How to Search for Internships over Winter Break

Preparing to kick-off an internship search over break?1207114_door_1-150x150

If it’s your first time looking for internships at Dartmouth, here’s a quick overview of Center for Professional Development resources you can use in your search.

  1. Where to Find Internship Listings: Log into DartBoard, accessible through the right-hand menu of the Center for Professional Development homepage. If you haven’t logged into DartBoard before, you’ll need to use your Dartmouth ID to set up an account. To receive regular Blitz Bulletins highlighting opportunities in areas of interest, subscribe to Career Services Emails in the My Profile settings of DartBoard. 
  2. You’ll find a list of internships employers have posted through the “Jobs & Internships” tab. Use the Advanced Search feature and select “Internship” under Position Type to find additional internship listings. If you see an internship listed in the tab under our recruiting program and would like to apply, visit the Recruiting section of our website to learn more about how our recruiting program works and about how to apply. (Note: The first deadline to apply for internships through the recruiting program is January 14, so you have plenty of time to meet with a Career Advisor after classes start if you have questions.)

  3. You can also see additional Internship listings if you search under the “More Jobs and Internships” tab in DartBoard. Be sure to check out leads from the National Internship Consortium (NIC); you’ll also find links to internship boards with government and non-profit opportunities. You can also find reviews of internships held by other Dartmouth students through the Internship Feedback Database.

Want to take a stab at putting together or refining your resume before you get back to school? Check out our all-new Resume Guide in the Resource Library of DartBoard. While you’re there, you can also download our handout on how to navigate DartBoard to find jobs and internships. (You must log into DartBoard for access to the Resource Library.)

Tips for the Transition going from Student to Staff: Rockabye Baby

This is the first in a five part series that provides a tip about the transition from college student to full time employee.

Going from school to work is no small task. No longer can you rely on your 30 minute power nap after lunch or drop everything to grab a cup of coffee with a buddy. A job is 8 straight hours (ok minus the one we get for lunch) of work. Non stop work. It’s the kind of work that you have to constantly use your brain and your energy in order to succeed. I have found these few tips to have helped me out TREMENDOUSLY during my transition from student to full time worker.

Get sleep! That can literally never been said enough, sleep, sleep, sleep, sleep, sleep… you get my point.

That may be one of the most overrated things ever, SLEEP. As a college student I prided myself on being able to run off of 3 hours of sleep. Now, 3 hours won’t get me out of bed in the morning. It is important that you realize that sleep really is a necessity. During school I could take a 30 minute power nap if need be to refuel for the rest of my day.When at my job I don’t have such opportunities to take breaks. I am constantly going from the time I step in the door till the moment I leave (and sometimes even after that).

There have even been studies that document just how crucial sleep is to be able to create a productive career in any field!

http://www.pennenergy.com/articles/pennenergy/2013/10/energy-industry-sleep-more-increase-your-workday-productivity.html

Sleep time is important and it is crucial for you to be able to put your best foot forward with all tasks that you do. Getting into a sleep schedule and keeping that schedule (even on the weekends!) is critical to feeling rested and restored for the day at work ahead of you.

Eyes wide shut until next time,
Jennifer McGrew ’13
#youngalumnichronicles

How to End a Conversation

Have you even been standing during a conversation and thought to yourself, “now how am I going to get out of this one…”  It is always nice to have a list of phrases that you can pull out if the situation ever arises. The Culture and Manners Institute came up with a great list of lines that you can use to politely (and quickly) end a conversation in almost any situation.

Aftecareertips13-150x150r shaking the hand of whomever you are speaking with, end the conversation with:
“It was a pleasure to meet you.”
“I enjoyed speaking to you.”
“Thank you for taking the time to speak with me.”
“Thank you for your time”
“You have an impressive background and I enjoyed hearing about it.”
“Enjoy the rest of your evening.”
These are all quick and easy ways to end a conversation on a polite note. Not all conversations will be slam dunks, but all conversations are a way to build (and keep) a good reputation out there.

 

This is my first post for the Center for Professional Development’s blog. I’m looking forward to starting new conversations with you. If you have ideas or any topic that you want to discuss let me know. …..

 

Thank you for your time,
Jennifer McGrew ’13
#youngalumnichronicles

Want to Work in Entertainment/Media? Alumni Mentoring Program…Apply by 12/14

Screen Shot 2013-12-06 at 3.20.55 PM

Are you interested in becoming a professional in the Entertainment/Media industry? Would you like to make connections with experienced professionals who can answer questions you have about their work, experience, and advice for your future? Have you demonstrated your interest in film or television through your classes, activities, and/or off terms? If so, the Dartmouth Alumni in Entertainment and Media Association (DAEMA) Mentorship Program might be just what you’re looking for!

As we all know, making connections with alumni in your chosen professional field is one of the best ways to quickly launch a career. The DAEMA Mentorship Program was founded in 2009 to facilitate opportunities for students to connect with alumni working in the media and entertainment industry. This is a great opportunity for students to learn from their mentors’ vast body of knowledge accrued from many years of experience. Mentorships run for 6 months, beginning in January 2014.
 
If you think you display the hard work and dedication needed to grow and succeed in the entertainment industry and allied industries, visit http://dartmouthentertainment.org/jobs.html for more information and to get an application. Act now! The deadline for applications is December 14th, 2013. Feel free to email mentorships@dartmouthentertainment.com with any questions!