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In visual perception a color is almost never seen as it really is—as it physically is. This fact makes color the most relative medium in art.” –Josef Albers

Thanks to the enthusiastic support of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Yale University Press has recently launched the A&AePortal edition of Alber's Interaction of Color.

During the 1960s, Josef Albers and his wife artist Anni developed 150 silk screen prints that demonstrated how colors behaved differently depending on what color they were next to. These beautiful color prints have taught generations of artists a new way to think about color and how colors create different dialogues depending on what colors they are in close proximity with. This groundbreaking work is currently held in the Dartmouth's Sherman Art Library Special Collection

In addition to Albers’s original commentary and instruction, the A&AePortal version features high-resolution reproductions of the color plates and video of experts discussing some of the color exercises from the book (see example, below).

https://www-aaeportal-com.dartmouth.idm.oclc.org/?id=-20314

The four X';s in the print below are one color that looks like different when place next to other colors.

The A&AePortal edition of the Interaction of Color is a new way to introduce student’s to this extraordinary publication and a useful supplement to the print edition in classes.

This collection was put together by students in Christie Harner's  ENGL 62.16 class, “Victorian Faces / Facial Politics, ” this Summer. The collection highlights themes of social identity, medical history, scientific policing and detection, and racial ethnography in nineteenth-century Britain.

Servants Employment Agency
A servants' employment agency where prospective employees are having their heads phrenologically examined as to their suitability by W. Taylor

 

You can explore the collection through the Dartmouth Library's  Artstor subscription: https://library.artstor.org/#/collection/100114507

Dartmouth has added a web-based companion to the book: St. Paul’s Outside the Walls: A Roman Basilica from Antiquity to the Modern Era by  Art History professor Nicola Camerlenghi, (Cambridge University Press, 2018).

This virtual companion to Professor Nicola Camerlenghi book is part of Dartmouth's JSTOR Forum Institutional Collections in Artstor: https://library.artstor.org/#/collection/100070627

Prof. Camerlenghi's research traces nearly two thousand years of physical transformations to one of Rome's most influential churches, the Basilica of St Paul.  The history of St. Paul's is traced from before its construction in the fourth century to its reconstruction following a fire in 1823. By recounting this long history, he restores the building to its rightful place as a central, active participant in epochal political and religious shifts in Rome and across Christendom, as well as a protagonist in Western art and architectural history. He also examines how buildings in general trigger memories and anchor meaning, and how and why buildings endure, evolve, and remain relevant in cultural contexts far removed from the moment of their inception. At its core, Saint Paul's exemplifies the concept of building as a process, not a product: a process deeply interlinked with religion, institutions, history, cultural memory, and the arts. This study also includes state-of-the-art digital reconstructions synthesizing a wealth of historical evidence to visualize and analyze the earlier (now lost) stages of the building's history, offering glimpses into heretofore unexamined parts of its long, rich life.

 

Born in Paris in 1673 Bernard Picart was a French artist who spent much of his life in Amsterdam and is most well known for his book illustrations.  In a time of religious unrest in Europe, Bernard was radically committed to religious tolerance and his best known work, Cérémonies et coutumes religieuses de tous les peuples du monde, was an attempt to document religious beliefs from around the world as objectively as possible.  It is an immense work of 12 volumes and 266 engravings which he produced between 1723-1743.  Picart himself never traveled outside of Europe, but relied on written accounts and sketches from travelers to India, the Americas and other regions.

He published Receuïl de Lions in 1728  as a series of 12 small engravings 13x 20cm.  Three he drew himself from life, seven are engravings after Rembrandt drawings, and one is after Paulus Potter, a 17th century Dutch artist famous for his paintings of animals.  This small ‘pocket edition’ was so popular Picart issued a much larger edition in 1729 of 42 prints  that was  20x26.5cm.

