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Books by Dartmouth Authors for the Summer display in KAFWhat are you reading this summer?  Need a suggestion? How about a portrait of Vietnam War soldiers, an exploration of fly-fishing and physics, or an account of labor conditions of low-wage workers worldwide?  A study of a 50-year research project in a New Hampshire forest, a history of the Hebrew language, or a guide to help conquer your migraines, once and for all?  The Summer 2018 display of New Books by Dartmouth Authors is now up in the King Arthur Flour Café, showcasing a fascinating array of research and scholarship from members of the Dartmouth community.

Want more?  Check out “Holding Court,” a series of short interviews with the authors, appearing Mondays throughout the term.  And I hope you can come to this summer’s book talk, on July 18 at 4:30 PM in the East Reading Room of Baker-Berry, with Marcelo Gleiser, professor of physics and astronomy at Dartmouth.  Author of The Simple Beauty of the Unexpected: A Natural Philosopher's Quest for Trout and the Meaning of Everything, Gleiser’s lyrical prose explores the physics – and bigger philosophical questions – pertaining to fly-fishing, a hobby he picked up after watching a class on the Dartmouth Green.

Next time you’re in line at the KAF (which, by the way, reopens on June 21), take a look at this summer’s selection.  The Dartmouth Library has a copy of each one of these books for check-out, or, look for them in a library or bookstore near you:

 

Professor Katie HornsteinHolding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

In this week's edition, we talk with Katie Hornstein, a specialist of nineteenth-century French art and visual culture.  Her book, Picturing War in France, 1792–1856 (Yale University Press, 2018), examines representations of contemporary conflict in the first half of the 19th century and how these pictures provided citizens with an imaginative stake in wars being waged in their name.  Katie also recently co-edited Horace Vernet and the Thresholds of Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture (University Press of New England, 2017) about the artist Horace Vernet, who, although popular during his lifetime, was reviled by the poet Charles Baudelaire and thus consigned to relative obscurity.  In this interview, Katie speaks about her single-authored monograph, Picturing War.

What is your book about?

My book deals with the emergence of a public in France after the French Revolution that was eager to consume pictures of war: these pictures were (relatively) easy to understand and often fun to look at, though they were also violent. I want to know what this tells us about the political and artistic culture of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. 

Where do you get your ideas?

From my cat. And from primary sources, especially works of art.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

For research, I could not live without Gallica (the digital portal of the Bibliothèque nationale de France), museums, curators, and my colleagues.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

I hope that it will still contain a lot of books. The digital world is wonderful, but I think it's important to know how to browse the shelves and be surprised by what you find.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Put down your phone and make space for non-distracted thinking.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

I just read Goodbye Vitamin by Rachel Khong and some salacious French revolutionary historical fiction by Hilary Mantel (A Place of Greater Safety); at the moment, I'm contending with a pile of old New Yorker magazines that have gone neglected in recent months.

cover of bookHolding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

In this week's edition, we talk with four of the student authors of Bartolomeo Platina: Lives of the Popes, Paul II (Faenum Publishing, 2017).  During the Spring 2016 term, Professor Thomas Hendrickson created an experiential learning opportunity by assigning Latin 28 students the task of producing an edition of a Renaissance Latin text. The manuscript was completed during the ten-week term, and was published last fall.  The edition has 11 co-authors, including current students and alumni/ae, proving that Dartmouth undergraduates are no strangers to high quality research and scholarship.  The Classics department is sponsoring a launch party for the book on Friday, April 13 from 4:30-6 PM in Bartlett 201.  Students, alumni, faculty and friends are welcome to attend.

What is your book about?

Graham Rigby (GR): The text concerns Pope Paul II's imprisonment and torture of humanists during the early part of the renaissance in Rome.  Daniel Gridley (DG): The winners write the history books, so Bartolomeo Platina took the liberty of writing the book on his arch nemesis, Pope Paul II.  Gaby Sommer (GS): We put together the first student edition of Platina’s Paul II, including grammatical, lexical, philological and historical commentary.

Where do you get your ideas?

GS: I've always been interested in finding ways to get young people excited about Latin -- to make it fun. Professor Hendrickson pitched this project as an opportunity to do just that. Learning Latin in high school, particularly with the AP curriculum, it was easy to get bogged down in grammar and "Gaul is divided into three parts" and forget the significance of the literature you’re reading. Sometimes you need a breath of fresh air. Lives of the Popes is a ready-made soap opera. It’s the Renaissance Game of Thrones. Our job was just to make it accessible.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

Kent Ueno (KU): I have the image of papers strewn everywhere. After all, research is a collaborative process and one needs to constantly be in conversation with the community. I wouldn't be able to live without different colored pens.  DG: Collaboration--the ability to bounce ideas and drafts off of colleagues.  GR: Research is being curled up with a book. Cozy chairs are a necessity.  GS: KAF!

