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Please join us for:
Territory (Territorio) an exhibition by Ragko (Julio Muñoz) in Berry 183

Open-Air Painting
Tues 5/22: 2-6pm Baker Main Hall
Gallery Talk + Reception
Fri 5/25: 6-8pm Berry 183

For Ragko, the language of art expresses the most profound connections of being in a territory. He creates new visual expressions to evoke historical memory and project emergent identity formation, with the ultimate goal of contributing to the recuperation of the Mapuche Pueblo. “Territory” explores these new identity formations within rapidly shifting climates. His exhibition at Dartmouth projects landscapes from perspectives of tangible spaces – like flora and fauna endemic to Mapuche-Williche territory – towards the intangible, with a cultural presence beyond the recognizable.

Ragko (Julio Muñoz) holds degrees in Architecture from the Pontificia Universidad Católica in Santiago, and in Fine Arts from the Universidad de Chile. Ragko has practiced visual arts through a variety of expressions: drawing, wood sculpting, metallurgy, oil painting, graphic design, and video and photography. Parallel to his artistic work, he works professionally in both industrial and graphic design. He teaches art to children and youth in communities that are socioculturally marginalized in Chilean society to help shape their artistic expression. He assumes the conditional identity that influences all his art, namely his belonging, since childhood, to the alto txen txen, a site of cultural signification for Mapuche-Williche people in the sector of Rawe, Osorno. His cosmovision manifests from this belonging – this being – rooted in the physical and temporal dimensions, as well as the traditions and dreamscapes of this territory.

The name Ragko derives from the mixture of water and clay. Rawe, the place where he was born and lives, roughly translates to the place of clay.

Ragko articulates his work in collections. This form produces expressive, methodological, and aesthetic possibilities linked to the life processes and ancestral identity of being Mapuche-Williche. This ‘doing-with’ corresponds with the rhythms of life itself and finds expression within the visual display of his work as a collection. His work navigates diverse conceptual and physical territories, and resides in harbors that connect to other places of internal or external importance, old or new. Within this residence, his art consolidates the definitive patterns.

This visit is sponsored by the Leslie Center for the Humanities, Native American Studies, Latin American, Latino, & Caribbean Studies, Dept. of Studio Art, Dept. of Geography, and classroom visits made possible by the Rockefeller Center Classroom.

Haitian Graffiti Artist Jerry Rosembert Moïse will give a live demonstration of his work Friday January 12 from 10 am to 3pm in the Main Hall of the Baker Library  (Refreshments will be served from 1-3pm)

Jerry Rosembert Moïse is Haiti’s most prominent graffiti artist. His murals color Haiti’s urban landscape with images of everyday people grappling with the harsh realities of life in the impoverished country. But if his subject matter is misery, his subjects are not miserable. He showcases urban Haitians combating and cunningly navigating the most difficult challenges—disaster, insecurity, illiteracy, aid dependency, corruption, poverty—with courage, poise, and humor. At the same time his murals critique Haitian society, they also valorize the Haitian spirit, featuring strong, smart, and witty characters that invoke viewers’ sympathies and respect simultaneously. Situated at the intersection of Haitian traditions of popular art, Caribbean models of humor and caricature, and graffiti practices common in the urban African diaspora, Jerry’s murals present a new movement of public art as a form of social critique in Haiti.

Jerry Rosembert Moïse's visit and painting demonstration are sponsored by Dartmouth's Department of Anthropology.

Julianne Swartz's art exhibit in Sherman Art Library

Part of the Hood Museum's exhibit Resonant Spaces: Sound Art at Dartmouth in the Sherman Art Library Reference Room

9/15/17–12/10/17

Building on the qualities and expectations of the library, Swartz created three listening objects that resemble books in scale, weight, and location. They are meant to be held and listened to by one person at a time, and this one-on-one relationship dictates the objects’ form and function. The sound is a private, singular experience that echoes the act of reading.  Please pick up the objects (one at a time) and listen to them.

One of Julianne Swartz's objects with audio

Each object transmits a short piece of specific text. Swartz transcribed each text and spoke it aloud at the rate of transcription, trying to release the words vocally only as she wrote them. So the pen rushed to catch up with her voice and her voice slowed to stay in time with the pen in order to “absorb" the texts more slowly. She recorded both the sound of her voice and the writing simultaneously on different tracks so she could mix them together in varied combinations.

