Open Source
Thayer MacLean Atrium
10:30am-12:30pm
Open Arts
Baker Library Main Hall
2-4pm
Open Data
Fairchild Tower Pendulum
10:30am-12:30pm
Open Science
LSC Gallery
9-11am
Open Education
Novack Café
9:30-11:30am
Events Know Your Copyrights
DCAL
12-1:30pm
Pathways to Open Research
DCAL
12-1:30pm

Stop by the information tables to learn about open access, publishing, copyright, author rights, open education and more; pick up materials; and make something Open! We will be talking about support for open access journal publishing fees (which is provided by the Compact on Open Access Publishing Equity fund), the Dartmouth Author’s Amendment, the Faculty Open Access Policy Resolution, and current trends in publishing and scholarly communication.

In addition, the Know Your Copyrights workshop will help you answer the question: “Can I post my publications in full text on….my web site, my departmental website, the institutional web site, my course site, sharing sites such as Mendeley, Academia.edu, ResearchGate or.. ?Please sign up here as lunch is provided.

In Pathways to Open Research, Dr. Kes Schroer will wrap up Open Access Week events by sharing her experiences at the “Open Science for Synthesis” program and offer insights on the power of open access, open data and open source for rapid, reproducible scholarship. Following Dr. Schroer’s remarks, we will have a roundtable discussion about all things open, including music, art, literature, education, and more. Please sign-up as lunch is provided.

More details: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~library/schcomm/OAWeek2014.html

Download the flyer here.

CV & Resume Writing Help for STEM Students

This series of events is brought to you by the Center for Professional Development and Kresge Library! All events will take place in the Kresge Library Conference Room.

STEM_Series CVs_Workshop

Applying to Graduate School Programs: CVs for Science Storytelling

Interested in applying for STEM-related positions or programs that ask for a CV instead of a resume? In this fast-paced workshop, Neukom Fellow and postdoc Kes Schroer will provide you with an overview of what to include and what to leave out — as well as tips for how to share your skills and experience in terms easily understood by scientists and non-scientists alike.

When: Thursday, October 23 at 12-1pm
Register by 10/23 at 10am! Click here.

Kresge Face Time

Chat with CPD advisor Chandlee Bryan and get all your questions answered!

When: Wednesday, October 29 at 5:30-8:30pm

Formatting Your CV/Resume in LaTeX

Join Physical Sciences Librarian Shirley Zhao for a hands-on workshop to format your CV or resume in LaTeX. Use what you learned in the previous events and come away with a working document.

When: Thursday, October 30 at 12-1pm

New! Access and Borrowing Privileges at Our Partner Libraries

borrowdirectDartmouth-affiliated faculty, students, and staff can now enjoy on-site access and on-site borrowing privileges at other BorrowDirect institutions and some Ivies Plus institutions! Access information and borrowing policy details are maintained by each institution’s library and may vary from one institution to another. New accounts must be created at the location and within the hours set by each institution. For more information and a list of participating institutions, please see BorrowDirect Plus On-Site Borrowing

oclc-researchIn addition, Dartmouth participates in SHARES, which is a collaborative effort of OCLC’s Research Library Partnership group. Dartmouth-affiliated faculty, students, and staff have on-site access at over 100 research and museum libraries around the world. This partnership also streamlines our DartDoc services. Learn more about SHARES and see the list of participating libraries.

eduroamIf that’s not enough to get you excited, Dartmouth is now part of the eduroam community! eduroam provides a way for you to be WiFi authenticated at another institution without having to go through any local guest setup. Once authenticated you are on that institution’s network with access to their internet and library’s resources, although you would still have to use the same remote methods to access any Dartmouth-specific services and resources. Learn more about how to set up your access through Dartmouth and see participating institutions.

If you are not at any of our partner institutions, you can always rely on WebGateway or the Juniper VPN for general off-campus access to the Library’s resources. Please contact your subject librarian if you have any questions.

Get Started with LaTeX

latex_handoutBy now, you’re convinced that writing your documents using LaTeX is the way to go. Your papers, presentations, and even homework assignments will look publication-ready with its fancy headers, section numbering, and beautifully typeset mathematical equations. You’re ready to make the leap from MS Word, but how do you begin?

