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Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

Change the Subject as a Teaching Tool by Jill Baron

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Change the Subject, a film about libraries, labels, and activism, was co-directed by Dartmouth librarian Jill Baron and filmmaker Sawyer Broadley and co-produced by Dartmouth alumni Melissa Padilla ‘16 and Óscar Rubén Cornejo Cásares ‘17. The film explores the singular effort of students and librarians to change the Library of Congress subject heading “Illegal aliens,” a movement that has had a national impact.

It premiered at Dartmouth College on April 27, 2019, and since then, has had 51 public screenings, been included in two film festivals, and was broadcast on Vermont PBS, part of their “Made Here” series. The impact of the film has been widespread, but perhaps most significantly as a teaching tool in a variety of classrooms. The film has been screened to K-12 audiences as an illustration of civics in action, and is increasingly included in library and information school curricula, prompting a new generation of librarians to ponder what diversity and inclusion in libraries really mean when these values are at odds with traditional library practices.

At Dartmouth, students in the Fall 2019 course “Latinx Lives in the United States” produced Words Matter, an online exhibit about the film, delving deeper into topics such as the role of language in determining identity, and the history of immigrant rights activism at Dartmouth. Given that the film explores how libraries use cataloging and controlled vocabularies to organize information, teaching librarians are finding the film useful in terms of building critical information literacy skills in students. Baron aims to produce a teaching toolkit for the film, and hopes that the film will continue to inspire conversations about social justice, racial equity, and inclusivity in libraries and higher education.

Dartmouth Library reports on “Teaching with Primary Sources” by Morgan Swan

During the 2019-2020 academic year, the Dartmouth Library is participating in a study conducted by Ithaka S+R, a not-for-profit service that helps academic communities serve the public good and navigate economic, technological, and demographic change. The current study, titled “Supporting Teaching with Primary Sources,” is being facilitated by Morgan Swan, Daniel Abosso, and Myranda Fuentes, and has benefitted from significant contributions from Joshua Dacey before his departure. The Dartmouth Library team will partner with Ithaka S+R and twenty-five other institutions of higher learning in both the US and the UK to conduct a series of interviews with faculty who use primary sources in the classroom in some capacity.

At present, twelve Dartmouth faculty have been interviewed and transcriptions will soon be generated. Then, the Dartmouth Library team will review and code the transcripts according to certain keywords of relevance and interest. Once that’s complete, the information will be collated and used in the creation of a report that will seek to elucidate the ways in which the Dartmouth Library can provide support for faculty who want to incorporate primary sources in meaningful ways in the classroom, whether on-site or virtually.

The information gathered here at Dartmouth will also be included in a capstone report by Ithaka S+R and will be essential for the larger library profession to further understand how the support needs of instructors in teaching with primary sources are evolving. The Dartmouth Library’s local report will go live in September 2020 and Ithaka’s larger report should appear soon after.

From Script to Print by Daniel Abosso

During fall term, Daniel Abosso taught an 8-week Osher class, “From Script to Print: European Cultural Change, 1300-1600” that focused on the how European intellectual culture changed during the transition from manuscripts to printed books. Students worked with manuscript and early printed books at Rauner Special Collections Library, prints at the Hood Museum, and parchment, paper, and the hand-press at the Book Arts Workshop to understand the physical processes involved in manuscript and book production. Each week was devoted to a different theme, from anatomy and disease to the discovery of the New World. Students read primary sources that ranged widely, from a 7th century encyclopedia to a 16th century Neo-Latin epic on syphilis. One student commented, “If ever you wanted to take a journey back in time to another place, this is the course! Daniel has the amazing ability to show the works of these ancient scholars in relation to world events and perspectives, and bring these personalities to life.”

Women in Data Science: Building a longer table starts at Dartmouth by Catrina Cuadra

While women struggle for equality across disciplines, women in data science face particular challenges. They struggle to reach representation and many find themselves unhappy working in these industries, ultimately leaving. There are several places where women veer off the path to a successful data science career, often in liminal stages where women lack support. These stages include transitioning from student to master, entering the professional world, and achieving professional success. Often women lack structures and networks to turn to in these critical stages of their careers.