Receuïl de Lions: dessins d’apres nature par Rembrandt et B.. Picart  1728 engraving of a lion by Bernard Picart

Sherman Art Library Special Collection N7668.L56 P53 1728

https://search.library.dartmouth.edu/permalink/01DCL_INST/1j9oqr/alma991025092119705706

Photograph of Lucas Hollister
Photograph of Lucas Hollister

In this week's edition, we speak with Lucas C. Hollister, Assistant Professor of French and Italian Languages and Literatures. In his most recent book 'Beyond Return Genre and Cultural Politics in Contemporary French Fiction', he proposes new perspectives on the cultural politics of fictions. Examining adventure novels, radical noir, postmodernist mysteries, war novels, and dystopian fictions, Hollister shows how authors like Jean Echenoz, Jean-Patrick Manchette, Jean Rouaud, and Antoine Volodine develop radically dissimilar notions of the aesthetics of 'return', and thus redraw in different manners the boundaries of the contemporary, the French, and the literary.

What is your book about?

How popular fictional forms are politicized in France, and about how these cultural forms are used to define the “contemporary.”

Where did you get your idea(s) for this book?

While I was reading literary histories and criticism, I was struck by how many of the dominant accounts of the present or “contemporary” relied on a narrative about a “return to the story” after the decline of the postwar avant-gardes in France. As an avid reader of genre fiction (of both the low and high varieties) and of French modernist literature, I found the topic fascinating. I was also skeptical of what I saw as the anti-modernist and anti-intellectual undercurrents of this argument. I started to study this topic, in short, because I wanted to orient myself in the cultural field and I wanted to think about how literature was politicized today. Eventually, this led me to take a deeper dive into the novels of a few authors—notably Jean-Patrick Manchette, Jean Echenoz, and Antoine Volodine— whom I felt represented particularly ingenious ways of working with crime fiction, mystery, war fiction, and dystopian fiction.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

I read as much as I can. Working with contemporary authors and texts means that I don’t get to do a lot of the fun archival digging that scholars from earlier periods do, but I take occasional research trips to libraries and archives in France. The spaces my work cannot do without are the spaces I find to read, the space of the classroom where I work out ideas with students, and the space of French literary culture.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

An indefinite, perhaps infinite number of hexagonal galleries. The arrangement of the galleries is always the same: Twenty bookshelves, five to each side, line four of the hexagon’s six sides; the height of the bookshelves, floor to ceiling, is hardly greater than the height of a normal librarian. One of the hexagon’s free sides opens onto a narrow sort of vestibule, which in turn opens onto another gallery, identical to the first—identical in fact to all. A spiral staircase winds upward and downward into the remotest distance. In the vestibule there is a mirror, which faithfully reduplicates appearances. Light is provided by certain spherical fruits that bear the name “bulbs.” There are two of these bulbs in each hexagon, set crosswise. The light they give is insufficient, and unceasing. Pessimistically, one might also imagine it as a screen whose real function is to read us.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

To read and write a lot. To work hard to improve how you read and write. To seek out your blind spots and deficiencies. To cultivate a network of people who can read your work critically. To be generous with yourself, trust your own intellect and follow your interests wherever they lead you.

And finally, what do you read for fun? 

I have the defect of thinking that almost everything I study and teach is fun. That said, I would love to read more Sebald, to read the pockets of Borges I haven’t yet read, and to reread Tolstoy, Flaubert, Joyce, Kafka, Woolf. I have a book project right now called Bad Natures, for which I am currently reading a lot of climate fiction and eco-horror. Recently I enjoyed reading Samanta Schweblin’s Fever Dream and Mouthful of Birds.

 

Photograph of Petra McGillen
Photograph of Petra McGillen

In this week's edition, we speak with Petra S. McGillen, Assistant Professor of German Studies. In her book 'The Fontane Workshop: Manufacturing Realism in the Industrial Age of Print', McGillen analyzes a wealth of unexplored archival evidence, including a collection of the Theodor Fontane's 67 extant notebooks, along with an array of other 'paper tools,' such as cardboard boxes, envelopes, and slips.  With this evidence, McGillen demonstrates how Fontane compiled his realist prose works.