Swartz chose texts that spoke of the poetic transmission from writer to reader, and of receptivity—that is, the receptivity of listening as akin to the receptive state of reading.

The three texts Swartz used, one for each object, are Deep Listening: A Composer’s Sound Practice, by Pauline Oliveros (Deep Listening Publications, 2005); Collected Prose, by Charles Olson (University of California Press, 1997); and The Poetics of Space, by Gaston Bachelard (Presses Universitaires de France, 1958).

Transfer (objects) asks us to consider the act of reading through the act of listening. It suggests the echo of language in our mind as we read to ourselves, and it reminds us of the other sounds that accompany what we often think of as a silent act. As such, it questions how we receive information and develop knowledge and wisdom in an increasingly complex and noisy world.

Students in Sherman Art Library

This exhibit is part of the larger Hood Museum exhibit. Small installations can be seen throughout the Dartmouth Campus:

Hood Downtown:  Terry Adkins and Jess Rowland
Cummings Hall: Laura Mae
Sherman Art Library: Julianne Swartz
Class of 1978 Life Sciences Center: Bill Fontana
Sherman Fairchild Physical Sciences Center: Jacob Kirkegaard
Bema Amphitheater: Alvin Lucier
Strauss Gallery at the Hopkins Center for the Arts:  Christine Sun Kim

This exhibition was organized by the Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth, and generously supported by the George O. Southwick 1957 Memorial Fund, the Eleanor Smith Fund, the Department of Biological Sciences, the Thayer School of Engineering, and the Danish Arts Foundation.

8

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds, Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall, January 6-March 31, 2017. Exhibit reception: Wednesday, January 25, 3-4:30pmA new exhibit in the Baker-Berry Library at Dartmouth, Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds, provides a window onto the unique culture and environment of the ‘Roof of the World.’ This exhibit explores the social and religious practices that shape life in Asia’s high mountain environments, explores the political history of the region, and describes some of the encounters between foreigners and Himalayan and Tibetan people over time. The exhibit has been curated by Senior Lecturer Kenneth Bauer and Associate Professor Sienna Craig, who have lived and worked in the region for decades.

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds is enriched by the presence on campus of artist Tenzin Norbu. Born in 1970 in the Himalayan region of Dolpo, Nepal, Norbu studied traditional thangka painting as well as Buddhism from his father, following a lineage of painters that dates back more than 400 years. He is now one of the leading figures in contemporary Tibetan art.  In addition to being a painter and lama (religious and community leader), Norbu is a social entrepreneur, encouraging education and sustainable development in one of Nepal’s most remote districts.

Photo credit: Jens Kirkeby
Photo credit: Jens Kirkeby

Norbu’s repertoire ranges from traditional imagery to unique depictions of daily life, religious practice, and landscape. His work was highlighted in the 1998 film Himalaya (Caravan), the only Nepali film to have been nominated for an Academy Award. Over the past fifteen years, Norbu’s work has been featured in exhibitions in global cities, from Kathmandu and New York City, to Aarhus, Monaco, Lucerne, Paris, Osaka, Tokyo, and Thimphu, Bhutan.

Norbu was one of the artists in Tradition Transformed: Tibetan Artists Respond, an exhibit which originated at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City, and traveled to the HOOD Museum in 2010. Norbu is the illustrator of five children’s books, including Clear Sky, Red Earth: A Himalayan Story, a project on which he collaborated with Professor Sienna Craig (Anthropology) and which has been published in both English and Tibetan.

On January 19 and 25, 2017, Norbu will spend time (9:30am – 2:30pm) painting in the Baker-Berry corridor. A reception for the artist and to celebrate the exhibit will take place on January 25, from 3-4:30pm. Norbu will also be visiting classes and staging a popup exhibit of some of his recent work at the Black Family Arts Center, beginning January 17.

Richard Miller, our library colleague from Baker-Berry Access Services, is the curator of the exhibition A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America, currently on view at the American Folk Art Museum in New York City through March 8, 2015.  The show will travel nationwide over the next two years.