The need to establish social networks for women within the data science world has become increasingly clear. Many of the issues women face in their struggle to reach parity stem from lack of mentors, sponsors, teachers, friends, and colleagues. Based on a UN initiative, the forthcoming Dartmouth Library Women in Data Science (WIDS) initiative hopes to address this need. Led by Catrina Cuadra, WIDS will create a space for women to advance their technical skills and learn some of the soft skills needed to engage in the tech world. While the skills are important, the professional and personal networks that arise from the group meetings are what will ultimately contribute to building a longer table in the world of data science and tech.

Please keep an eye out for the first WIDS meeting. All gender identities are welcome. If you have any questions about WIDS please contact Catrina Cuadra.

Photograph of William Cheng
Photograph of William Cheng

In this week's edition, we speak with William Cheng, Associate Professor of Music.  His most recent book Loving Music Till it Hurts is a capacious exploration of how people's head-over-heels attachments to music can variously align or conflict with agendas of social justice.

What is your book about?

How people's loving attachments to music can variously align or conflict with agendas of social justice.

Where did you get your idea(s) for this book?

This is the book I've always wanted to write ever since I began studying music. I've sought to understand why and how people judge music, and how these judgments soak and color our societal fabrics.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

It's difficult. As I research and write, I'm easily distracted by emails, pop-up windows, videos, and video games. The "oh crap!" awareness of a deadline is what usually pulls me back into a diligent headspace.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

The library of the future should strive for maximum accessibility. Beyond digitization and remote access, our books, articles, and musical scores should ideally be adapted/adaptable to accommodate all learners.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Be kind when appraising the writing of others.

And finally, what do you read for fun? 

If I had more time to read for fun these days (and I say this knowing I could always work harder to make more time for this), I would reread the full Dragon Ball (Z) manga by Akira Toriyama. Also, Eliot's Middlemarch--I've had it on my Kindle for years; about once a year, I ritualistically start the book, then get distracted by work stuff. Maybe 2020 will be the year.

Photograph of Philip J. Kinsler
Photograph of Philip J. Kinsler

In this week's edition, we speak with Philip J. Kinsler, a clinical associate professor from the psychiatry department. In his most recent book Complex Psychological Trauma : The Centrality of Relationship, he explores subjects such as Psychic trauma-- treatment, traumatic psychoses, and psychotherapy.

What is your book about?

It is about everything I learned doing psychotherapy for severe abuse survivors for more than 40 years. A broad theoretical view of the diagnostic process and a healing relationship form of treatment.

Where did you get your idea(s) for this book?

Performing therapy, teaching apprentice therapists and psychiatry residents, reading voraciously, attending conferences focusing on finding brilliant people to learn from regardless of what they said they were going to speak about.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

I could not have written this book, with no support staff to help, without the research tools from the American Psychological Association, particularly the PSYCinfo database and the PSYCarticles being on-line accessible.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

I fear everything may go online for cost savings, thus losing spaces to think in, serendipitous findings of interesting work, expert guidance about where research and clinical information ‘"lives."

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Find people you will love to learn from, apprentice to them, take it all in but eventually make it your own. Gather important experience before writing. Historians for example laugh at people who “read ten books then wrote one.” Do your homework in original sources.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

Ron Chernow’s biographies of Grant, Hamilton, Washington, are invaluable psychological studies of major figures in American History and of the development of “character,” so crucial to our times. Jane Sherron DeHart’s biography of Ruth Bader Ginsburg gives important information about the legal fight for women’s equality and the frustrating rise of the conservative right. To understand people, read history and biography as well as psychology and psychiatry. Real lives teach us a lot.

Txetxu Aguado

In this week's edition, we speak with Txetxu Aguado, Associate Professor of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.  He is the author of two recently published books: Sexualidades disidentes: un acercamiento fílmico desde la prostitución y la pornografía, Dykinson, 2019; and  Representaciones artísticas y sociales del envejecimiento, Dykinson, 2018. In his book, Representaciones Artísticas y Sociales del Envejecimiento, he represents the process of ageing in art, culture and society.

 

What is your book about?

It is about ageing.

Where did you get your idea(s) for this book?

In cooperation with other colleagues, we were trying to define new roles for old folks different from grandparenthood.

What does research look like for you? What element of research  could you not live without?

My research makes it easier to understand what is going on around us.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

An archive where access to old publications, records, visual materials would be easier.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Keep on going, do not let criticism take you away from your research and writing.

And finally, what do you read for fun? 

Tokarczuk, Olga. "Drive your Plow over the Bones of the Dead" Stojka, Ceija. "Une artiste rom dans le siecle" McEwan, Ian. "Machines like me".

