A Dartmouth Doctor in WWI

July 31, 1918

At 7 a.m. I looked out of the window and we were going through Philadelphia. 
It was cloudy and very cool, in fact I had pulled the blanket over me in the night.
From here we went over the B.&O., Phila. & Reading, and Central Ry. of N.J. By this time we had been informed that we were going to Camp Upton, N.Y. Tucker also told us that up to this time even he did not know where we were going. 
We had breakfast—cold egg, jam, bread. The ham had given out. 
We arrived at Jersey City at 9.40 a.m. 
Here we had to transfer the baggage to the ferry and it was about 10.30 when the ferry started.
It was a delight to see the water front and to smell salt water once more. Once the ferry started the wind was so strong and so cold after the heat of Ga. we were all chilled and were obliged to put our overcoats on.
We arrived at Long Island City at 11 a.m. and here we were met by the Red Cross and they gave us a scanty lunch of deviled ham sandwiches and coffee. 
We entrained and left at 12.46 p.m. 
We arrived at Camp Upton at 3 p.m. 
Insofar as I could see no one was expecting us and we waited about the station for some time and then trucks arrived to take us to the Camp. 
We had been on the train three days, there was no opportunity to bathe and we all felt extremely dirty.
We were taken to the barrack that was to be our quarters. 
It was tagged 606. There could be no question but what at some time it had been the ward for venereal disease.
We went in – it was dirty filthy, it took some time for us to accommodate ourselves. However war is war and we put the men to work cleaning it up, forgot the past and accepted our new home – hell of a place for physicians. 

From MS-397, Box 1, Folder 8. To read the diary in its entirety, visit Rauner Special Collections Library and ask to see the Harry Goodall papers (MS-397).

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October Conference 2017: Assess, Address, Success!

On Friday, October 13, 80 librarians from New England and beyond gathered at Occom Commons for the 19th Dartmouth Library October Conference. This one-day conference provides academic librarians with a venue for sharing and learning from one another.

This year’s theme was Assess, Address, Success! Proactively improving library experience. Debra Gilchrist, Ph. D., Vice President for Learning and Student Success at Pierce College, gave the keynote address “Building A Learning System One Assessment at a Time.” The day also included presentations and lightning talks on such themes as assessing student learning in the classroom, using student feedback to plan new library spaces, and improving customer service and hospitality in libraries.

The members of the 2017 October Conference planning committee were James Adams, Pamela Bagley, Laura Barrett, Emily Boyd, Katie Harding, and Julia Logan.

Thanks to Wendel Cox, Ridie Ghezzi, and Morgan Swan who gave library tours, Lisa Ladd who helped with registration, Palden Flynn who designed the conference program, and to everyone else in the library who helped with this event.

A Dartmouth Doctor in WWI

July 29, 1918

At last the day of departure had come.
Everyone was up early. Everything was excitement. 
Tucker had warned us not to make any noise or do anything that the Hospital might consider “rough”.
Our baggage was out at 7.45 a.m. according to instructions.
A half hour later it began to shower and we hustled to get it under cover. A half an hour later it was out again. 
We had lunch at 11.30 a.m. but everyone was so excited that they ate very little. 
At 12.30 we lined up to march to the station. Most of the Officers of the Hospital and many of the nurses came out to see us off and wish us well. Major Sailer was not to be seen & a very peculiar man (not for this reason alone, he evidently felt he was entitled to be the leading figure in any movement.) 
At 12.35 we began our march to the Swift Creek Station, the enlisted men falling in behind us as soon as we turned the corner into the road to the station. 
We left amidst the cheers of the onlookers. 
It was extremely hot by this time.  
We were dressed in our blouses, were wearing our medicine belts, and canteens filled with water.
It was a twenty minute march and by the time we arrived at the station we were bathed in sweat.

We entrained shortly after 8 p.m. and at 1.30 the train pulled out of the station. 
We arrived at Macon at 1.30 p.m.
At Macon we transferred to a special train of two Pullmans, five coaches and a baggage car.
We left Macon at 2.30 p.m. It was a relief to get our coats off, our boots off and to sit around by the windows in our shirt sleeves and slippers. 
Everyone was hilarious – At last we were one our way – We were thankful to get away from Macon – We never wanted to see that place again. 
There were cards, signing, jokes etc.
At 6.30 p.m. (Central time, 7.30 Eastern time) we arrived at Augusta. We were delayed here on account of a hot box. 
The Red Cross came up and gave us ice cream, coffee, cigarettes, and Post cards. True to the Movies the Red Cross were waiting for us.
After leaving the station McLean told us that we had to pay for the coffee and ice cream. He was quite angry because they charged 60 cents a gal. for the coffee.
The train left Augusta at 9.30 p.m. 
We were served dinner before leaving—cold ham, eggs, bread, cake, and sliced peaches. 
Once the train started riot ruled again and there was no sleep until after midnight. By this time the boys were tired and we had not only a cool night but a quiet one. 