First, you have to decide between online versus offline use. There are pros and cons to each, but the major difference is if you plan to have internet access while you’re working on your documents.

Certainly if you don’t want the hassle of downloading the software and choosing an editor, go with one of the web options (all of these allow for collaborative writing as well):

  • writeLaTeX — instant updating of your new content or edits
  • ShareLaTeX — watch your collaborators type (like google docs)
  • Authorea — version control through git

But if you do want your own installation, start with downloading the right software distribution for your operating system here and follow the instructions to install. You should allow for at least 30 minutes for the whole process. Factors to consider: internet speed, size of the software (varies), speed of your computer, etc.

You may notice that your distribution may or may not come with a starter editor, which is your interface to writing. For example, MacTeX comes with TeXShop. You’re not obligated to use it and you are free to choose whatever editor you want. You may already be using an editor to code in other languages; e.g. Vim or Emacs. Check out this table for comparison.

Now you’re ready to make your first document! If you’d like a suggestion, try writing your CV/resume. I will be holding a workshop on formatting tips for your CV/resume in LaTeX on Thursday, October 30 at noon in Kresge Library. Save the date and bring your document!

Welcome Back to Another Year!

Beaver Pond, White Mountains, New Hampshire

Welcome back! The past couple of weeks were abuzz with excitement as we welcomed the Class of 2018, new graduate students, and new faculty to campus. Kresge is as quiet as ever (great for studying!) so come on over to the third floor of Fairchild.

Our Fall hours (also posted on the entrances) are as follows:

  • Monday – Thursday 8am – 1am
  • Friday 8am – 8pm
  • Saturday 11am – 10pm
  • Sunday 11am – 1am

If you are looking for course reserves or need to borrow a laptop charger, please inquire at the front desk. We even carry molecular model kits, protractors, calculators, and headphones!

Filed under: Kresge, Library – General

Celebrating 40 Years of Kresge Library

Come join us at Kresge Library as we celebrate 40 years! Save the date:

Friday, September 19 at 1-2:30pm.

Join us for cake & refreshments, and enjoy our display of photos from Kresge’s past (including some familiar faces and photos from the stacks ‘flood’ in the summer of ’83).

Kresge40_whitePosterThis poster was printed by Sarah Smith (Book Arts Program).

Filed under: For Fun, Kresge

On Supporting Science and Scholarly Communications

poster

Click photo for an enlarged version of the poster

Last week, I presented a poster at the annual Special Libraries Association conference. The theme of the conference was Beyond Borders so the poster was titled “Beyond Information Literacy: Supporting Science & Scholarly Communications.” Click here to get the PDF or email me if you’d like the source file (SVG).

Abstract: ACRL defines information literacy as the set of skills needed to find, retrieve, analyze, and use information [1]. While librarians have embraced their roles as educators, many have not gone beyond teaching these skills in courses, workshops, and individual consultations. In the sciences especially, information is easily available through well established digital infrastructures (e.g. repositories) and new publishing models (e.g. open access). Because science students learn how to analyze and use that information through coursework and departmental advising, librarians must find other ways to support them. The librarians at Dartmouth College have begun focusing on helping students develop communication skills and greater awareness of how scientists disseminate their work. This poster will highlight some innovative ways to support scholarly communications and to teach science students how to effectively communicate the knowledge they have acquired. Areas of focus include organizing references, learning and using LaTeX, designing and presenting a research poster, crafting a science elevator pitch, exploring publishing options, and measuring the impact of different work.

[1] Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. Association of College & Research Libraries, 2000; http://www.acrl.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/standards/standards.pdf.

I analyzed the types of private consultations we received at Kresge and the types of outreach programs we hosted or participated in. The data shows that consultations about scientific communication have generally increased, both as a percentage of total consultations and in absolute number. An increased number of outreach programs in the previous semester appear to result in an increased number of consultations and interest in scholarly communication. In other words, there’s value in supporting science and scholarly communications and the library can and should support these needs.

There were a lot of follow-up questions and general interest in the LaTeX-related programs. I had presented specifically on teaching and supporting LaTeX at the Mathematics Roundtable session the day before. People seemed excited to try supporting it at their own institutions.

For further thoughts, read my other blog entry and come by Kresge to see the poster!

Filed under: Kresge, Publishing, Research