Jennifer Miller

In this week's edition, we speak with Jennifer Miller, Assistant Professor in the Department of History.  In her most recent book, Cold war Democracy: The United States and Japan, Miller examines the evolution of ideas about democracy during the Cold War by charting the development of the alliance between the United States and Japan from the postwar occupation into the 1960s.

What is your book about?

My book examines the U.S.-Japanese relationship after World War II to consider how a concept that we associate with freedom and liberation—democracy—can simultaneously facilitate liberatory and anti-liberatory outcomes.

Where did you get your idea(s) for this book?

This book was produced over a very long period of time—it started as my masters thesis at the University of Wisconsin, where I earned a MA and PhD in the history of U.S. Foreign Relations. It’s therefore gone through many iterations. The original idea to write about postwar U.S.-Japanese relations came from reading John Dower’s Embracing Defeat about the U.S. occupation of Japan; I wanted to know what happened next and was dissatisfied with the existing literature. But as I did more research and reading, my question changed—I became interested in mid-century understandings of democracy, especially the widespread belief that democracy was a psychological system dependent on a specific “state of mind.” In doing my research in the United States, Japan, and Great Britain, I noticed how often policymakers—both American and Japanese—defined democracy in such terms and I became curious about the consequences; what policy outcomes did this enable and what did it prevent?

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

The core of my research involves reading large amounts of historical documents. For my book, I read thousands upon thousands of pages of government and non-government documents at various archives and pieced them together to formulate a larger historical narrative and argument. While historians used to take notes or make copies at the archives, now our research is more digital; we take photographs of the documents and time at the archives is often a mad dash to gather as much material as possible. I then convert the photographs to PDF’s, read them and take notes—this is the most generative portion of my research process and it’s where I get my main ideas and develop my arguments. I have a very set system for how I do my writing. I read through my notes and compose a massive outline (often over 100 pages) for each book chapter that includes every piece of evidence or quote that I plan to use. For my first draft, I write up the outline—I find a blank page very intimidating and knowing that I have the outline to work from is extremely helpful for me—and then I edit, edit, edit, and edit more. So I suppose a camera is perhaps the most useful tool, though my archival trips are also fueled by a prodigious amount of coffee and I rely heavily on my cats’ company while writing.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

I hope the library of the future doesn’t look that different from the library of the present! To me, an ideal library has lots of books, open and accessible stacks, excellent and helpful librarians, exciting educational and scholarly programming, and access to coffee. While digital resources can offer unprecedented access to new scholarship and historical materials and are thus important investments for all libraries, I always check out the physical book when I can. So books…lots of books!

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Develop your own system and stick to it. There is all sorts of advice out there about how to write and how to produce. What’s important, I think, is to identify your big writing obstacles and then find ways to make them surmountable. Read widely, and read outside your area of expertise, because sometimes that is where the best ideas come from. Remember that your reader is not inside your head, so your goal as a writer is the make your assumptions clear on the page. The hardest part of writing, for me, is remembering what is not obvious to my reader when I’ve been working on a topic for years.

And finally, what do you read for fun? 

In the past few years, I’ve recommitted myself to reading fiction in the service of my own mental health and creativity, and I try to get in some non-work reading every day. There are so many good books coming out – a few I’ve enjoyed recently are Min Jin Lee’s Pachinko, which is a marvelous and compelling multigenerational story; Lydia Kiesling’s The Golden State, which is so wonderful on the dynamics of academia and the mundane joys and difficulties of parenting; Kate Atkinson’s Transcription, which took an unexpected and surprising turn at the end; and Weike Wang’s Chemistry: A Novel, which has an amazing sense of pattern and voice. I also love mysteries and detective stories, so I have read all of Tana French’s work. My favorite book, however, is probably Jane Austen’s Persuasion, and I reread it almost every year. I don’t have a systematic way that I pick what I read; because I often take my children to Hanover’s Howe Library, I always make a point of perusing their excellent new books section and grab whatever looks interesting. Next on my list is finishing Eleanor Catton’s The Luminaries.

Derrick E. White, Visiting Associate Professor of History

In this week's edition, we speak with Derrick E. White, a visiting associate professor of African and African American Studies and History at Dartmouth College. White’s research focuses on modern black history and sports history. In his most recent book, Blood, Sweat, & Tears : Jake Gaither, Florida A&M, and the History of Black College Football he explores the legacy of black college football, taking as its central figure one of the most successful coaches in its history, Jake Gaither.