From MS-397, Box 1, Folder 8. To read the diary in its entirety, visit Rauner Special Collections Library and ask to see the Harry Goodall papers (MS-397).

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A Dartmouth Doctor in WWI

July 28, 1918

Fair but very warm.
We are to leave tomorrow.

Spend the morning in repacking my trunks and bag.
Had two Army trunks and a large hand bag.
Informed today that field officers would now be allowed but one trunk.
It takes some time to decide what things I should take after we had included the things that had to be taken.
Needless to say I had to discharge the sweaters, woolen stockings, etc. that my kind friends had given me before leaving home. 
I left them with the boys.
I have often wondered what became of all the things that the women were knitting, the bandages that were rolled etc. Certainly I never saw any signs of them after leaving the States, with the exception of the things on the mens back, worn as clothing. 
Went over to camp this afternoon to see a ball game.
Much excitement during the evening. Very little sleep. 

From MS-397, Box 1, Folder 8. To read the diary in its entirety, visit Rauner Special Collections Library and ask to see the Harry Goodall papers (MS-397).

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A Dartmouth Doctor in WWI

July 18, 1918

Warm, sultry.
Told this morning we would leave on the 22nd. or 23rd.
Everyone elated.
We do more than pack trunks, we do our washing.
Every one elated. Probably the most exciting day at Wheeler. 
The place was filled with clothes that had been washed by the men themselves. 
The men were singing, shouting, and raising “Merry Hell”.
The men attached to the B.H. were disgusted with *51.

Sat on board of Court Martial this afternoon, name of person not essential. A very disagreeable job.

The morning papers tell us, the first information that we have, that Hardy has taken out a marriage license. 

From MS-397, Box 1, Folder 8. To read the diary in its entirety, visit Rauner Special Collections Library and ask to see the Harry Goodall papers (MS-397).

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A Dartmouth Doctor in WWI

July 16, 1918

Hot. 
Inspected Field Hospital *128, Col. George Keenan (Boston) in Command, this afternoon. Jon McLean goes with me. 
Quartermaster tells us that he has routed us for Camp Merritt today. 
Now we are sure we are going (but we never saw Camp Merritt). 
Even today I do not know whether Washington was responsible for all of our misinformation or Camp Wheeler. 
Col. Lund and I go to the 8 p.m. train to meet Tucker who has been on leave—home to see his family. He did not come.

At the general clinic at 5 p.m. today an insane patient (so called) was demonstrated. Among other things he was asked where he was. The patient said he thought he was in Hell but that they told him he was in Camp Wheeler. McLean interrupted and declared that the man was sane. 

From MS-397, Box 1, Folder 8. To read the diary in its entirety, visit Rauner Special Collections Library and ask to see the Harry Goodall papers (MS-397).

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A Dartmouth Doctor in WWI

June 30, 1918

Very hot and sultry. 
Breakfast at 8 a.m. 
I make the ward visit today, finishing my work at 10.30 a.m.
I write my Sunday letters and then for the want of something better to day (sic.) repack my trunk. 
There was much time for thought –
I had been in the Army four months. I had offered my service with the definite promise from Major Janeway that I would not have to serve at home, that I would be sent overseas. 
When I arrived at Camp Greene and saw that there was not immediate prospects of going over I could readily understand it as there was a distinct need of physicians at that time. 
But after six weeks there was no further need of my services. 
I had asked permission to take some special courses and this was refused.
Life however was tolerated as the men at the Camp were most agreeable. 
Since my transfer to Wheeler life was a hardship. Major Sailer kept the entire service to himself and I had very little to do. One might loaf under pleasing circumstances but here the heat was most trying, the food very poor and there were no opportunities for relaxation. On the contrary I was obliged to listen to the almost constant complaints of the men in my unit. 
We were treated like children and not like educated men. One day we were told we were going over soon and the next day we were told that they did not know when we would go. 

By this time the entire unit was disorganized. 
We had lost our enthusiasm, we had lost our energy, we did not want to work. 
We wonder if we were fools for enlisting so early.
As for myself I could not help but feel that I had made a mistake. 
More than half of my patients had urged me not to enlist, they told me it was the work of younger men and that my place was at home. I wonder now, idling my time as I was, if after all they were not right.
Certainly I would not have enlisted had I known what was ahead of me. 
Long before I did enlist the talk all over the country was that “more medical men are needed”. Today we have 102 Medical Officers at a Hospital and not enough work for 30.

From MS-397, Box 1, Folder 7. To read the diary in its entirety, visit Rauner Special Collections Library and ask to see the Harry Goodall papers (MS-397).

