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This term Dartmouth College Library is proud to promote an exhibit by our current Edward Connery Lathem '51 Special Collections Fellow, Jaime Eeg '18, titled "Let's Get Lunch: An Exhibit for the Discerning Palate." The exhibit highlights cookbooks from our rare book collections and will be on display at Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall, upstairs in the Class of 1965 Galleries, from April 5th through June 7th, 2019.

We all need food. Without it, we cannot survive. Yet the human relationship with food is intricate, complex, and varies widely across individuals and cultures. Our relationship with food can be at once deeply personal and private while also serving as a bridge to connect with others, sometimes meaningfully and sometimes just superficially. We've all heard the old platitude, "let's get lunch sometime," a statement upon which potential connections can either flourish or wither. Given the opportunity, food has the power to draw us in and connect us with each other, just as cookbooks can connect us to the people and cultures who created them.
Food can also help us build communities. Shared experience helps create strong foundations between individuals and larger groups of people, and shared meals are a common avenue for those experiences. Just as food helps us build meaningful connections across groups, an understanding of the food from another culture or time helps foster deeper, meaningful understanding of those cultures and times. Cookbooks can offer a valuable way to access that potential for understanding.
And food can simply be fun! Cooking and cookbooks can be artistic or experimental, and cooking or eating together complements and strengthens existing relationships. Meals are an excellent excuse to spend quality time with people we care about. After all, we all need food.

If you're hungry for more about food and Dartmouth, come  take a look at the selected recipes at Special Collections. Also, stay connected on social media for updates about opportunities to sample some actual treats made from the recipes in the exhibit. If you can't make it over to the exhibit in person, you can read more about it online here.

On April 2ndthe Dartmouth College Library continued its annual tradition of hosting student visitors as a part of Career CLiC’s Job Shadow Day, an event started in 1999 that has connected 160 schools to over 1,200 employers in New Hampshire and Vermont. This year, Rauner Special Collections Library had the pleasure of introducing three energetic and studious 8th graders from Lebanon Middle, Cornish Middle, and Crossroads Academy to research with primary source materials and rare books. 

Rauner staff Jaime Eeg, Edward Connery Lathem ’51 Special Collections Fellow, andMyranda Fuentes, Institutional History Research Specialist, began the morning with a transcription exercise using letters dating back to the 16th, 18th, and 19th centuries. After deciphering each of their letters, the students came together as a group to transcribe 1794 letter from George Washington to Alexander Hamilton. 

Students followed Jaime and Myranda into Rauner’s closed stacks to learn about the college archives and the Dartmouth College Library's numerous manuscript and rare book collections. Alex Liston, Oral History Specialist, joined the group to introduce the students to our recently-acquired volumes of Gardner’s photographic sketch books of the American Civil War. The stacks tour was arguably the most fun part of the morning, as both library staff and the visiting students got carried away selecting progressively cooler materials from the shelves, from illuminated manuscripts, to Shakespeare’s 1st folio, to the original manuscript of Robert May’s Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer. 

During their visit, the students never ran out of questions, which ranged from questions about specific materials or period in history to more broad questions about information accessibility. As we dropped students off for a pizza lunch, one student remarked, “That was so much fun!” Perhaps a future special collections librarian was born in the stacks on Tuesday! 

Written by Myranda Fuentes, Institutional History Research Specialist, and Jaime Eeg, Edward Connery Lathem '51 Special Collections Fellow. 

Every year, three Dartmouth College Library Fellowships provide opportunities for recent graduates to explore different types of careers in libraries and to gain practical experience.

The  Edward Connery Lathem '51 Digital Library Fellowship provides an opportunity for a graduating student or current graduate student of Dartmouth College to spend a year learning and contributing to aspects of digital library production, delivery, assessment and preservation. The fellowship may be tailored to the individual interests of the candidate where their skills support the mission of the developing Digital Library Program.

The Jones Memorial Digital Media Fellowship provides an opportunity for a graduating student or recent graduate of Dartmouth College to spend a year learning digital media technology as applied to the academic curriculum and careers in librarianship. The fellowship may be tailored to the individual interests of the candidate where their skills support the mission of the Jones Media Center.

The Edward Connery Lathem ’51 Special Collections Fellowship offers recent Dartmouth graduates an opportunity to work in Rauner Special Collections Library and gain valuable experience with archives, manuscripts and rare books. The fellow will work on a major project tailored to his or her skills and interests while gaining a general overview of special collections librarianship.