 

What is your book about?

History & African and African American Studies

Where did you get your ideas for this book?

My book is about the development and greatness of football programs at Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

My research consists primarily archival research and the examination of historical newspapers. I could not live without the digitization of black newspapers.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

The core of my research involves reading large amounts of historical documents. For my book, I read thousands upon thousands of pages of government and non-government documents at various archives and pieced them together to formulate a larger historical narrative and argument. While historians used to take notes or make copies at the archives, now our research is more digital; we take photographs of the documents and time at the archives is often a mad dash to gather as much material as possible. I then convert the photographs to PDF’s, read them and take notes—this is the most generative portion of my research process and it’s where I get my main ideas and develop my arguments. I have a very set system for how I do my writing. I read through my notes and compose a massive outline (often over 100 pages) for each book chapter that includes every piece of evidence or quote that I plan to use. For my first draft, I write up the outline—I find a blank page very intimidating and knowing that I have the outline to work from is extremely helpful for me—and then I edit, edit, edit, and edit more. So I suppose a camera is perhaps the most useful tool, though my archival trips are also fueled by a prodigious amount of coffee and I rely heavily on my cats’ company while writing.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Every writer must have a soundtrack.

And finally, what do you read for fun? 

I read mysteries for fun. Books by Harlan Coben, David Baldacci, and Barry Eisler provide a respite from my research areas in African American and sports history. These authors are masters at setting scenes, character development, and pace.

 

Cover of Loving Music Till it HurtsHappy new year, and welcome to the Winter 2020 term!  When passing through the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library, be sure to check out these new books by Dartmouth authors on display.  And please mark your calendars for our Winter 2020 book talk on Thursday, February 13, 2020, at 4:30 PM.  Just in time for Valentine's Day, the talk will feature William Cheng (Music), author of Loving Music Till It Hurts (Oxford University Press, 2020).

Jennifer M. Miller (History) Cold War Democracy: The United States and Japan. Harvard University Press, 2019. 

Joseph "Txetxu" Aguado (Spanish & Portuguese) Sexualidades disidentes: un acercamiento fílmico desde la prostitución y la pornografía, Dykinson, 2019; Representaciones artísticas y sociales del envejecimiento, Dykinson, 2018

Lucas Hollister (French & Italian) Beyond Return: Genre and Cultural Politics in Contemporary French Fiction. Liverpool University Press, 2019

James E. "Jed" Dobson (Institute for Writing and Rhetoric, English & Creative Writing) Critical Digital Humanities: The Search for a Methodology. University of Illinois Press, 2019

Derrick E. White (History) Blood, Sweat, and Tears: Jake Gaither, Florida A&M, and the History of Black College Football. University of North Carolina Press, 2019

Philip J. Kinsler (Geisel School of Medicine) Complex Psychological Trauma: The Centrality of Relationship, Routledge, 2018

Sunglim Kim (Art HIstory) Flowering Plums and Curio Cabinets: The Culture of Objects in Late Chosŏn Korean Art. University of Washington Press, 2018

Petra S. McGillen (German Studies) The Fontane Workshop: Manufacturing Realism in the Industrial Age of Print. Bloomsbury Academic, 2019

Zahra Ayubi (Religion) Gendered Morality: Classical Islamic Ethics of the Self, Family, and Society Columbia University Press, 2019

William Cheng (Music) Loving Music Till It Hurts Oxford University Press, 2020

 

 

cover of book MoonbitNot only has the King Arthur Café reopened for fall term, but fall term brings a new batch of books to the display of New Books by Dartmouth Authors.  Don’t miss it!  Take a look at the books on display, and reach out to the authors to let them know what you think of their book.  In addition, please mark your calendars for the Fall 2019 book talk, on November 7, 2019, at 4:30 PM, featuring Rena Mosteirin and Jed Dobson, authors of Moonbit.  Part poetry, part essay, Moonbit delves into the computer code that made space travel possible.

