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Wondering where to find all the wonderful people and information from your Learning Design and Technology team?

DCAL and LDT Teams We are collaborating with our colleagues from across campus to bring you Teach Remotely at Dartmouth, full of resources for teaching in an online or blended environment.

Please check out this new site, and always feel free to contact us at learning.design.tech@dartmouth.edu if you'd like to talk.

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We received this recent question from a professor:

"I find that exceptions for sick, injured, and other students are hard to keep track of, and that my grading gets slowed down by me digging through my email to remember if I gave a particular person an exception. With the flu I'm needing to excuse more people. Is there a way to encode exceptions and personal deadlines in Canvas so that it automatically takes these into account?

Answer: YES!


In any Canvas assignment, when you click Edit, you’ll see a box like this at the bottom:

Click the +Add button and you’ll be able to give any student in the drop down list a different due date. You’ll notice that the “Everyone” in the box above then changes to “Everyone else”.

 

 

We all would like to create a classroom environment where productive discussion leads to learning, but how can we set up students for this type of success? Some students are reluctant to speak, while others have no reservations about dominating the conversation. The Discussing Discussions workshop explores the theory and practice of classroom discussions, identifying specific techniques and strategies while discussing the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Slides:
Resources:

Harvard Leading Discussions Handbook: This discussion guide was produced by The Derek Bok Center For Teaching and Learning at Harvard University for the graduate Teaching Fellows program. This guide provides an overview of the purpose of discussion in the learning process and practical tools to build productive and diverse discussions among your students. This guide is also used with Dartmouth's Learner Fellows program.

CRTL_Discussion_Worksheets.docx: The Center for Research on Teaching and Learning at the University of Michigan provides these tools for increasing inclusivity in classroom discussions at their workshops. Full of ideas for approaching difficult situations, these worksheets are a great reflection activity.

Peer Review Questions for Discussions: One technique for dealing with the dreaded problem of "participation points" is to ask students to assess each other following a discussion. This rubric can be modified to meet your own needs.

Faculty Focus Discussion Self Assessment: Looking for some great ideas on how to measure what really matters in a discussion? This article encourages student-awareness about the goals of a discussion, which increases student investment in a successful outcome.

Universal Design for Learning Guidelines: The Universal Design for Learning framework asks you to consider multiple means of engagement in a discussion: perhaps you offer participation for either an in-person discussion OR one that happens asynchronously on Canvas.

Discussion Activity Idea: The Popsicle Stick Campfire (can also use Poker Chips)

Objective: Encourage all students to participate while also building empathy among dominant talkers, encouraging thoughtful deliberate contributions.

Steps: Each student receives 3 popsicle sticks at the beginning of a discussion - a green (labeled Go), a yellow (labeled Slow), and a red (labeled Stop). When the student speaks, they throw a popsicle stick into the "campfire" in the middle of the group - first green, then yellow, and finally red. Once a student has thrown their last popsicle stick, they cannot speak again until all students have thrown their sticks and the campfire discussion is blazing hot!

Note: Of course this method can be accomplished without the colors, though some students respond to the go--slow--stop.

Adam and Erin presenting on accessibility at ELI 2017At ELI 2017, Instructional Designers Erin DeSilva and Adam Nemeroff represented Team Access at Dartmouth College. Team Access is an inter-departmental group of staff from Classroom Technology, Educational Technology (Instructional Design), and Student Accessibility Services. Together, we work to improve access to learning experiences for all learners. The following is our poser we presented and the resources we frequently consult with through our work.  ...continue reading "Our Poster and Resources: Access First! Igniting a Campus-wide Universal Design Mindset"

"How can I make my site great?"  (or versions thereof) is one of the most commonly asked questions we receive.

 

Our answer is the following list of questions. We designed it to help you prepare your course according to current "best practices" in student learning and course design.  Each is also grounded in the principles of Universal Design.  You'll notice that there are many items here that you might consider addressing outside of Canvas - that's great too!

Many items include links for you to learn more about each particular topic.  Please also feel free to contact your Instructional Designer to discuss any or all of these items! ...continue reading "Leveling Up Your Course Design Using Canvas"

Student feedback offered through mid-course evaluations provides a great opportunity to improve your course, both for yourself and your students.  Read below to discover how to implement them in your class in five easy steps. ...continue reading "Mid-Course Evaluations"

When you manually add someone to your Canvas course, you can now change the role (and the associated privileges) without adding and removing the person from the course site.

...continue reading "Canvas Feature: Change User Role"

noelia.cirnigliaroby Noelia Cirnigliaro
Department of Spanish and Portuguese Studies

Professor Cirnigliaro and her literature students have created an online, virtual museum. Read below to learn about her motivations, techniques, and recommendations!

...continue reading "i. Mu.S.E.O. Interactive Museum of Spanish Early Modern Objects"

By Paul Christesen, Professor, of Ancient Greek History & Chair, Department of Classics

Note: Professor Paul Christesen has been one of the faculty teaching in the Berry Innovation Classroom (Carson 61), an active learning incubator space at Dartmouth.  

Carson 61 has turned out to be a literally transformative teaching space. I have to confess that I began the semester with the expectation that the room and its capabilities would be quite helpful but I didn’t harbor larger hopes. However, as I was watching the students work today I fully realized for the first time just how great an impact the room has had on both the students and on me, and not just in the way we work, but also in the way we think.  

First, the students sat and worked together in small groups the entire semester, in a space that facilitated face-to-face interaction among the group (while also enabling them to easily focus on another person or place outside their group as and when that was necessary).

Carson 61 made it possible for me to make small-group, active-learning exercises a fundamental part of the course. Furthermore, the students in each group got to know one another on an intellectual and personal level, and by the end of the semester had formed groups that worked very effectively and also had meaningful personal connections with each other.

Second, the easy access to equipment, in the form of both projectors and whiteboards, facilitated presentation and visualization of information, on both a small-group and whole-group basis. This equipment made working collaboratively more efficient and effective than I ever seen it happen before, and made sharing the results of collaborative work across the entire group much more feasible than in other previous classroom configurations.

Moreover, in the fifth or sixth week of the term, without planning it or really thinking about it, I started creating on-the-spot visual representations (in the form of flow charts) of the chains of historical cause-and-effect with which we were wrestling (specifically with respect to the reasons why the Persian War of 480-479 BCE and the Peloponnesian War of 431-404 BCE ended as they did).  I had not previously done this, in nearly 20 years of teaching this material, but it proved to be tremendously helpful in helping the students think clearly and carefully about the complex issues they were confronting through their readings of Herodotus and Thucydides. The students picked this up immediately and without any encouragement from me, and, leveraging the projectors and whiteboards, began using it to very good effect in the active-learning, problem-solving exercises that they were carrying out on a small-group basis.  

For our last class session, I asked each group to generate one complete cause-and-effect chain that ended with Spartan victory/Athenian defeat in 404. Every group, without any prompting from me, used their whiteboard and, over the course of 30 minutes of very active and productive discussion amongst the members of the group, created elaborate flow charts that beautifully visualized the hundreds of pages of text they had read and their analysis of that text. As I watched that unfold, it struck me that both the students and I had found a new, different, and better way of approaching texts that I’ve read literally dozens of times, and that they would certainly carry that approach to textual analysis with them going forward. It was a remarkable instance of a facilities-specific capability making itself felt in important ways even in the absence of any conscious planning.

Everything that is possible in a “normal” classroom is possible in an active learning classroom space such as this, and many things that are not possible otherwise suddenly become feasible.