What is your book about?

Question: How was nineteenth-century realist literature created? Answer: with a stack of newspapers, a pair of scissors, a pot of paste, and a small army of helpers! At least, this is how Theodor Fontane, Germany’s best-known novelist in the realist vein, did it. The book reconstructs his creative process, showing how he “remixed” his writings from newspapers and other popular-cultural sources under conditions of early mass media.

Where did you get your idea(s) for this book?

It all started with a lucky find in graduate school. Randomly, I stumbled upon a footnote that mentioned Theodor Fontane’s notebooks. In Germany, Fontane is as well-known as Goethe or Kafka, and I was stunned that I had never heard about his notebooks before. I followed up and realized that not much had been published about these intriguing little media of writing (in part because they were held at an archive in former East Germany and had not been freely available to scholars until the German Reunification). As soon as I could, I traveled to Germany to explore the notebooks for real—and was hooked. They were difficult to read but also extremely fascinating because they provided access to Fontane’s paper cosmos and all aspects of his authorship, containing both traces of the drafting process and of the business side of being a freelance writer. From there, the topic quickly mushroomed—I discovered more and more “paper tools” that Fontane used, such as strange, homemade envelopes with which he loosely organized his manuscripts, and began to wonder what the relationship of these tools was to the media-historical setting in which Fontane and his peers worked. Once I understood that he worked in a media landscape that in some ways resembles our own, and that he became creative by means of copying (or cutting) and pasting, it clicked with me that I had to portray him as a remix artist, because that is the most appropriate way of capturing what his creative process was all about.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

My research involves heavy-duty archival work, so one element I could not live without are manuscripts, notebooks, drafts, and other such sources! Doing archival research always reminds me of doing a puzzle: at first, what’s in the box looks like a total jumble, but as you turn the pieces over and scrutinize each one more closely, you begin to figure out how they connect, and slowly but surely, the full picture emerges. It requires a lot of stamina, or what Germans call Sitzfleisch (literally, “flesh to sit on”, but it's meant more in the sense of perseverance and the ability to sit still on one's backside for a long time), but the feeling of discovery when you begin to make those connections is thrilling.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

With more and more books, journals, and archival sources getting digitized, the library of the future will for sure shrink in physical space but expand drastically in the number of titles and items that can be accessed. On the one hand, I find this push toward digitization exciting because it will yield a whole range of new opportunities. On the other hand, I think this development will come at a cost. Libraries have never just been spaces for the storage of books; they have always also been sites where readers interact (with texts and with each other), where one can breathe and smell books, where one might meet one’s future spouse, and where one might make the unexpected, serendipitous finds that are such a vital part of research. All of this would be lost if we reduced ourselves to “digital only” models. I’m therefore hoping that the library of the future will leave room for both—the opportunities that the library as a virtual hub affords and the opportunities that arise from bringing people and books into the same place. Also, stepping into an expansive reading room that is filled to the ceiling with books feels inspiring; it takes my breath away every time. By comparison, entering an online portal feels “meh” at best.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Figure out what your most productive hours of the day are and be protective of them. Turn off your email. Spread a bucket of glue on your chair, sit down, and do not get up until you have written at least two pages.

And finally, what do you read for fun? 

The last novel that I read for fun was Tyll by Daniel Kehlmann. It’s a wild and creative take on the genre of the historical novel and tells the life of Till Eulenspiegel, a German prankster who is the protagonist of a famous early sixteenth-century chapbook. In Kehlmann's version, he makes the decision never to die, which makes for a fabulous and very entertaining narrative. Recently, I started plowing through Brian Merchant’s The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone. So far, I’ve been enjoying it tremendously. Merchant is great at disentangling the many strands that came together to make the iPhone possible and completely busts the lone-inventor myth that to this day surrounds Steve Jobs. I actually meant to read it for fun, but I find myself taking notes all the time because I really want to teach a media history class on this topic.

