Library Teaching Quarterly: WI16

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

House Librarians
by Laura Barrett, Director of Education & Outreach

Founders Day -- School House

A student signs the School House book during Founders Day in Baker-Berry Library.

On February 26, Dartmouth’s new housing communities were launched! All current non-graduating students were invited to Founders Day at Baker-Berry Library where they learned their house affiliations, met their house professors, signed the house founders books, and received house scarves and t-shirts. The Library’s role in the new house system runs deeper than being the happy hosts to Founders Day, though. Each of the house communities has its own house librarian. The house librarians will be active members of the house communities and will partner with house professors to enrich the intellectual engagement of the communities.

House Librarians

House Librarians, from L to R: Andi Bartelstein (South House), Ridie Ghezzi (McLaughlin Cluster), Laura Barrett (West House), Jill Baron (East Wheelock House), Katie Harding (School House), Pamela Bagley (North Park House), Caitlin Birch (Allen House)

Biomedical Writer’s Retreat
by Heather Johnson, Research and Education Librarian

Matthews-Fuller Health Sciences Library

Matthews-Fuller Health Sciences Library

The Biomedical Libraries held its first Biomedical Writer’s Retreat January 29-30, 2016. The purpose of the retreat was to support researchers in the process of manuscript preparation; the retreat organizers provided access to writing support, research assistance, and a quiet space to facilitate the writing process. To help participants develop their writing skills, the retreat was structured to balance protected writing time and programming. The program included time with a writing specialist who met individually with each participant to give feedback on a sample from their draft manuscript and to discuss steps to improve logic, clarity, and the writing process. The Biomedical librarians also met with each participant to discuss best practices for literature searching, strategies to increase article and personal research impact, and things to consider when selecting a journal for manuscript submission. Participants also attended three seminars, one of which was led Jen Green and Barbara DeFelice from the Library’s Scholarly Communication, Publishing and Copyright program. A full description of the event and the agenda are available online.

Participants provided positive feedback on all aspects of the retreat, and provided suggestions to improve future iterations of the retreat. The Biomedical Libraries hope to offer a second retreat this summer.

30 Tools for 30 Days
by Katie Harding, Physical Sciences Librarian
30tools30days During winter term, librarians in the Kresge Physical Sciences Library used their blog to share ideas with the Dartmouth community about some exciting tools in scholarly communication. 30 tools for 30 days is a series of blog posts about 30 innovative websites, programs, and apps designed to assist researchers in each of six phases of the research cycle – discovery, analysis, writing, publication, outreach, and assessment.

Kresge librarians Katie Harding, Lora Leligdon, and Jane Quigley identified tools that would be of interest at Dartmouth, and each day posted a synopsis of a new tool. Inspiration for the blog series came from the poster 101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication: The Changing Research Workflow by Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer at Utrecht University. The 30 tools for 30 days posts can be found on the Kresge Physical Sciences Library and Cook Mathematics Collection blog.

DartmouthX: Creation
by Memory Apata, Music Library Specialist

The American Renaissance team on site in Salem, MA.

The American Renaissance team on site in Salem, MA.

The American Renaissance: Classic Literature of the 19th Century, a massive open online course (MOOC) by DartmouthX, opened for students around the world February 16th, 2016. The course is being taught by Professors Jed Dobson and Donald Pease, who also taught a residential version of the course by the same name in the Winter 2016 term. The course explores seven authors from the antebellum period: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Herman Melville, and Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Substantial contributions from Library staff were key components in the development of the MOOC. As the subject specialist for English, Laura Braunstein was a member of the course team from the beginning, consulting on course development, reading selection, and learning goals. Barbara DeFelice, Director of Digital Resources and Scholarly Communication, consulted on rights for secondary reading materials, including essays by the professors. Jay Satterfield, Head of Rauner Special Collections Library, presented in a video titled, “The Plurality of the Whale,” in which he examines different editions of Moby Dick to discuss how the physical manifestation of a text affects the student’s reading of that text. For example, if a book is marketed as a classic, the student often recognizes the book as such and disregards any moments of misunderstanding as a fault of their own rather than a fault of the text. You can read more about the fall 2015 exhibit on the various and diverse editions of Moby Dick in Rauner’s collections. Memory Apata, Music Library Specialist, is the lead teaching assistant for the MOOC and curated an exhibit in the Paddock Music Library called “Music and the Writers of the American Renaissance.” The exhibit runs through April 9th and showcases scores, books, recordings, and video of music inspired by the authors being read in the course.