A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America offers a stunning presentation of American folk art made primarily in rural areas of New England, the Midwest, and the South between 1800 and 1920. More than sixty works of art, including still-life, landscape, allegorical, and portrait paintings, commercial and highly personal sculpture, and distinctive examples of art from the German-American community exemplify the breadth of American creative expression by individuals who did not always adhere to the academic models that established artistic taste in urban centers of the East Coast.”

Game Board image
GAME BOARD, Artist unidentified, American Folk Art Museum, New York City

You can read more about his exhibit in this New York Times article.

Richard has also written for the Rauner blog:  The Dartmouth Medal and A Story of Crime, Punishment and Redemption Torn from the Headlines!

His contributed essays and catalog entries include:

  • Expressions of Eloquence and Innocence: Selections from the Jane Katcher Collection of Americana Vols. I & II (Yale, 2006 and 2011)
  • Encyclopedia of New England (Yale, 2005)
  • Encyclopedia of American Folk Art (Routledge, 2004)
  • American Naïve Paintings (National Gallery of Art, 1992)

Richard has three articles forthcoming on American art and decorative arts topics. We’ll be sure to let you know when those are published.

1

Between 1927 and 1931, the publishing firm Faber and Gwyer issued a series of illustrated poems called the Ariel Poems, named after Shakespeare’s sprite. Several prominent English writers contributed to the series including T.S. Eliot, W. B. Yeats, Thomas Hardy, G. K. Chesterton, D. H. Lawrence, Siegfried Sassoon, Vita Sackville-West, and Edith Sitwell. Each pamphlet had more or less the same simple format: a black and white artist print on the cover and a colored print inside followed by a poem.

What is most striking about these deceptively simple pamphlets is the role the illustrations play to complement and vastly enrich the poetry. Edward McKnight Kauffer, one of England’s most prolific and influential advertising poster artists during the 1920s and 30s, illustrated five of the poems T.S. Eliot wrote for the Ariel series. These poems were “The Journey of the Magi” (1927), “A Song for Simeon” (1928), “Marina” (1930), “Triumphal March” (1931), and later when the series was revived in the 1950s, “The Cultivation of Christmas Trees” (1954).

Kauffer was renowned for his avant-garde graphic design and poster art for companies such as London Underground Railways (1915–40), Shell UK Ltd., the Daily Herald and British Petroleum (1934–6). His work incorporated techniques and aesthetics from numerous modernist movements including cubism, futurism, and surrealism. These influences are evident in his illustrations for T.S. Eliot’s Ariel Poems with their whimsical play with geometric form and abstraction.
To see Kauffer’s illustrations of T.S. Eliot’s poems, ask for Val 817 E42 X3, Val 817 E42 W7, Val 817 E42 S2, Val 817 E42 P451, and Rare Book PS 3509.L43 M3 1930.

Between 1927 and 1931, the publishing firm Faber and Gwyer issued a series of illustrated poems called the Ariel Poems, named after Shakespeare’s sprite. Several prominent English writers contributed to the series including T.S. Eliot, W. B. Yeats, Thomas Hardy, G. K. Chesterton, D. H. Lawrence, Siegfried Sassoon, Vita Sackville-West, and Edith Sitwell. Each pamphlet had more or less the same simple format: a black and white artist print on the cover and a colored print inside followed by a poem.

What is most striking about these deceptively simple pamphlets is the role the illustrations play to complement and vastly enrich the poetry. Edward McKnight Kauffer, one of England’s most prolific and influential advertising poster artists during the 1920s and 30s, illustrated five of the poems T.S. Eliot wrote for the Ariel series. These poems were “The Journey of the Magi” (1927), “A Song for Simeon” (1928), “Marina” (1930), “Triumphal March” (1931), and later when the series was revived in the 1950s, “The Cultivation of Christmas Trees” (1954).

Kauffer was renowned for his avant-garde graphic design and poster art for companies such as London Underground Railways (1915–40), Shell UK Ltd., the Daily Herald and British Petroleum (1934–6). His work incorporated techniques and aesthetics from numerous modernist movements including cubism, futurism, and surrealism. These influences are evident in his illustrations for T.S. Eliot’s Ariel Poems with their whimsical play with geometric form and abstraction.

To see Kauffer’s illustrations of T.S. Eliot’s poems, ask for Val 817 E42 X3, Val 817 E42 W7, Val 817 E42 S2, Val 817 E42 P451, and Rare Book PS 3509.L43 M3 1930.