Every year, three Dartmouth Library Fellowships provide opportunities for recent graduates to explore different types of careers in libraries and to gain practical experience.

The  Edward Connery Lathem '51 Digital Library Fellowship provides an opportunity for a graduating student or current graduate student of Dartmouth College to spend a year learning and contributing to aspects of digital library production, delivery, assessment and preservation. The fellowship may be tailored to the individual interests of the candidate where their skills support the mission of the developing Digital Library Program.

The Jones Memorial Digital Media Fellowship provides an opportunity for a graduating student or recent graduate of Dartmouth College to spend a year learning digital media technology as applied to the academic curriculum and careers in librarianship. The fellowship may be tailored to the individual interests of the candidate where their skills support the mission of the Jones Media Center.

The Edward Connery Lathem ’51 Special Collections Fellowship offers recent Dartmouth graduates an opportunity to work in Rauner Special Collections Library and gain valuable experience with archives, manuscripts and rare books. The fellow will work on a major project tailored to his or her skills and interests while gaining a general overview of special collections librarianship.

All three fellowships are one year, full-time paid positions with benefits. First consideration of applications will begin on April 10, 2020. To apply for any or all, visit https://dartgo.org/library-fellowships.

Photograph of James E. Dobson
Photograph of James E. Dobson

In this week's edition, we speak with James E. Dobson, Senior Lecturer, Department of English and Creative Writing and Director, Institute for Writing and Rhetoric. In his most recent book 'Critical Digital Humanities: The Search for a Methodology (University of Illinois Press, 2019' he explores the opportunities and complications faced by humanists in this new era.

What is your book about?

Critical Digital Humanities interrogates the use of computation methods for studying culture from the bottom up—from object selection to the history of popular algorithms.

Where did you get your idea(s) for this book?

I simultaneously worked in literary studies and in computational science for many years—my first career was in the tech industry—and treated these interests as separate. The increasing number of humanists making use of computational methods (via what many call the “digital humanities”) pushed me to write a critical account of what I perceived to be the problems with these early methods and the prospects for a more scientific and a more humanist way of using computation to study culture. The issues raised by the computational turn in literary studies are fundamental to literary studies itself and in many ways it provokes a similar set of questions to other turning points within the history of my major field. I wanted to understand this. I wrote this book for both my colleagues and for my students. We used in the 19F term in my ENGL 64.05 “Cultural Analytics” course.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

I think of myself as an intellectual historian. I read widely and love bibliographic work, especially tracing lines of influence and missed connections. In every project I tend to think about larger frames that enable me to think about the history, forms of power, ideology, and cultural forces informing my objects and figures of interest. With this book, I wanted to have practical objects that could motivate the theoretical accounts that I wanted to produce. I reconstructed workflows from other researchers and produced my own using Python and a sharable, executable document called a Jupyter notebook. These notebooks combine code, data, visualizations, and most importantly, space for critical reflection on what is taking place within the code.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

In many ways I hope it resembles the library of yesterday and today. In my teaching and research I make use of several campus libraries. I love working in Rauner and exploring archival material—especially the discovery that can take place in a box of material. I also greatly appreciate Dartmouth’s digital library and depend upon access to scholarly journals and cataloged access to open access resources. I hope that in the future we’ll continue to have a great collection of books and archived materials along with new digital archives and databases as well as methods to preserve and share our research workflows and their products.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Read widely but make sure to have a regular return to those objects that excite you and provide inspiration in terms of their form, argument, and ambitions. Any aspiring writer might turn to Ralph Waldo Emerson’s essay “Self-Reliance” for motivation.

And finally, what do you read for fun? 