All three fellowships are one year, full-time paid positions with benefits. First consideration of applications will begin on March 27, 2019. To learn how to apply, visit the homepage of the fellowship(s) of interest.

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The Historic Accountability fellows (from left to right) Anneliese Thomas, Alexandrea Keith and Samantha Koreman.
The winter 2019 Historic Accountability fellows (from left to right) Anneliese Thomas, Alexandrea Keith and Samantha Koreman.

The Sphinx Foundation is generously funding a student research fellow in the Dartmouth Library’s Historical Accountability Student Research Fellowship pilot program. This gift will enable an additional student the opportunity to research issues related to diversity and inclusion in Dartmouth’s past. According to Peter Frederick ’65, President of the Sphinx Foundation, educating students of Dartmouth and members of the College community in the history and traditions of the College has been a key objective for many years. “Supporting the Historical Accountability program provides a perfect opportunity for Sphinx and the Library to work together to meet mutual objectives. Our members are pleased to have the opportunity to help Dartmouth.”

The pilot program awards fellowships to students to pursue topics of their choice during an off-term. The students, who receive stipends, work with materials in the college archives to produce research that will become part of the Library collection. “This is an opportunity to mine the resources that we have and use undiscovered primary sources to tell the untold stories of Dartmouth’s past,” says Dean of Libraries Susanne Mehrer.

The pilot program was initiated by the Library and funded by the Office of the Provost through the campus-wide Inclusive Excellence initiative. The original project funded three students to explore Dartmouth’s history. With the Sphinx Foundation’s generous support, a fourth fellow will now have the opportunity to be part of the program.

In the summer of 2018, the pilot’s inaugural fellow, Caroline Cook ’21, explored the career of Dartmouth’s first tenured professor, Hannah Croasdale. During the current Winter 2019 term, three more fellows are working in the archives:

Alexandrea Keith ‘20 is exploring the intersections of race and class by studying and juxtaposing the experiences of Jewish students and Black students who attended Dartmouth during the early 20th century. She will focus on the extent to which men of color, their Jewish counterparts and, particularly, lower income Black and Jewish students were integrated into campus life.

Samantha Koreman ‘20 is focusing on the historical representation and visibility of the differently abled throughout Dartmouth’s institutional history. This entails researching the experiences of the differently abled on campus and utilizing building floor plans to determine how accessible Dartmouth’s campus is to people with limited mobility.

Anneliese Thomas ‘19 is consulting the papers of Professor Errol Hill to explore the Black student experience at Dartmouth in the 1960s and 70s. She seeks to underscore the importance of representation through the stories of Errol Hill and the students whose lives he impacted so greatly.

Institutional History Research Specialist Myranda Fuentes, who is overseeing the Historical Accountability project, says “The fact that this program is so student-focused is what encouraged me to get involved. In my eyes, the Historical Accountability Program is a great opportunity for Dartmouth students to develop their research skills, while also enabling Dartmouth to engage with its past in a critical way.”

The fellows’ research findings will be made freely available through our website.

About the Sphinx Foundation

The Sphinx Foundation, a New Hampshire charitable non-profit organization, serves and supports the College, the community, and the general public through its educational and philanthropic efforts.  The Sphinx Foundation promotes education, research, and scholarship at the College, fosters the ideals of academic excellence, community service, and high moral purpose, and serves as a reservoir of Dartmouth’s history and traditions.

 

This summer, as a part of their final project, the students in Darrin McMahon's "History of Equality" class created an exhibit at Rauner Library titled "Coeds and Cohogs: The Struggle over Female Integration at Dartmouth College." Using documents curated from the archives at Rauner Library, the exhibit considers the evolution of the College’s social character in the decades since the adoption of coeducation in 1972. Each of the three cases in the exhibit represents a distinct but interrelated facet of this unfolding process. They treat, respectively, three complex and shifting perspectives: male students, women students, and the Dartmouth administration. When placed in dialogue with one another, the cases seek to explain how women's issues on campus today have been shaped by distinct instances of convergence and discord at Dartmouth for more than forty-six years.

The exhibit was curated by Matthew Ix '20, Dante Mack '20, Chris Meister '20, David Nesbitt '20, Madeline Press '20, Ian Reed '21, Rushil Shukla '20, and Dayle Wang '20, all students in Darrin McMahon’s “The History of Equality” HIST 08 class, during the Summer of 2018. It will be on display in the Class of 1965 Galleries from September 17th through November 5th, 2018.