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

GS: I hope we never outgrow traditional libraries, but I expect more Kindle-types, more digitization – maybe a library cloud?  KU: I think it's rather sadly becoming more digital. I like physical books though, and hope it can stay that way. I imagine it will be largely digital with sections off in the corner for the oldies who like books.  GR: Hopefully much the same as the library of today.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

KU: Find something you're actually interested in. You'll put out your best work when you really care.  DG: Write! The more you write, the more you write. Like anything, it takes practice to find your own voice.  GS: I’m still in college, so I'm speaking from limited experience, but I think a combination of good mentorship, patience, and choosing work you genuinely enjoy at the end of the day goes a long way.  GR: Don't worry about deadlines.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

DG: I'm currently reading Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch, and next on my docket is Italo Calvino's The Nonexistent Knight.  KU: I'll read anything from the Lord of the Rings to the Hannibal Lecter series. I'd like to get more into books by authors like Brian Greene who explain complex physics ideas so clearly to general audiences. It's an extremely difficult skill I want to master.  GS: I read a lot of fiction – I really love John Irving, and he’s written so much that you can read him for a while. I’m also a big fan of essays when I’m short on time – Charles D’Ambrosio, Amy Schumer, Joan Didion and David Foster Wallace are my go-tos.  GR: These days I read a lot of ancient history - I'm currently (slowly) reading a book about the collapse of Eastern Mediterranean societies at the end of the late bronze age. If I had more time, I'd be reading Duff McKagan's It's So Easy: and Other Lies, a harrowing tale of his time as a member of Guns N' Roses and his long battle with drug and alcohol addiction.

Photo of Rashauna Johnson, professor of history and AAASHolding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

In this week's edition, we talk with Rashauna Johnson, Associate Professor of History, and author of Slavery's Metropolis: Unfree Labor in New Orleans during the Age of Revolutions (Cambridge University Press, 2016; paperback 2018). Rashauna's book has received much acclaim, garnering the 2016 Williams Prize for the best book in Louisiana history and an honorable mention for the Urban History Association's Kenneth Jackson Award.  Slavery's Metropolis was also a finalist for the 2016 Berkshire Conference of Women's Historians Book Prize, and the 2017 Frederick Douglass Book Prize.

What is your book about?

It shows how fights over the physical place of enslaved people in New Orleans were proxies for Atlantic debates about urbanity, mobility and modernity.

Where do you get your ideas?

Archival research, other scholars, and popular culture.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

Good music and great coffee.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

Beats me. I just hope it exists!

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

To pay attention to the craft of writing, and to remember that inspiration and discipline feed one another.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

Fiction. I love novels.  I haven’t started it, but next up is Brit Bennett’s The Mothers.

Photo of Sara Muñoz
Sara Muñoz-Muriana, Department of Spanish & Portuguese

Holding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library. 

In this week's edition, we talk with Sara Muñoz-Muriana, Assistant Professor of Spanish, and author of "Andando se hace el camino" : calle y subjetividades marginales en la España del siglo XIX.  Madrid: Iberoamericana, 2017.  Sara specializes in 19th century literature from Spain, and teaches classes teaches classes on the literature and culture of Spain from the 18th and 19th centuries.

What is your book about?

My book studies the street in connection with a number of marginal figures --prostitutes, beggars, female shoppers, ragpickers, the unemployed or adulterers--that populate the Spanish literary productions of the 19th century.

Where do you get your ideas?

Everywhere! Reading the newspaper, watching TV, or listening to the Spanish news, I couldn't help but establish connections between the great political and economic unrest in Spain today and the 19th-century characters in my literary works. And I have to say, my ideas take shape and become organized when I am outside running, an activity that I've been doing regularly and that has kept me sane!

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

For me, research doesn't always happen when we are busy in front of the computer. That's why I try to get away from the computer as much as possible, and sit down and read novels as people would have read them in the 19th century. Trying to recreate the reading and living experience of the time when these works were published is an essential part of my research.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

Honestly, I hope the library of the future looks very much like the library of today: a nice combination of physical materials and electronic resources. Baker-Berry does an awesome job in giving us access to online materials as well as materials from other libraries that are not here. As much as I like physical books, it would be great if in the future we could have immediate access to books that are not in Baker. The dream of any scholar would be to access any material with the touch of a button --in other words, if everything would be digitalized!