As I teach and write on many different topics almost anything can quickly turn from fun to work (which isn’t to say that work can’t be fun). This past spring I wanted to build a small boat and picked up John Gardner’s Building Classic Small Craft: Complete Plans and Instructions for 47 Boats. Gardner includes a surprising amount of narrative in this large collection of plans and essays on small boat building. As I read, I quickly noticed a shared antimodern sensibility between the late-nineteenth century sources that informed Gardner and his own moment and it takes some restraint not to write an essay about the nostalgic return of oar-powered boats in the 1970s and most certainly my own desires in my present moment.

Photograph of Zahra Ayubi
Photograph of Zahra Ayubi

In this week's edition, we speak with Zahra Ayubi Assistant Professor of the Department of Religion. She has recently received a grant from the Greenwall Foundation’s Faculty Scholars Program in Bioethics to continue her research on the intersections of bioethics, gender, and religion within the context of Islam.  Her most recent book 'Gendered Morality: Classical Islamic Ethics of the Self, Family, and Society' offers a textual-critical examination of gender in Islamic metaphysics and virtue ethics.

 

What is your book about?

This book is about the perennial concerns of how to live a moral life when so much of philosophical ethics is gendered and exclusive.

Where did you get your idea(s) for this book?

I always knew that I wanted to research concepts of gender in Islam and produce feminist work that advocates for justice. Then in graduate school I developed an interest in studying Islamic philosophical ethics as a genre. Hence, the idea for this book came together.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

My research looks like this: me sitting reclined in my office with my feet up on an ottoman. My laptop perched on a lap-desk and my browser connected to several library websites, a million tabs and files are open, and a stack of books and article printouts sit next to me with one book open on a book stand. Although I don’t have to be in this space or position to write, I usually do need to work in a warm place or need the heat to be turned way up.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

The library of the future SHOULD contain hard copy books as it does today, but I realize that housing books in limited space will not always be feasible and shipping heavy voluminous books may not be environmentally friendly. On the other hand, because libraries loan books that are to be read by multiple patrons over and over, they provide a more environmentally friendly way to get books into the hands of people than if each individual had to purchase/ship their own copies. That said, libraries of the future will probably succumb to budget cuts and stop purchasing hard copies of books, and instead expand their electronic offerings and electronic platforms of reading—it might not destroy the concept of the book, but it might cause a decline in reading habits overall.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Cultivate a daily writing practice, much like other daily rituals, and don’t worry about the initial quality of your writing. You can always revise a first draft, but if you don’t have a draft there is nothing to revise.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

If I had more time, I would read everything by G. Willow Wilson, Mohja Kahf, Laury Silvers, and other Muslim women fiction authors. I would also read the YA novels by Henna Khan, Sabaa Tahir, Alexis York Lumbard and Ausma Zehanat Khan in the secret hopes that they move to writing novels for adults. This would be both to support this community of authors, but also find representation of myself and stories familiar to me in literature.

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

Change the Subject as a Teaching Tool by Jill Baron

Change the Subject banner

Change the Subject, a film about libraries, labels, and activism, was co-directed by Dartmouth librarian Jill Baron and filmmaker Sawyer Broadley and co-produced by Dartmouth alumni Melissa Padilla ‘16 and Óscar Rubén Cornejo Cásares ‘17. The film explores the singular effort of students and librarians to change the Library of Congress subject heading “Illegal aliens,” a movement that has had a national impact.

It premiered at Dartmouth College on April 27, 2019, and since then, has had 51 public screenings, been included in two film festivals, and was broadcast on Vermont PBS, part of their “Made Here” series. The impact of the film has been widespread, but perhaps most significantly as a teaching tool in a variety of classrooms. The film has been screened to K-12 audiences as an illustration of civics in action, and is increasingly included in library and information school curricula, prompting a new generation of librarians to ponder what diversity and inclusion in libraries really mean when these values are at odds with traditional library practices.