  • Football teams 1900-1910
Help to change the dominant narrative surrounding Dartmouth’s history. Tell stories about inclusion and diversity from Dartmouth’s past that have never been told. Hone your research skills with primary sources. Contribute to a campus-wide effort to create an open and honest dialogue on campus about our past.
 
For the 2018-2019 academic year, the Dartmouth Library will be conducting a one-year historical accountability pilot initiative as part of Dartmouth's plan for Inclusive Excellence. The pilot initiative, which is based at Rauner Special Collections Library, is offering four, term-long, full-time, fully funded student research fellowships to assist Dartmouth students in exploring our collections and creating original content based upon primary sources.
 
Jaime Eeg ’18, a former Student Research Fellow, says “the fellowship allowed me to build a kind of relationship with the past that I never even realized was possible. Working with primary source material gave me a glimpse into individual perspectives I could never grasp from a history book. After spending one of my off terms researching in Rauner, I know the archives hold so many more stories waiting to be told.”

 

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This last Tuesday at the Senior Honors Thesis Showcase reception on Berry Main Street, Dartmouth College Library presented its Undergraduate Thesis Library Research Award to two undergraduate scholars for the second year in a row. Eligibility for the award is open to any student who writes a senior thesis and is majoring in the humanities, social science, and interdisciplinary fields. This award is analogous to the Library Research Award in the Sciences which has been awarded at the Wetterhahn Symposium since 2015.

Winners of the award demonstrated exceptional ability to locate, select, evaluate, and synthesize library resources (including, but not limited to, printed resources, databases, collections, web resources, and all media) and to use them in the creation of a project. They also displayed evidence of significant personal learning and the development of a pattern of research and inquiry that shows the likelihood of persisting in the future.

This year, the winners of the Undergraduate Thesis Library Research Award were Tyler Anderson and Kennedy Jensen, both members of the class of 2018.

Anderson's thesis was supervised by Ayo A Coly, Professor of Comparative Literature & African Studies. Titled, "#BlackLivesMatter, the Antithesis: #NoLivesMatter," Anderson's work applies an Afro-pessimist theoretical lens of analysis to the #BlackLivesMatter movement and concludes that, while the #BLM movement may be useful in actualizing the spiritual energy and social life of blackness, there needs to be an alternative hermeneutic for approaching revolution with a higher potential for change. The alternative Anderson posits is a new provocative lens coined #NoLivesMatter. #NoLivesMatter, as a lens, shifts priorities from constructing black power to deconstructing the power of anti-black privilege. It reorients the debate away from the language of black survivability and its negative impacts and towards the goal of throwing civil society into incoherence. This alternative does not discount the benefits of #BLM and black liberation strategies like it but rather gives attention to a more provocative analysis of black power, survivability, inter-, and intra- racial violence.

Jensen's thesis, titled "Running a Blurry Line Lived Experiences of Disordered Eating Among Female Distance Runners," pulls on macroscopic themes of American culture to expand the current models of disordered eating as constructed by existing academic approaches, specifically within the context of female distance runners. It seeks a point of entry for change by exploring the multitude of influences on these unhealthy behaviors, attempting to map the foundation upon which such pernicious attitudes are built in order to identify potential disruptive solutions to a self-perpetuating issue. As a ethnopsychological phenomenon, a complete understanding is necessarily predicated on an anthropological exploration of both the macro- and micro-contexts these behaviors are situated within. Rather than treating these illnesses as an anomaly among the very few, Jensen states that we must seek to understand the events, perceptions and pressures in athletes’ lives and subcultures that logically lead to these outcomes. After burying deep into the experiences of a small subset of individuals, her thesis reorients its view outward, using the psychopathology of a few to reflect on the western culture we ourselves are situated within — our assumptions, values, idols — a larger psychocultural patterning that, regardless of our awareness, guides our decisions and priorities. In this way, the behaviors we once recognized as deviant become a lens with which to more clearly view ourselves.

We congratulate Tyler and Kennedy for their excellent accomplishment and look forward to collaborating again with the Senior Honors Thesis Showcase to honor students who demonstrate exceptional research skills and a high level of intellectual inquiry with regard to their theses.