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Do something you are really interested in!

And finally, what do you read for fun?

I have recently discovered Scandinavian crime fiction, and precisely because it is so different to what I do as a scholar, it is something that I like to read to relax and have fun!

books by Dartmouth authors for the spring 2018 displaySpring is here!  And with it a new line-up of books by Dartmouth authors in the King Arthur Flour Café.  Next time you are in Baker-Berry, check out the newly redesigned display, which offers a powerful visual “read” on Dartmouth’s intellectual talent.  Its location in the King Arthur Flour Café is no accident; the Library serves as an incubator for much of the research and writing activities of Dartmouth authors, providing necessary services, staff expertise, and spaces for work.

The Spring 2018 cohort of ten authors includes both faculty and students, in the humanities and social sciences, and includes single-authored monographs, edited volumes, a translation, and an edition of Renaissance Latin text.  One new feature of the display is a series of interviews with the authors, editors, and translators, to be published throughout the term right here on Library Muse.  The Library will also be hosting a book talk each term featuring one of the books on display.  On Thursday, April 26 at 4:30 PM, in the East Reading Room, we will have Matt Garcia, co-editor of Food Across Borders (Rutgers, 2017) in dialogue with co-editor E. Melanie Dupuis and contributor Teresa Mares.

These books are now part of the Library's collections and are available for check out.  For more information, click on any of the links (below) or check out this guide to new books by Dartmouth authors:

While Dartmouth has had its share of real murders, this particular Dartmouth Murders, is the title of a work of fiction, possibly the first work of murder mystery fiction to feature the College, at least in book form. The story was perpetrated by Clifford Orr, Class of 1922, who would have lived through a real murder at the College in his sophomore year, but that’s a different story!

Clifford’s fictional murder is nothing like the real one. Instead it starts with the main character, Kenneth Harris, finding the body of his roommate hanging by his neck from the fire escape (in those days the fire escape was a rope that student would have to shimmy down in the event of a blaze). What appears at first to be a suicide quickly turns more sinister.

Orr first published the piece in serial form in College Humor under the title "The Dartmouth Mystery," though there is little if any humor in his piece. The story was then picked up by Farrar and Rinehart in the company’s inaugural year (1929) and made into a book. While Orr went on to publish another mystery with them, The Wailing Rock Murders, his final book, allegedly set on the Cornell campus, never made it into print. The Dartmouth Murders was made into a movie in 1935, titled A Shot in the Dark. The New York Times panned the movie version for which Orr wrote the script.

The Dartmouth Murders is full of familiar Dartmouth locations and references. For instance Kenneth Harris is a resident of North Mass, just as Clifford Orr was as a student. But when the clock strikes the hour it is not the Baker Tower clock as it would be today, but the Dartmouth Hall clock (Baker hadn’t been built when Orr was a student). Webster Hall, the Chapel and the Inn also get at least passing mention. Hanover establishments of yore also make appearances, The Dartmouth National Bank and Campion’s for instance, but ultimately the book is more about the mystery and Dartmouth is very much a backdrop.

In addition to several copies of the book, some signed by the author, we also have the original manuscript as well as Orr’s own letters home to his mother during his years at Dartmouth.

Orr, who started out as a literary associate at Doubleday, Dorn & Co., and later became a literary editor at The New Yorker, also published some short literary pieces in The New Yorker and wrote song lyrics. He died in Hanover in 1951 after “a long illness” at the age of 51.

To read The Dartmouth Murders, ask for: DC History, PZ3.O749 Dar or Rauner Alumni O75d
To see the College Humor version of the story ask for: DC History PZ3 .O749da
To see Orr’s papers and the manuscript version of the novel, ask for: MS-532
To watch A Shot in the Dark, go to Jones Media Center and ask for: Jones Media DVD 8519

While Dartmouth has had its share of real murders, this particular Dartmouth Murders, is the title of a work of fiction, possibly the first work of murder mystery fiction to feature the College, at least in book form. The story was perpetrated by Clifford Orr, Class of 1922, who would have lived through a real murder at the College in his sophomore year, but that’s a different story!

Clifford’s fictional murder is nothing like the real one. Instead it starts with the main character, Kenneth Harris, finding the body of his roommate hanging by his neck from the fire escape (in those days the fire escape was a rope that student would have to shimmy down in the event of a blaze). What appears at first to be a suicide quickly turns more sinister.