Baker Tower

Author Rights: What are Yours?

Simbolo_CAuthors who want to share the results of their research and scholarship with a wide audience may find it odd that we’re addressing “author rights” in this blog.  Many authors think that once they write something and publish it, they can share it with whomever they please. But due to a long tradition of copyright transfer or license for works to publishers, this is often not the case.

Most authors don’t begin their research and writing with a consideration of what rights they would like to retain once the work is published.  In fact, after spending months or years researching and writing an article or book, submitting it to a journal, waiting for a response, and celebrating a publication acceptance, the publisher’s required copyright agreement may feel like an afterthought. In many cases, authors forget that the rights to their published work are theirs until they give them away (via a copyright agreement).  Often, the agreement is quickly signed, the work gets published, and the author is satisfied — until they think of a way that they’d like to reuse their work in subsequent months or years.  If this happens, librarians in the Scholarly Communication program are available to help authors understand the agreement they signed and provide advice on how authors can communicate with their publishers about rights.  There are also resources that we can recommend to assist authors in the early stages of the publishing process.

Ideally, an author would consider where to submit their work for publication based on what rights they’d like to retain.  If you are interested in exploring that for books and book chapters, we can help you modify your contract, based on prior experiences.  If you are interested in exploring that for journals, a great starting place is SHERPA/RoMEO, an easy-to-use, free, online resource that helps authors understand key points within a publisher’s copyright agreement.

Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have questions:
Barbara DeFelice, Program Director for Scholarly Communication, Copyright, and Publishing
Jen Green, Digital Scholarship Librarian
http://www.dartmouth.edu/~library/schcomm/

“Almost Human” is Open Access: OA Publishing Provides Rapid & Broad Dissemination of Key Discovery

F9.mediumThe fascinating discovery presented by Professor Lee Berger at Dartmouth on November 16th, “Almost Human—the Discovery of Homo naledi”, is truly remarkable for many reasons. The significant new discovery of the Homo naledi skeletons in the Rising Star Cave, and the complex collaboration that brought this discovery to light, make a gripping story of exploration, bravery, and science. But this is also a story of a transformation in thinking about scholarly publishing that is needed to forward understanding of a new species. As noted in National Geographic, “In paleoanthropology, specimens are traditionally held close to the vest until they can be carefully analyzed and the results published, with full access to them granted only to the discoverer’s closest collaborators. By this protocol, answering the central mystery of the Rising Star find—What is it?—could take years, even decades. Berger wanted the work done and published by the end of the year. In his view everyone in the field should have access to important new information as quickly as possible.”

To this end, two of the scientific research papers resulting from this discovery have been published in the open access journal eLife. A new journal, eLife provides open peer review and rapid publishing services on a state of the art platform. It provides researchers with high quality publishing that reaches a broad audience, and is supported by a collaboration of funders and researchers from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Max Planck Society, and the Wellcome Trust.

The lead researcher, Lee Berger, and the others on this project, including Dartmouth’s Associate Professor of Anthropology Jeremy DeSilva, knew the skeletons in the Rising Star Cave constituted a very important discovery and wanted the work broadly available and published in the best journals. Through the open access eLife articles and public access to the specimen files on MorphoSource, anyone with a 3D printer can make and study the fossils! The two eLife papers have already been cited in the published literature, and the metrics for usage provided by the platform give insight into the rapid spread of knowledge of these papers through social media as well.

elife-identity-header The articles in eLife are:

Homo naledi, a new species of the genus Homo from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa, by Lee Berger et al                DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09560 Published September 10, 2015 Cite as eLife 2015;4:e09560

Geological and taphonomic context for the new hominin species Homo naledi from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa, by Paul HGM Dirks et al DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09561 Published September 10, 2015 Cite as eLife 2015;4:e09561

John Hawks, in his piece “Homo naledi fossil discovery a triumph for open access and education” in The Conversation September 28th 2015, describes why the open access approach is so important to education.

