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Students compare notes on rare books at Rauner Library
Students compare notes on rare books at Rauner Library

Several parts of the Library were ‘shadowed’ last Thursday by some engaged, lively 8th grade students as part of the Upper Valley Business & Education Partnership (UVBEP)’s Job Shadow Day outreach effort, coordinated on campus by the Office of Human Resources. Rauner Special Collections Library, Kresge Physical Sciences Library, and the Library’s Acquisitions Department put together two programs and hosted five students altogether.

Students visiting Rauner Library toured the stacks, where they met Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and handled first editions of Dr. Seuss's children's books. They also learned how materials come into the library and are prepared for research use, and then participated in several classroom exercises using primary sources from the archives, rare book collections, and manuscript holdings.

Students completed an Earth Day exhibit at Kresge Library
Students completed an Earth Day exhibit at Kresge Library

Other students started the morning at Kresge Physical Sciences Library, where they researched the Library’s holdings for books related to Earth Day, ordered a book or two for the Library and used Kresge’s circulation system to check books out to create an Earth Day exhibit. They then headed over to Acquisitions, where they processed the online book orders they’d placed in Kresge; unpacked a box of newly arrived books, checking them against the invoice for accuracy; and entered a book in the Library’s acquisitions module. Students also toured the Cataloging & Metadata and Preservation Departments, learning about the ‘behind-the-scenes’ work needed before a book arrives at the Library’s New Books display. A visit to the Evans Map Room rounded out the morning.

Thanks for visiting us, JSD students! We had a great time with you and you all did a great job mirroring some of our work in the Dartmouth Library. See you next year!

The Libx Toolbar is a browser plug-in that allows you to highlight the text on a web page and search for it in a set of key databases, such as the Library Catalog, Summon, JSTOR, Borrow Direct, and more. Watch this short screencast to see how it can work for you! Learn more and install […]

libxThe Libx Toolbar is a browser plug-in that allows you to highlight the text on a web page and search for it in a set of key databases, such as the Library Catalog, Summon, JSTOR, Borrow Direct, and more. Watch this short screencast to see how it can work for you!

Learn more and install the LibX toolbar

Filed under: Tech Tips

ACS Central Science, the new, fully open access journal announced by the American Chemical Society earlier this year, moved closer to launch readiness by naming its Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Carolyn Bertozzi, a researcher in organic chemistry and chemical biology at the University of California, Berkeley.  Dr. Bertozzi is also an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical […]

New ACS journal to launch in 2015

Dr. Carolyn Bertozzi

Dr. Carolyn Bertozzi, Editor in Chief

ACS Central Science, the new, fully open access journal announced by the American Chemical Society earlier this year, moved closer to launch readiness by naming its Editor-in-Chief, Dr. Carolyn Bertozzi, a researcher in organic chemistry and chemical biology at the University of California, Berkeley.  Dr. Bertozzi is also an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

ACS Central Science will publish only 100-200 articles a year across the entire expanse of chemistry and chemistry-related fields, including areas of pure chemistry such as organic, inorganic, physical chemistry; and interdisciplinary fields such as chemical biology, life sciences and biomedicine, computational and theoretical chemistry, nanotechnology, physics and materials science, engineering, computer science, energy and atmospheric chemistry.  All articles will be freely available online immediately upon publication, and without publishing charges levied on authors.  Manuscripts will be accepted as of November, with the first issue to be published in early 2015.

These new journals join two new journals launched by the American Geophysical Union (AGU) and published in partnership with Wiley, both also highly interdisciplinary and fully open access, – Earth’s Future, and the recently announced Earth and Space Science, which will publish its first articles later this year.   [See our earlier post about AGU's range of open access initiatives, and read AGU's May 2014 announcement of Scripps Institution of Oceanography’s John Orcutt as Editor of Earth and Space Science.]

“ … that, for me, was part of the joy, – pushing myself to figure out, – oh, how DO you write a science paper, or how do you make a project work?  And then to write about that.”  - Saara-Anne Azizi ’14 Kresge Library has a lot of wonderful exhibits – from our colorful […]
Kresge's student research poster gallery

Kresge’s student research poster gallery

“ … that, for me, was part of the joy, – pushing myself to figure out, – oh, how DO you write a science paper, or how do you make a project work?  And then to write about that.”  - Saara-Anne Azizi ’14

Kresge Library has a lot of wonderful exhibits – from our colorful community art wall to the great exhibits researched and curated by undergraduate Presidential Scholars, highlighting objects from the King Collection of historic scientific instruments.

In this quiet study area in Kresge’s stacks, we display the top student research posters from two major research events on campus – the Sigma Xi/Christopher G. Reed Science Competition held in conjunction with the Wetterhahn Science Symposium, and the Graduate Student Poster Session held as part of Graduate Student Appreciation Week.

SigmaXi Poster Winners

Winners of the Sigma Xi/Christopher Reed Science competition talk about their research

This year, we videotaped short interviews with the winners of the undergrad Sigma Xi/Chris Reed competition, which we’ve posted along with the “Let’s Talk Research” interviews with the four graduate student poster winners – take a listen!

