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Clinical Key Interface Update

As previously announced, MD Consult has been replaced by Clinical Key.  Clinical Key has all the books and journals formerly in MD Consult, and much more, including over 1,000 books, over 20,000 videos, 2.5 million medical images, 600 journals, and a point-of-care resource called First Consult. … Continue reading

Clinical Key UpdateAs previously announced, MD Consult has been replaced by Clinical Key.  Clinical Key has all the books and journals formerly in MD Consult, and much more, including over 1,000 books, over 20,000 videos, 2.5 million medical images, 600 journals, and a point-of-care resource called First Consult.

Clinical Key has released a new interface to make searching and browsing easier.

  • The search box on the opening page allows you to designate the type of resource to search: all, books, journals, First Consult, patient education.
  • The table of contents of individual books are presented more clearly with links to the chapters more apparent.
  • There are new “topic pages” with quick information on 1,400+ diseases.
  • Viewing the pdf of a book chapter still requires a personal account, one that you can create for yourself for free by clicking on “login” at the top righ of any screen.  Note that if you already have a login for Elsevier’s ScienceDirect journals you will already be registered and can use that same username and password.

Subscription to Clinical Key was made possible by the Geisel School of Medicine, the Department of Medicine, the Department of Surgery, the Department of Anesthesiology, the Patient Safety Training Center, and contributions from the Departments of Urology and Pediatrics.

Questions?  Contact Biomedical.Libraries.Reference@dartmouth.edu, stop by, or call 603-650-7660.

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