List of Fall 2019 books (and authors):

A Hetero-functional Graph Theory for Modeling Interdependent Smart City Infrastructure.  Wester C.H. Schoonenberg (Ph.D. Thayer), Inas S. Khayal (TDI), and Amro M. Farid (Thayer)

Not Working: Where Have All the Good Jobs Gone?  David G. Blanchflower (Economics)

Hammer and Anvil: Nomad Rulers at the Forge of the Modern World.  Pamela Crossley (History; Asian Societies, Cultures, and Languages)

Rediscovering U.S. Newsfilm: Cinema, Television, and the Archive.  Mark Williams (Film & Media Studies)

Moonbit. Rena Mosteirin (MALS) and Jed Dobson (Institute for Writing and Rhetoric, MALS) -- also available open access

War and Chance: Assessing Uncertainty in International Politics.  Jeffrey Friedman (Government)

Quatro cavaleiros no Brasil.  Camila Feltrin ’20, Jordan McGriff ’20, Libby Decker ’20, Shawn Kim ’20, Carlos Minchillo; Jarely López ’19  (Spanish & Portuguese)

Postcolonial Hauntologies: African Women’s Discourses of the Female Body.  Ayo Coly (Comparative Literature; African and African-American Studies)

Divine currency: The Theological Power of Money in the West.  Devin Singh (Religion)

Devotions and Desires: Histories of Sexuality and Religion in Twentieth-Century United States.  Bethany Moreton (History)

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

In this issue, we bring you three articles from across the Dartmouth libraries. First, Julia Logan shares her reflection on the 2019 Librarians Active Learning Institutes (LALI). Next, for those who could not attend the Summer Celebration on July 27, Joshua Dacey describes how library faculty created active learning experiences throughout the day long event. Finally, we end this volume of the Library Teaching Quarterly with an article about the upcoming "Adventuresome Spirit" exhibit, which is the fourth and final installation in the Library's 250th exhibition series. Please enjoy!

Librarians Active Learning Institute Expands to Meet Demand

by Julia Logan

Summer 2019 marked the 8th year of the Librarians Active Learning Institute (LALI) and the 4th year of the Archives and Special Collections track. LALI, which is a re-envisioning of Dartmouth’s Active Learning Institute (ALI) for faculty, offers librarians and archivists of all teaching levels the opportunity to reflect upon their teaching, collaborate with peers, and develop and refine learner-centered teaching skills. Participants take part in multi-day sessions focused on LALI’s core principles of Meet, Engage and Reflect. By the end of the programs, they employ these principles by designing and facilitating active learning experiences.

Historically, LALI and LALI-ASC are offered once per summer, consisting of 16 and 12 person cohorts, respectively.  However, due to such a high number of applicants over the past few years and the increasing demand for instructors to facilitate active learning programming separate from the summer institutes, LALI and LALI-ASC were expanded to offer an additional session of both.

Instructors from Teaching and Learning, Archives and Special Collections and the Dartmouth Center for the Advancement of Learning worked with a total of 56 participants representing community colleges, state universities, small liberal-arts colleges and even the oldest, military college in the United States. As in past years we also welcomed new Library staff members with teaching responsibilities.

Double the number of sessions hopefully means double the number of librarians and archivists who are better equipped to meet their community of learners where they are, actively engage them in the process of teaching and learning and encourage reflection and articulation of learning.

Beyond the Library: Active Learning in the Wild

by Joshua Dacey

Have you ever found yourself staring longingly through the glass of an exhibit case at a mesmerizing artifact just out of reach?  Inextricably, your hands rise up to touch the glass. You know you should not and in fact, all the signs posted around the museum tell you not to, but maybe, just maybe, if you can touch the relic for a moment, you can be a part of history. I have seen this moment play out hundreds of times in my career as a museum educator. I learned a long time ago to capitalize on those moments of inquiry to fuel active learning. Recently, I had the opportunity to facilitate a day full of such moments at the Dartmouth 250th Anniversary Summer Celebration on July 27.

Throughout the day, staff highlighted the library’s collections at several active learning “stations.” As the day was warm and Baker Berry Library features not only water fountains but air conditioning (who needs books), a strategically placed final activity station on the Library lawn drew a small crowd. Visitors of all age took turns creating colorful pennants representing their home communities. At first glance, the activity appeared to be a simple offering of arts and crafts. A closer look revealed active learning in practice. As visitors created their unique community banner, they shared memories of home with each other. Patrons shared their hometown experiences while creating an artifact very similar an artifact housed a few yards away in the “Generations of Community” exhibit, a Dartmouth College football pennant.

While viewers cannot touch the artifacts, it was my hope that during the activity, visitors could make a personal connection to the exhibit’s theme of communities and symbols of community at Dartmouth.