There aren’t many places on campus where you can study surrounded by such a concentrated display of talent, hard work, and motivation.  Thinking of submitting a poster, or doing honors research, or going to grad school?   Come take a look at what your peers have done and are doing!

Filed under: Exhibits, Research

Two interesting developments from the two most influential scholarly societies for chemical researchers, the American Chemical Society (ACS) and its British counterpart, the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). The RSC announced yesterday that one of its newest publications, Chemical Science (launched in 2010), will move to what’s known as ‘gold’ open access – a fully […]

RSC_LOGO_CMYK_FINAL RSCChemicalScience.jnlTwo interesting developments from the two most influential scholarly societies for chemical researchers, the American Chemical Society (ACS) and its British counterpart, the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC).

The RSC announced yesterday that one of its newest publications, Chemical Science (launched in 2010), will move to what’s known as ‘gold’ open access – a fully open journal, free for readers without a subscription.   With the publication of the first issue in 2015, all content published from that issue forward will be freely available.  In addition, for two years, the RSC will waive all Article Processing Charges (APCs), so publishing in Chemical Science will be free for authors too.

Alert viewers will recall that, several months ago, the ACS announced several major open access initiatives (‘ACS Announces Moves to Expand Open Access,’ November 7, 2013) including the launch of a new, fully open ‘gold’ OA journal, to be called ACS Central Science.

OA-centralscienceThough ACS has not opted to waive APC charges, it has created a system of credits for authors publishing in ACS journals that can translate into OA publication in ACS Central Science or any other ACS journal (the corresponding RSC program is called “Gold for Gold” – a voucher system offering vouchers to RSC authors who (and here’s the kicker) are affiliated with institutions subscribing to the premium, aptly-named “Gold,” subscription package (also known as a ‘big deal’ – a bundle of journal subscriptions for a package price that (it turns out) is highly variable among institutions – ‘On the Cost of Journal Bundles,’ June 17, 2014).

Two models, both free of subscription barriers to readers, with somewhat different funding mechanisms and administrative back-ends, and clearly an unspoken (but unmistakeable) scramble to claim the title “first in chemistry open access publishing.”   Not a bad place to be!

BTW Dartmouth authors should recall that COPE funding is available to pay author fees for publication in ANY gold (fully open access) journal.

 

Filed under: Chemistry, Publishing

KRESGE LIBRARY…THE FIRST FORTY YEARS Next time you’re in Kresge, take a look at our latest exhibit chronicling our forty years in Fairchild. Highlights include the many physical changes throughout our history, and even evidence of our own little brush with nature in the form of a flood in our stacks. And at the tender […]

Looking Back ...

Looking Back …

KRESGE LIBRARY…THE FIRST FORTY YEARS

Next time you’re in Kresge, take a look at our latest exhibit chronicling our forty years in Fairchild. Highlights include the many physical changes throughout our history, and even evidence of our own little brush with nature in the form of a flood in our stacks. And at the tender age of forty, we believe we deserve cake, so look for an announcement in the fall and come join us!

Photo exhibit curated by Lisa Ladd, Kresge Physical Sciences Library, and Tracy Snow, Rauner Special Collections Library.

Filed under: Kresge

Ever tried to browse the Kresge Undergraduate Thesis collection?  At its previous location it was an exercise in agility as you tried not to disturb other patrons studying next to the shelves. Never fear!  The Thesis collection has now moved to the wall adjacent to the conference room at the beginning of the Kresge stacks.  […]
2014-06-11 10.08.10

Chem Abstracts’ New Location …

Ever tried to browse the Kresge Undergraduate Thesis collection?  At its previous location it was an exercise in agility as you tried not to disturb other patrons studying next to the shelves.

Never fear!  The Thesis collection has now moved to the wall adjacent to the conference room at the beginning of the Kresge stacks.  You can now browse the collection with ease.

2014-06-11 10.06.54

Undergraduate and Masters’ Theses Now Easy to Reach!

“What are you going to put on the empty shelves where the theses used to be?”  We are so glad you asked, because we have moved some of our major historical reference sets, including Chemical Abstracts, Landolt-Börnstein, Gmelin, and the TRC Spectral Data reference volumes to fill those empty shelves.

As always, if you are looking for something in our collection and can’t locate it, ask the friendly staff behind the circulation desk.

-  Lisa Ladd,
Kresge Collections Specialist

Filed under: Kresge

Graduating this June? Here’s what you need to know about your library account! All library materials are due by 7pm on Wednesday June 4th for graduating students.  Check your library account online to verify that it is clear.   Payments after May 9th may only be made by CASH or money order at Kresge Library;  you […]
Check Your Library Account!

Check Your Library Account!

Graduating this June? Here’s what you need to know about your library account!

All library materials are due by 7pm on Wednesday June 4th for graduating students.  Check your library account online to verify that it is clear.   Payments after May 9th may only be made by CASH or money order at Kresge Library;  you may pay by credit card at Baker Berry (even if it is for a Kresge Library charge).

Did you know that Dartmouth alumni (which you are about to become) have many library privileges?   Read more about setting up an alumni account  (note -  you must clear all current library obligations before applying for an alumni account).  Alumni accounts will be available at Baker Berry Circulation after 12pm on June 9th.