“Not only the public benefits from scientific open access; science itself benefits. Showing the process of science in action, we create better tools for educators to equip students with the scientific method.”

For information about support for open access, public access, and open education, see Dartmouth College Library’s Scholarly Publishing and Communication Research Guide.

Open Dartmouth: Research, Data, Code, Ideas

Screen Shot 2015-05-31 at 8.57.31 PMA new exhibit in Berry Main Street, “Open Dartmouth: Research, Data, Code, Ideas,” highlights faculty and researchers at Dartmouth who believe in the importance of sharing their work freely.  This exhibit follows on the heels of the Dartmouth Arts & Sciences faculty’s recent adoption of an open access policy, yet seeks to broaden the notion of what “open” means by highlighting diverse types of scholarly sharing.  The faculty and researchers featured in this exhibit describe in their own words how and why they make their work available on the open web.  By presenting the rationale for why these researchers choose “open,” this exhibit aims to foster critical awareness about access to knowledge in today’s digital environment.

Members of the Education & Outreach committee and the Working Group on Open Access, including Jill Baron, Sarah Scully, Shirley Zhao, Barbara DeFelice, Laura Barrett and Janifer Holt, collaborated on producing this exhibit, soliciting participation from a wide range of campus scholars.  Special thanks goes to Sarah Scully and Dennis Grady for the poster design.

The Open Dartmouth that you currently see is just the beginning of a series of physical exhibits featuring Dartmouth faculty and researchers.  We welcome the opportunity to feature more scholars, whether they be faculty, students, or staff.  So tell us, why do YOU share your work?  Let us know, and we’ll include you in part 2 of “Open Dartmouth”, scheduled for Fall 2015. We welcome recommendations too!  Please contact Jill Baron or Barbara DeFelice.

Inaugural Library Research in the Sciences Award Presented at Wetterhahn Science Symposium

Two hundred thirty-two undergraduates participated in the Wetterhahn Science Symposium, held Thursday, May 28 in the Life Sciences Center, which for the first time included an award presented for Library Research in the Sciences. Two students, Annie Fagan ’15 and Mallory Rutigliano ’17, each won an award, which was presented by Dean of Libraries and Librarian of the College Jeff Horrell.

From The Dartmouth:

“This year, the winner of the symposium’s inaugural Library Research in the Sciences Award was Annie Fagan ’15, whose senior honors thesis was on the tropical dry forest streams across a land-use gradient in Costa Rica. Lora Leligdon, librarian at Kresge Physical Sciences Library and organizer of the award, said that the competition, new this year and judged by a panel of College librarians, was meant to encourage students to reflect on the research and inquiry components of their scientific question.
‘We want to hear about the student’s reflective learning process,’ she said. ‘We want to see them connect their library research with scientific research.'”

Winners of the Library Research Award, as well as the winners of the Wetterhahn/Sigma Xi science poster competition, will have their certificates or posters displayed in Kresge Library for the coming year and will also be featured in brief video interviews where they will talk about their research experience.

Congratulations to all who helped make this award happen, most notably Lora Leligdon, with help and support from others in Kresge Library, the Biomedical and Feldberg Libraries, the Library’s Education & Outreach program, the Library’s administrative office, and the Friends of the Library, who sponsored the cash awards.

Open Access Week 2014

Learn about new tools and opportunities during Open Access Week with information tables and workshops around campus all week long!