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Dimensions of Open exhibit

As you walk through Baker Main Hall, take a moment to enjoy the Dimensions of Open exhibit, which is on display now through January 2018. This exhibit is inspired by the efforts of Dartmouth authors, creators, artists, and inventors to make the results of their work openly and publicly available. The work of Dartmouth scholars and researchers is often in collaboration with authors across the globe, and immediate access to that work has a significant global impact. This exhibit reveals the complex issues surrounding open information through six dimensions: global, political, financial, workforce, technological, and future.

On display now: Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall: October 16, 2017 – January 26, 2018
Opening reception: Monday, October 23rd, 10-11am.  Refreshments will be served and all are welcome!
October 23rd-27th is also Open Access Week! Visit dartgo.org/open for more events and workshops.

Read about this an other library exhibits at:https://www.dartmouth.edu/~library/exhibits/bakerberry/index.html

Special thanks to those who made this exhibit possible:
Content Creation: Barbara DeFelice and Jen Green: Scholarly Communication, Copyright, and Publishing Program; Pamela Bagley, Laura Braunstein, Barbara DeFelice, Monica Erives, Jen Green, Janifer Holt, and Lora Leligdon: The Open Dartmouth Working Group; Exhibit Design: Dennis Grady: Education & Outreach; Data Visualizations: James Adams: Research and Instruction Services; Editorial Review: Laura Barrett: Education and Outreach.

 

 

A Dartmouth Doctor in WWI

June 24, 1918

Arrived at Atlanta at 6.30 a.m. (5.30 central time)
Both nights on the train were very comfortable. 
Hot again this morning.
Left Atlanta at 7.50 arriving at Macon at 11.10, and at camp at 11.45.
Surprised to meet Mr. Sawyer of Brookline on this train. 
Weight 198 pounds – a gain of 16 pounds during the leave.

Arriving at camp I found the men in the dumps. 
Col. Tucker had returned and thought we would remain where we were until the first of Sept.
The heat was terricis (sic.) after the pleasant weather I had been having. 
The mess had been moved to the Officers building and was very much improved. McLean had been made mess Officer. 

I was much impressed with my leave. 
I had been away from civilization for about four months. 
I was getting accustomed to the change and the petty things that are bound to occur when few persons are brought in constant close contact. 

The outside world seemed pleasant but from two points of view. It was a great pleasure to find out how much my friends thought of me, how they put themselves out in every conceivable way to make my stay a pleasant one. It was a pleasure to be c ol (sic.) once more. 

The rest of the outside world was amusing – 
All of the stations were crowded with soldiers and civilians. The stations were dirty, there were long lines of people standing in line at the ticket windows. They were not waited upon promptly. The ticket agents were careless. Repeatedly I heard complaints about mistakes. In N.Y. on my way back the agent had sold me a Southern Ry. ticket and a Seaboard sleeper. This made it necessary for me to change in Washington. 
The sleepers were dirty. Frequently there was no running water. Once there was no drinking water. 

The food was very good or at least in comparisson with what we had been having in Macon. 
One day I sat across the isle from a table that was occupied by a portly gentleman with a very large stomach. There was a large diamond pin in his tie and several diamond rings on his fingers. He constantly complained about the food and about the service. Finally the waiter spilled some water on him and in his rage he addressed the Officer opposite him. The Officer replied “If you were in camp with me you would appreciate the food you are getting, you would appreciate the service, you would soon lose your large stomach. I know of no reason why I should be giving my services any more than you should be giving yours. If you continue this objectionable behavior I shall be obliged to leave the table.”

A woman of evident luxury and about 50 seasons was heard to remark to a friend “We shall stay in New York this year until the 25th of June if we can stand it.”  (this was on the way up and in the early part of June. A summer in Macon would help that family tolerate New York a little better.)

One day in the smoker an automobile salesman was talking with a Corporal. The salesman asked the soldier how he could avoid the draft (and I frequently had this question asked of me and have overheard it being asked of others.) The Corporal replied “It is the easiest thing in the world to avoid the draft, all you have to do is enlist.”

While I was on leave the rule was made the soldiers on leave etc. could travel at the rate of one cent a mile. 
In order to take advantage of this reduction it was necessary to obtain a certification from the Quartermaster. This often took the better part of a morning or afternoon and one might have to go to the Quartermaster two or three times, certainly until he found him. Once having a certificate it often happened that the service at the ticket window was so slow that the soldier did not reach his turn before it was time for the train to leave. 
When I was getting my tickets at N.Y. for Atlanta a private presented his certificate (it was then about midnight). The agent said he could not accept it as the form had been changed. It was impossible for the man to see the quartermaster until the next morning, and even then would not know where to find him. If I had not given him $5.00 he would have missed his train and been A.W.O.L.

Many other things of a similar nature happened. 
On the other hand many kind things were done for the privates. 
Have seen people buying candy and papers for them. 
Have seen boys asking for directions and the man or woman ask them to get into their car and they would take them to their destination. 

From MS-397, Box 1, Folder 7. To read the diary in its entirety, visit Rauner Special Collections Library and ask to see the Harry Goodall papers (MS-397).

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