Winners of the Undergraduate Thesis Library Research Award

2018

Tyler Anderson '18
Kennedy Jensen '18

2017

Emily Burack '17
Megan Ong '17

On May 23rd, Dartmouth College Library presented its fourth Library Research Award in the Sciences. The Award for Library Research in the Sciences is held in conjunction with the Karen E. Wetterhahn Science Symposium and presented in partnership with the Office of Undergraduate Research and Advising (UGAR).    All students who present a poster at Wetterhahn are eligible, and submissions are evaluated by a panel of librarians from Kresge Physical Sciences and Dana Biomedical Libraries.

This award, sponsored by the Friends of Dartmouth College Library, strives to recognize students that demonstrate an exceptional ability to conduct research in the literature of their field, and who have developed an outstanding pattern of research and inquiry.

In reflecting on their research process, the winners have displayed evidence of significant personal learning and a pattern of research that shows the likelihood of persisting in the future. Winners of the Library Research Award, as well as the winners of the Wetterhahn/Sigma Xi science poster competition, will have their certificates or posters displayed in Kresge Library for the coming year and will also be featured in brief video interviews where they will talk about their research experience.

We received several outstanding submissions this year, and are pleased to announce that the winners of the Library Research Award in the Sciences are Hannah Margolis, '20 and Saemi Han, '18.

Hannah is a Sophomore Research Scholar, and  does research in the Michael Ragusa (Chemistry) lab.  Her Wetterhahn poster title is Biochemical investigation of mitochondria autophagy initiation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae.  Hannah’s submission was notable for her connection of her literature review to the scientific process and its extensive bibliography reflecting diverse sources.

Saemi is presenting her senior honors thesis work from Professor Patricia Pioli’s (Geisel) lab.  Her poster is title CDDO-Me attenuates inflammation in healthy and Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) macrophages.  Saemi’s submission was notable for her sophisticated research strategies and techniques.

Winners of the Library Research Award in the Sciences

2018

Hannah Margolis, '20

Saemi Han, '18

2017

James Howe VI, ‘17

Jessica Kobsa, ‘20

2016

Alexandra Sclafani, ‘18

Yixuan He, ‘18

2015

Annie Fagan, ‘15

Mallory Rutigliano, ‘17

 

 

 

Photo of Hina HirayamaHina Hirayama is one of Rauner Special Collections Library’s New England Regional Fellowship Consortium Fellows for the 2017-2018 academic year. Hirayama is an historian of art and culture of nineteenth-century New England. Originally from Tokyo, Japan, she received her B.A. from Amherst College and Ph.D. from the American & New England Studies Program at Boston University.

After serving as a curator at the Boston Athenaeum for over two decades, she is now working on a biography of the American scientist Edward Sylvester Morse (1838-1925), which will pay particular attention to the American context of his life and career. She is the author of "With Eclat": The Boston Athenaeum and the Origin of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2013).

Next Thursday, May 24th,  from 1:15-2:15, Hirayama will give a brief talk about her work on the Morse biography, which will be partially based upon research conducted at Rauner. The talk will be held in the Bryant Room at Rauner Library in Webster Hall and will be followed by a question-and-answer period.

 

Every year, three Dartmouth College Library Fellowships provide opportunities for recent graduates to explore different types of careers in libraries and to gain practical experience.

The  Edward Connery Lathem '51 Digital Library Fellowship provides an opportunity for a graduating student or current graduate student of Dartmouth College to spend a year learning and contributing to aspects of digital library production, delivery, assessment and preservation. The fellowship may be tailored to the individual interests of the candidate where their skills support the mission of the developing Digital Library Program.

The Jones Memorial Digital Media Fellowship provides an opportunity for a graduating student or recent graduate of Dartmouth College to spend a year learning digital media technology as applied to the academic curriculum and careers in librarianship. The fellowship may be tailored to the individual interests of the candidate where their skills support the mission of the Jones Media Center.

The Edward Connery Lathem ’51 Special Collections Fellowship offers recent Dartmouth graduates an opportunity to work in Rauner Special Collections Library and gain valuable experience with archives, manuscripts and rare books. The fellow will work on a major project tailored to his or her skills and interests while gaining a general overview of special collections librarianship.

All three fellowships are one year, full-time paid positions with benefits. First consideration of applications will begin on March 21, 2018. To learn how to apply, visit the homepage of the fellowship(s) of interest.