Skip to content

Winter can be an especially stressful time. With the cold weather and the lack of sunlight, things can feel all the more intense. It’s important to take the time to take care of yourself (mentally, physically, and emotionally) during these months. Self-care is essential to being your best version of a student, an employee, and a friend. 

 

Get Enough Sleep at Night

Don’t let your sleep schedule fall to the wayside. Aim for a consistent sleep schedule - most people need 7-8 hours a night. Without proper REM sleep, our bodies and minds do not get the chance to properly rest and recover from the day. This can lead to mental and physical atrophy. There are many apps that you can download on your mobile device that can be used to track your nightly hours of sleep. The Dartmouth Wellness Center also offers a course called Refresh, which is a Sleep Quality Improvement Program. 

Making sleep a priority in your life will naturally make your day to day activities easier and more enjoyable. Do your best to avoid all-nighters and the extreme late-night partying. They catch up to you quicker then you might think. 

 

Get an Adequate Amount of Sunlight

Because of the cold, many students choose to stay inside and study in the warmth of the library or their dorm rooms. While this choice is understandable, staying inside at all times can lead to negative mood swings and even possibly seasonal affective disorder.

There are a number of ways to counteract these feelings from opening up your window blinds during the day time to renting out sun lamps from the Wellness and Counseling Centers on campus. If you have no pre-existing health conditions, it may also be beneficial for you to layer up with some warm clothes and have a brisk jog once in a while. 

Prioritize Working Out 

Now more than ever is the time to sign up for that exercise class or to agree to go on that run with your friend. Exercising both releases stress-relieving endorphins and promotes blood circulation which is especially beneficial during these colder months. It may also be helpful to look into yoga & Pilates, which are dorm/apartment room friendly. Aim to get between 30-60 minutes of exercise at least 3 days a week. 

Skiing, snowboarding, and ice-hockey are also really popular sports that are played by Dartmouth students. College students can get a season pass to the Dartmouth Skiway for only $99. See here for more info. 

 

Prevent Sickness 

  • Be proactive when it comes to being healthy. This can be done in a variety of ways such as: 
    • Washing your hands often
    • Disinfecting your cell phone regularly. The surface of your cell phone is one of the dirtiest that you own
    • Avoid touching your eyes, mouth, and nose. This is one of the main ways that germs are spread 
    • Eat foods with proper vitamins and minerals to boost your immune system

  •  Ease Your Symptoms if You Do Get Sick
    • Most winter illnesses simply need to run their course. Support your own healing process by staying hydrated, drinking warm soups/teas, taking a decongestant if necessary, and allowing yourself to rest/recover. If you are contagious, do your best to stay away from crowds so that you do not spread any infections. 
    • If you suspect that you may have the flu (chills, body aches, extreme fever, etc.), be sure to go to the doctor as you may need a prescription and/or further medical attention. 

 

Sherman Fairchild Physical Sciences Center

Since coming to college, I knew that I wanted to write an honors thesis. I knew I wanted to dive into research that pertained to my interests. Everyone who knows me knows these things to be true: I love cats, I hate the cold, and I am not a STEM person in any way. The idea I had of what research was involved being in a lab testing different things. Research for the humanities, social sciences, and humanistic social sciences looks a lot different. Unfortunately, there seems to be a lack of emphasis on this type of research, so it can seem difficult to know where to start.  ...continue reading "How to Begin to Approach your Humanities & Social Science Research"

The summer before freshman fall is a time of major changes and preparation that can impact students’ first term at Dartmouth. Though everyone’s transition to college is different, upperclassmen have some ideas about how to make that transition smoother. I interviewed two ‘21s, Amy Tsai and Naeem Morgan, who are at the half-way point in their Dartmouth career, and asked them to reflect on their transition to Dartmouth. ...continue reading "Transitioning to Dartmouth: Advice from ’21s"

 

Balance is probably one of the biggest things that the Academic Skills Center’s blog stresses. And as new students entering into an ivy league school, I wouldn’t be surprised if many of you feel overwhelmed by the number of organizations available to you, the number of social events you’ll be invited to, and the fast paced learning environment that the quarter system here provides.  ...continue reading "All About Balance: For 23’s"

I was a pretty high strung person during my undergraduate years. And while I’m generally a Type A personality at heart, I can’t help but think that if I had entered freshman year with some extra information, those early college days would have been more enjoyable for me. ...continue reading "7 Things I Wish I Knew During Undergrad"

Subscribe By Email

Get every new post delivered right to your inbox.

This form is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.