Mon
10/20
Tues
10/21
Wed
10/22
Thurs
10/23
Fri
10/24
Info Tables Open Source
Thayer MacLean Atrium
10:30am-12:30pm
Open Arts
Baker Library Main Hall
2-4pm
Open Data
Fairchild Tower Pendulum
10:30am-12:30pm
Open Science
LSC Gallery
9-11am
Open Education
Novack Café
9:30-11:30am
Events Know Your Copyrights
DCAL
12-1:30pm
Pathways to Open Research
DCAL
12-1:30pm

Stop by the information tables to learn about open access, publishing, copyright, author rights, open education and more; pick up materials; and make something Open! We will be talking about support for open access journal publishing fees (which is provided by the Compact on Open Access Publishing Equity fund), the Dartmouth Author’s Amendment, the Faculty Open Access Policy Resolution, and current trends in publishing and scholarly communication.

In addition, the Know Your Copyrights workshop will help you answer the question: “Can I post my publications in full text on….my web site, my departmental website, the institutional web site, my course site, sharing sites such as Mendeley, Academia.edu, ResearchGate or.. ?Please sign up here as lunch is provided.

In Pathways to Open Research, Dr. Kes Schroer will wrap up Open Access Week events by sharing her experiences at the “Open Science for Synthesis” program and offer insights on the power of open access, open data and open source for rapid, reproducible scholarship. Following Dr. Schroer’s remarks, we will have a roundtable discussion about all things open, including music, art, literature, education, and more. Please sign-up as lunch is provided.

More details: http://www.dartmouth.edu/~library/schcomm/OAWeek2014.html

Download the flyer here.

Feldberg Library Perspectives

Amongst the many writings, now on a daily basis, about research data management comes this from Digital Science.

In particular I noticed their research report that asks questions such as “do discovery layers increase usage?” (the answer is “generally, yes, but…”) and “what keeps researchers awake at night?” (including increasing competition for faculty positions and mandates to make research output open and freely available).

A very thoughtful presentation and report, and a publication series that’s worth following!

Faculty Research Seminars – Data for Health Policy Analysis

The Dartmouth College Library provides access to a wealth of online data that can be used for health policy analysis. John Cocklin, Economics and Social Sciences Data Librarian, will discuss library tools available to you, such as Proquest Statistical Insight and Social Explorer, that can be used to find data. He will also discuss sources of data, many of them hidden from a standard Google search. The talk will start nationally with sources such as the U.S. Census Bureau and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and will move internationally to the World Bank and World Health Organization.Title: Data for Health Policy Analysis

Date: Wednesday, June 18, 2014
Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Presenter: John Cocklin
Location: DHMC, Borwell 658W
Host: Biomedical Libraries
Registration: Registration is required for this event.

 

Try Scopus for Research and Citation Analysis

Try Scopus

Dartmouth faculty, students and staff have access to Scopus until May 31st as a free trial.  Scopus, like Web of Science, indexes peer-reviewed literature in a broad range of fields, with deep coverage of science, technology, and medicine.

Use Scopus in your research and citation analysis work during May, and let us know what you think of this resource!

WE NEED YOUR FEEDBACK!  Please use this link to send us your feedback.

Use Scopus to:

  • Find current research in a wide range of fields, including interdisciplinary, collaborative and global work
  • Search for work by specific researchers or by those from specific institutions
  • Explore  the history of citations to a particular paper or to an author; download citation counts
  • Identify collaborators, both existing and potential
  • Track, analyze, and visualize research using tools within Scopus
  • Find publications supported by grant funds (2013 forward)

See the Scopus Quick Reference Guide for More Features

Scopus URL:  http://www.scopus.com

Questions or comments?  Peggy Sleeth, Associate Director/Information Resources.

Dartmouth LaTeX Users Group

Announcing the formation of a Dartmouth LaTeX Users Group! We have an internal SharePoint site to share files and to hold discussions. Have a template for a thesis to share? Have questions about getting started? Come join the online community! Click here to send me an email request; please use your Dartmouth email.