"Adventuresome Spirit"

by Joshua Dacey

With two and a half centuries of history, Dartmouth has its fair share of legends and lore. For instance, there is John Ledyard, the great adventurer who in 1773 chopped down a tree, carved a canoe, paddled down the Connecticut River, and eventually sailed around the globe with Captain Cook. Sounds like a great adventure, right? Now, under a closer lens.

Ledyard essentially dropped out of classes, destroyed school property, and captained an illegal sailing vessel down the river. Did I mention he died a pauper in Egypt and was buried in an unmarked grave?  So why is John Ledyard remembered so fondly? Why is there an outdoor organization named after him (Ledyard Canoe Club)? Ledyard’s legend stands tall at Dartmouth because it is a tale of exploration, daring, and bravery.  Some might say Ledyard was an adventuresome spirit. Yet, as we all know, adventure can take many forms. The multiple interpretations of “what is an adventuresome spirit” was given careful consideration by the curators for the final Dartmouth 250th Anniversary exhibition.

Co-curated by Amy Witzel and Joshua Dacey, “Adventuresome Spirit” illuminates the “individuals and groups who have helped to shape the adventuresome spirit at Dartmouth– through innovation, service, teaching, athleticism, exploration, and leadership.” Taking a nuanced approach to curation, the exhibit is both visually compelling and driven by a narrative. Four panels were designed as kaleidoscopic representations of adventure through images with only a single central quote for text. The other two panels take a more traditional approach of a narrative driven artifact based exhibit. The juxtaposition of design style allows for visitors of differing learning style to engage with the exhibit content through multiple lenses.

“Adventuresome Spirit” was curated by Amy Witzel and Joshua Dacey. Exhibit design provided by Dennis Grady. Editing by Laura Barrett, Joshua Dacey, and Jay Satterfield. The exhibit will be installed from October 2nd until Decemberr 18th, 2019 in Reiss Hall located in Baker Library. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

Ghost Trees and Reliquary are both an artistic collaboration between poet and Louisiana native Martha Serpas and printmaker Michelle Burgess at Brighton Press. Both books are part of Michele Burgess’s ongoing collaborative series; “The Stratigraphic Archives.” Burgess describes this series as an exploration of the processes, forms, and markings that reflect the patterns, gestures, and atmospheres of both quiet and cataclysmic events. She is interested in the relationship of these events to the human condition and the conditions of nature at its most fragile. She explores the concepts of palimpsest, time and gesture, erasure and repair. Working in collaboration with other artists and poets, she seeks to combine human history and natural history, bringing these themes together in an essential way, working with ideas inspired by places such as churches and reliquaries, geological sites, art museums, personal memory, natural history museums, riverbeds and ocean floors, and library rare book rooms. Martha Serpas’ view of the books is that both translate the feeling of the elements at work. 

“I am imagining one of these books, its pages flipping as if wind-tossed, as an experience of the wind as passionate with a double effect—cleansing and destructive.” [https://www.brightonpress.net/our-collaborators ]

The first volume of the series, Repair [Presses B766bur] is available in Rauner Special Collection as is the fourth, A Torn Web: 16 Poems [Presses B766stto]

Reliquary [Art Special Collection, PS3619.E77 R46 2016] is the first collaboration between Michele Burgess and Martha Serpas and is volume nine in the Stratigraphic Archive. The poems are focused on Louisiana where her hometown of Galliano is disappearing into the Gulf of Mexico due to coastal erosion and rising seawaters. Burgess's etchings are concerned with the disappearance of the languages and patterns of nature.    The etchings are "ghost" printings on Twinrocker paper collaged with torn fragments from the first impression of the print on Gampi paper making each edition unique. Each volume is bound in cloth and leather by Claudia Cohen and housed in a clamshell box made by Sonja Jones. The poem was handset in Perpetua and printed letterpress by Nelle Martin.

Ghost trees [Art Special Collection N7433.4.B865 G5 2017] is the second collaboration between Michelle Burgess and Martha Serpa and is volume ten of the Stratigraphic Archive This volume also combines the poetry of Martha Serpas with 23 drypoints and 2 etchings by Michele Burgess.  The poem first appeared in The Dirty Side of the Storm and was reprinted with permission for this edition. The drypoints were printed by hand from copper plates and were hand colored on Echizen Shikibu Gampi paper by the artist. This edition includes one of the copper plates, bound into the clamshell box by Mark Tomlinson. The text was handset in Perpetua and printed letterpress by Nelle Martin.

These books will be on display in the Sherman Art Library August 13 - December 2, 2019