At Dartmouth, students in the Fall 2019 course “Latinx Lives in the United States” produced Words Matter, an online exhibit about the film, delving deeper into topics such as the role of language in determining identity, and the history of immigrant rights activism at Dartmouth. Given that the film explores how libraries use cataloging and controlled vocabularies to organize information, teaching librarians are finding the film useful in terms of building critical information literacy skills in students. Baron aims to produce a teaching toolkit for the film, and hopes that the film will continue to inspire conversations about social justice, racial equity, and inclusivity in libraries and higher education.

Dartmouth Library reports on “Teaching with Primary Sources” by Morgan Swan

During the 2019-2020 academic year, the Dartmouth Library is participating in a study conducted by Ithaka S+R, a not-for-profit service that helps academic communities serve the public good and navigate economic, technological, and demographic change. The current study, titled “Supporting Teaching with Primary Sources,” is being facilitated by Morgan Swan, Daniel Abosso, and Myranda Fuentes, and has benefitted from significant contributions from Joshua Dacey before his departure. The Dartmouth Library team will partner with Ithaka S+R and twenty-five other institutions of higher learning in both the US and the UK to conduct a series of interviews with faculty who use primary sources in the classroom in some capacity.

At present, twelve Dartmouth faculty have been interviewed and transcriptions will soon be generated. Then, the Dartmouth Library team will review and code the transcripts according to certain keywords of relevance and interest. Once that’s complete, the information will be collated and used in the creation of a report that will seek to elucidate the ways in which the Dartmouth Library can provide support for faculty who want to incorporate primary sources in meaningful ways in the classroom, whether on-site or virtually.

The information gathered here at Dartmouth will also be included in a capstone report by Ithaka S+R and will be essential for the larger library profession to further understand how the support needs of instructors in teaching with primary sources are evolving. The Dartmouth Library’s local report will go live in September 2020 and Ithaka’s larger report should appear soon after.

From Script to Print by Daniel Abosso

During fall term, Daniel Abosso taught an 8-week Osher class, “From Script to Print: European Cultural Change, 1300-1600” that focused on the how European intellectual culture changed during the transition from manuscripts to printed books. Students worked with manuscript and early printed books at Rauner Special Collections Library, prints at the Hood Museum, and parchment, paper, and the hand-press at the Book Arts Workshop to understand the physical processes involved in manuscript and book production. Each week was devoted to a different theme, from anatomy and disease to the discovery of the New World. Students read primary sources that ranged widely, from a 7th century encyclopedia to a 16th century Neo-Latin epic on syphilis. One student commented, “If ever you wanted to take a journey back in time to another place, this is the course! Daniel has the amazing ability to show the works of these ancient scholars in relation to world events and perspectives, and bring these personalities to life.”

Women in Data Science: Building a longer table starts at Dartmouth by Catrina Cuadra

While women struggle for equality across disciplines, women in data science face particular challenges. They struggle to reach representation and many find themselves unhappy working in these industries, ultimately leaving. There are several places where women veer off the path to a successful data science career, often in liminal stages where women lack support. These stages include transitioning from student to master, entering the professional world, and achieving professional success. Often women lack structures and networks to turn to in these critical stages of their careers.

The need to establish social networks for women within the data science world has become increasingly clear. Many of the issues women face in their struggle to reach parity stem from lack of mentors, sponsors, teachers, friends, and colleagues. Based on a UN initiative, the forthcoming Dartmouth Library Women in Data Science (WIDS) initiative hopes to address this need. Led by Catrina Cuadra, WIDS will create a space for women to advance their technical skills and learn some of the soft skills needed to engage in the tech world. While the skills are important, the professional and personal networks that arise from the group meetings are what will ultimately contribute to building a longer table in the world of data science and tech.

Please keep an eye out for the first WIDS meeting. All gender identities are welcome. If you have any questions about WIDS please contact Catrina Cuadra.