Orr first published the piece in serial form in College Humor under the title "The Dartmouth Mystery," though there is little if any humor in his piece. The story was then picked up by Farrar and Rinehart in the company’s inaugural year (1929) and made into a book. While Orr went on to publish another mystery with them, The Wailing Rock Murders, his final book, allegedly set on the Cornell campus, never made it into print. The Dartmouth Murders was made into a movie in 1935, titled A Shot in the Dark. The New York Times panned the movie version for which Orr wrote the script.

The Dartmouth Murders is full of familiar Dartmouth locations and references. For instance Kenneth Harris is a resident of North Mass, just as Clifford Orr was as a student. But when the clock strikes the hour it is not the Baker Tower clock as it would be today, but the Dartmouth Hall clock (Baker hadn’t been built when Orr was a student). Webster Hall, the Chapel and the Inn also get at least passing mention. Hanover establishments of yore also make appearances, The Dartmouth National Bank and Campion’s for instance, but ultimately the book is more about the mystery and Dartmouth is very much a backdrop.

In addition to several copies of the book, some signed by the author, we also have the original manuscript as well as Orr’s own letters home to his mother during his years at Dartmouth.

Orr, who started out as a literary associate at Doubleday, Dorn & Co., and later became a literary editor at The New Yorker, also published some short literary pieces in The New Yorker and wrote song lyrics. He died in Hanover in 1951 after “a long illness” at the age of 51.

To read The Dartmouth Murders, ask for: DC History, PZ3.O749 Dar or Rauner Alumni O75d
To see the College Humor version of the story ask for: DC History PZ3 .O749da
To see Orr’s papers and the manuscript version of the novel, ask for: MS-532
To watch A Shot in the Dark, go to Jones Media Center and ask for: Jones Media DVD 8519

The Dartmouth College Library recently expanded its Dartmouth Authors Book Display program to include brief talks or blog postings by featured authors.

Prof. Calloway discusses his book Ledger Narratives: The Plains Indian Drawings of the Lansburgh Collection at Dartmouth College
Prof. Calloway discusses his book Ledger Narratives: The Plains Indian Drawings of the Lansburgh Collection at Dartmouth College

Colin Calloway (History & Native American Studies) has two books currently on display in Baker-Berry Library’s King Arthur Flour Café:   Pen and Ink Witchcraft: Treaties and Treaty Making in American Indian History (Oxford U. Press, 2013); and Ledger Narratives: The Plains Indian Drawings of the Lansburgh Collection at Dartmouth College (U. of Oklahoma Press, 2012).  He gave the inaugural book talk on May 21st, discussing Ledger Narratives, which grew out of the Hood Museum of Art’s Fall 2010 exhibit of the Mark Lansburgh Collection of ledger drawings, and the concurrent Leslie Humanities Center Institute, "Multiple Narratives in Plains Indian Ledger Art."

Ledger art is associated primarily with Cheyenne, Kiowa, and other Plains peoples, first appearing in the mid-late 19th century.  As contact between Native communities and American military, government agents, and traders increased, so did access to the accounting ledger books in which this art was drawn.  These drawings document – from a Native perspective – a time of tremendous and traumatic change for these communities.  A single drawing can tell a complex story, with footprints/animal tracks indicating travel and passage of time.  Many drawings depict battle scenes against both Native and non-Native enemies, with warriors often clearly identified by their regalia or associated glyphs.  Others depict daily life (hunting, courtship, social dances, etc.) or the encroachment of European American civilization and technologies.

Want to know more?

Join us for our next Dartmouth Authors book talk on Mon., June 24 at 4:00 pm.  Dr. Harvey Frommer (MALS) will speak on “Writing Baseball.” Mark your calendars!

Milk Money coverMilk Money was actually born at Dartmouth. I first uttered the idea for a book on the dairy industry to my friend Tom Zoellner, while we were sitting on a bench on the Dartmouth green. Zoellner, an author of numerous books including Uranium: War, Energy and the Rock that Shaped the World, was working on his MALS degree at Dartmouth and also teaching a class on creative nonfiction in White River Junction, of which I was a student.