Important deadlines:

9 May 2014 – No more checks can be accepted, nor any new charges placed against a students DA$H account.
4 June 2014 – All books are to be turned in by 7pm this day for all graduating students.
7 June 2014 – Staff will be available at Baker-Berry from 10 AM to 11 AM to handle account clearances. This is the VERY LAST CHANCE for students to get their library account cleared so they may receive their diploma. NO EXCEPTIONS.
9 June 2014 – Alumni Accounts for new graduates available at Baker-Berry Circulation after 12 pm.

Filed under: Kresge, Library - General

Timed to coincide with Earth Week?  Who knows?   Regardless, the recent announcement from the American Geophysical Union is an important statement from that society (publishers of many prestigious and highly regarded scholarly journals in earth and space science research, notably the Journal of Geophysical Research family of journals). AGU announced two major steps in making its […]

AGU logoTimed to coincide with Earth Week?  Who knows?   Regardless, the recent announcement from the American Geophysical Union is an important statement from that society (publishers of many prestigious and highly regarded scholarly journals in earth and space science research, notably the Journal of Geophysical Research family of journals).

AGU announced two major steps in making its published research more accessible to scientists and the public:

  • Beginning 1 May, access to all AGU journal content and Eos from 1997 to content published 24 months ago will be made freely available. This change will apply to all articles and supplementary materials from journals that are not already open access, and it currently represents more than 80,000 articles and issues of Eos.  Additional content will continue to become open every month, on a 24-month rolling cycle.
  • In addition, AGU has joined an innovative initiative in the UK, Access to Research, that provides patrons of U.K. public libraries instant online access to journal content from 1997 to the present at the library.

AGU also publishes three fully open access journals – JAMES, Earth’s Future, and the recently announced Earth and Space Science, which will publish its first articles later this year.  (Read the complete AGU press release here.)

In addition to furthering AGU’s mission “to advanc[e] the Earth and space sciences for the benefit of humanity through its scholarly publications, conferences, and outreach programs,” there is recent evidence that scholarly journals’ impact, as well as access, can increase (if modestly) through the removal of subscription paywalls, – particularly for highly ranked journals, in the upper tiers of their disciplines.   The impact of open access on scholarly citations is a much studied, complex and controversial issue; this recent study (McCabe & Snyder, 2014) uses an econometric model that rigorously controls for variables in article quality, age, and secular trends in citations using journal panel data.

———————-

McCabe, Mark J., and Christopher M. Snyder. 2014. “Identifying the Effect of Open Access on Citations Using a Panel of Science Journals.” Economic Inquiry doi:10.1111/ecin.12064.  (Article preprint available at SSRN, the Social Science Research Network preprint server:   SSRN Scholarly Paper ID 2269040. Rochester, NY: Social Science Research Network. http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2269040).

Abstract: An open-access journal allows free online access to its articles, obtaining revenue from fees charged to submitting authors. Using panel data on science journals, we are able to circumvent some problems plaguing previous studies of the impact of open access on citations. We find that moving from paid to open access increases cites by 8% on average in our sample, but the effect varies across the quality of content. Open access increases cites to the best content (top-ranked journals or articles in upper quintiles of citations within a volume) but reduces cites to lower-quality content. We construct a model to explain these findings in which being placed on a broad open-access platform can increase the competition among articles for readers attention. we can find structural parameters allowing the model to fit the quintile results quite closely.

Also of interest:

“The Effect of Open Access and Downloads (‘hits’) on Citation Impact: A Bibliography of Studies.” 2014. Accessed May 9. http://opcit.eprints.org/oacitation-biblio.html.

Filed under: Earth Sciences, Publishing

A round-up of sites describing useful and popular chemistry apps for mobile devices: Mobile Science lists a range of popular apps in chemistry and other disciplines (physics, biology, math) with brief descriptions and up- and down-votes. The SciMobileApps wiki has an extensive list of chemistry apps, as well as other disciplines.   Check out The […]
MobileApps

Image used under a CC BY-SA Creative Commons license

A round-up of sites describing useful and popular chemistry apps for mobile devices:

goldstar2Mobile Science lists a range of popular apps in chemistry and other disciplines (physics, biology, math) with brief descriptions and up- and down-votes.

goldstar2The SciMobileApps wiki has an extensive list of chemistry apps, as well as other disciplines.

goldstar2  Check out The Mobile Chemist & Chemical Engineer from Stanford’s Swain Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Library.   Arranged by category including Formulas, Structures, Reactions; Journals, Magazines, News; Structure Drawing; 3D Visualization; Calculating & Graphing  and so on.

Don’t forget Browzine!   goldstar2Licensed by the Library, Browzine delivers the most recent issue of thousands of academic journals to your iPad or Android tablet.   Select journals you follow and arrange them on a ‘bookshelf’ so they’re always at your fingertips.  Save citations and pdfs to Zotero, MendeleyDropbox and other services for offline reading.   (Follow setup instructions to configure Browzine to recognize your Dartmouth journal access.)

 

Further reading:

Filed under: Chemistry, Science, Tech Tips