The year was 2009 and the dairy industry was experiencing some of the lowest milk prices in history. It was a full blown "dairy crisis," and farmers were going bankrupt at a shocking rate. The whole thing wouldn't have meant much to me, except that my daughter went to daycare on a family dairy farm in Barnard. They were my connection to the dairy industry, and I was never able to hear bad news about milk prices in the same way again. I saw how hard that family worked, and that they made a high quality product consumers valued. Yet they were losing money, and it seemed unfair and un-American. A freelance journalist at the time, I thought it would be an interesting and worthy topic to investigate.

The first step in writing a nonfiction book (at least for a no-name like me) is to create a book proposal and a sample chapter; something to sell to a publishing house. Think of it like a business plan for a start-up hoping to win seed funding. It takes a lot of work researching, interviewing, organizing information, and then writing. I did the bulk of the quiet toiling in the clerestory carrels in Baker Library. Ever since my days at Vermont Law School, Baker has been the place I go when I really want to get something done. The placid atmosphere among the stacks, or at the tables on the third and fourth floors, makes me want to turn off the email and concentrate. I can work in other places, but Baker is the redoubt I have held as a solemn space for honest effort.

Kirk KardashianAbout a year after I finished the book proposal I was lucky enough to land a book contract with the University Press of New England. By that time, I was working as a writer at Dartmouth and had built a "tiny house" in my backyard as a writing studio. But I still returned to Baker to take out books and to use the amazing interlibrary loan programs, and as a staff member I didn't have to pay for the privilege. I work at Tuck now, and while there are plenty of quiet places here to work, I still take shelter in Baker when I have to be most productive. I look forward to continuing the habit with my next book, whatever it may be.

-Kirk Kardashian, Tuck School of Business

Kirk Kardashian is Senior Writer in the Office of Communications at the Tuck School of Business. His book Milk Money: Cash, Cows, and the Death of the American Dairy Farm is included in the current Dartmouth Authors book display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

The Living Moment coverMy recent book, The Living Moment: Modernism in a Broken World, was published by the Northwestern University Press and was my tenth book. In 2001 the Yale University Press published my Smiling Through the Cultural Catastrophe: Toward the Renewal of Higher Education. Neither of these books could have been written without the research capabilities of the Baker-Berry Library.

Smiling Through the Cultural Catastrophe reflected my experience in teaching Humanities 1-2 at Columbia University. The "catastrophe" was the fact that the founding works of Western civilization are not widely taught in our colleges. My book was based on the paradigm of Western civilization established by Leo Strauss and others: Athens and Jerusalem. The founding epic of Athens was the Iliad; the founding epic of Jerusalem was Exodus. Over the centuries we derived science and philosophy from Athens and religion from Jerusalem. Socrates emerged as the hero of philosophy, Jesus of religion. Neither wrote a word, but what they said has lived; and both were condemned to death.

Ensign Jeffrey Hart, 1953
Ensign Jeffrey Hart upon graduation from Officer Candidate School in 1953, Newport, RI

But without the research capabilities of Baker-Berry I would not have encountered a momentous debate within the Church. In about the year 300 an argument erupted: Clement of Alexandria and Origen maintained that the philosophy of Athens could be useful to the Church, but Tertullian replied that scripture was enough. That Clement and Origen eventually prevailed had profound results over the following centuries. Science could be taught, and scientists could work as teams within Western universities.

ii

Osama bin Laden was an effective but unaware promoter for my book, which appeared in 2001, soon after 9/11. The war of al Qaeda was a jihad against Western culture as it affected Middle Eastern Islam. I was invited to appear on the television program "Booknotes" to discuss my book and broadcast from its studio in Washington, D.C. As we talked on the air I could see the dome of the Capitol through a picture window.

At about that time, did al Qaeda strike in Washington, D.C.? Anthrax was found in a letter to Sen. Tom Daschle's office. The result was that mail delivery in D.C. ceased for several days, resulting in chaos.

Smiling Through the Cultural Catastrophe sold more copies as a result of "Booknotes" than the Yale University Press had anticipated.

iii

My recent book, The Living Moment: Modernism in a Broken World, also benefited from the research facilities of Baker-Berry. Here I was not writing about the ancient world but about authors I knew well and who are familiar to educated people, beginning with the chapter "Frost and Eliot: Modernisms." Here I had to retrieve articles I had read by various critics -- and a few I had written -- and might not have been able to find some of them in periodicals I once had read.

No problem!

The Baker-Berry reference staff not only located them but printed them out as I stood there and marveled.

-Jeffrey Hart, Dept. of English (Emeritus)

Prof. Hart's latest book, The Living Moment: Modernism in a Broken World, is included in the current Dartmouth Authors book display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.