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By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1919

Captain cited
Captain cited

"November 12, Monday, Misty and Cold.

Mother's birthday. Yes Mother I thought of you today as usual, but I just can't remember whether you are 32 or 33, anyway you are still young and happy. Please accept my loving congratulations.

Got up at 7:30 and had my omelette, jelly and hot coffee. I do enjoy jelly in the morning, and I hope you can have some for me "de temps en temps" [from time to time] when I am with you once again. All morning we boys cleaned our shoes, suits etc. for at 2. P. M. we went over to S. where the Medaille Militaire was given to a soldier, Capt. Mallet, head of our Autos Convoy and Capt. Geuin, Capt of our Groupe here received the Legion of Honor, then Buzby's section received the Croix de Guerre as did the boy who lost his hand, the account of which I sent you about a month ago. After we paraded around the field we came home in our camions [trucks] again. There were some U. S. troops there too, men who enlisted from our sections here. They had on their "Tommy" helmets and indeed looked queer.

After a late supper I received my mail and are as follows:- Mother, Oct. 12, Beth, Oct, 11, Dotty Haskall, Oct. 8, Marion Jewett and Theo, Oct. 5 and Irving Marshall Oct. 8. Marion sent me a picture of my new second cousin but at her stage of the "Game of Life" all little ones look alike to me. She seems very cute.

We hung around as usual, nor orders or anything. Bed 8:45."

November 12, 1917
November 12, 1917

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.

Fifty years ago, Robert B. Field Jr., a newly minted Dartmouth ’64, was nearing the end of Officer Candidate School at Naval Station Newport in Rhode Island. He was two months away from a training assignment in Brunswick, Georgia, and shortly after that, he would ship out of Norfolk, Virginia aboard the USS Long Beach. The Long Beach would travel widely with Field aboard — to Roosevelt Roads Naval Station in Puerto Rico, back to Virginia, through the Panama Canal, up the West Coast to its namesake city in California, a stop at Pearl Harbor, another at Subic Bay in the Philippines — but by the close of 1965, it would be en route to the Gulf of Tonkin, Vietnam.

As Field’s military service was unfolding, two Dartmouth ’68s were just beginning their studies. John C. Everett Jr. and John G. Spritzler both arrived on campus in the fall of 1964, and over the next four years, their paths would take markedly different turns. By 1969, Everett would be bound for Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam, aboard the USS Gallup. Spritzler would be a committed anti-war activist and a central figure in a protest that defined an era in Dartmouth history: the seizure and occupation of Parkhurst Hall on May 6, and the ensuing standoff with police that lasted well into the night.

Decades after the last American troops withdrew from Vietnam, all three men sat down with a member of the Class of 2016 to share their memories of the war. Their conversations were audio recorded, and along with three others, now comprise the first products of the Dartmouth Vietnam Project. The DVP, a collaborative effort involving Dartmouth students, faculty, and staff, seeks to preserve and share the stories of alumni and other members of the wider Dartmouth community who experienced the Vietnam War years firsthand. Students specially trained in the art of oral history conduct the interviews, and the resulting audio and text transcripts become part of a growing oral history collection at Rauner.

As of Veterans Day 2014, the first six interviews — Field, Everett, and Spritzler among them — are available on a dedicated DVP website (http://www.dartmouth.edu/~dvp). In the coming months and years, more and more interviews from veterans, activists, and those with memories of the impact of the war on Dartmouth and American society in general will join the original six. If you or somebody you know has a story to share, visit http://www.dartmouth.edu/~dvp/participate.html.

Fifty years ago, Robert B. Field Jr., a newly minted Dartmouth ’64, was nearing the end of Officer Candidate School at Naval Station Newport in Rhode Island. He was two months away from a training assignment in Brunswick, Georgia, and shortly after that, he would ship out of Norfolk, Virginia aboard the USS Long Beach. The Long Beach would travel widely with Field aboard — to Roosevelt Roads Naval Station in Puerto Rico, back to Virginia, through the Panama Canal, up the West Coast to its namesake city in California, a stop at Pearl Harbor, another at Subic Bay in the Philippines — but by the close of 1965, it would be en route to the Gulf of Tonkin, Vietnam.

As Field’s military service was unfolding, two Dartmouth ’68s were just beginning their studies. John C. Everett Jr. and John G. Spritzler both arrived on campus in the fall of 1964, and over the next four years, their paths would take markedly different turns. By 1969, Everett would be bound for Cam Ranh Bay, Vietnam, aboard the USS Gallup. Spritzler would be a committed anti-war activist and a central figure in a protest that defined an era in Dartmouth history: the seizure and occupation of Parkhurst Hall on May 6, and the ensuing standoff with police that lasted well into the night.

Decades after the last American troops withdrew from Vietnam, all three men sat down with a member of the Class of 2016 to share their memories of the war. Their conversations were audio recorded, and along with three others, now comprise the first products of the Dartmouth Vietnam Project. The DVP, a collaborative effort involving Dartmouth students, faculty, and staff, seeks to preserve and share the stories of alumni and other members of the wider Dartmouth community who experienced the Vietnam War years firsthand. Students specially trained in the art of oral history conduct the interviews, and the resulting audio and text transcripts become part of a growing oral history collection at Rauner.

As of Veterans Day 2014, the first six interviews — Field, Everett, and Spritzler among them — are available on a dedicated DVP website (http://www.dartmouth.edu/~dvp). In the coming months and years, more and more interviews from veterans, activists, and those with memories of the impact of the war on Dartmouth and American society in general will join the original six. If you or somebody you know has a story to share, visit http://www.dartmouth.edu/~dvp/participate.html.

1

The American Library Association annual conference concluded in early July and while at the conference I gave a presentation to the Book and Paper Interest Group of the Preservation and Reformatting Section of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. The theme was "Space Oddity" and the presentation had to be given in an Ignite Talk style, in our case 15 slides at 20 seconds each for a total of 5 minutes.

What follows are the slides and my comments for each.

Canes of Dartmouth College
1800-2008






This storage solution for Dartmouth's collection of canes was created by North Bennet Street School summer interns, Becky Koch and Laren Schott, with oversight from Deborah Howe, the Collections Conservator.












The problem was how to store these wooden canes. The bulk of the collection were canes hand carved by Dartmouth students during their senior year. The most common embellishment of the cane head is what is know as the "Indian Head Cane".


Here Deborah and the interns are arranging the canes by size.

Prior to this treatment the canes were stored in a type of umbrella stand with open sides and very little protection. The canes were not stable and would slip and slide within the stand. The enclosure solution used both pre-made boxes and custom fit inserts. To begin, the canes were sorted by size. Most of the canes were a standard length. 




The canes were surfaced cleaned prior to rehousing them. To surface clean them our interns took dry and sometimes slightly moistened (with water) cotton swabs and wiped away soot and dust. No repairs were necessary. All of the canes were in generally good shape.




The housing solution consisted of adapting a pre-made box to hold an insert tray, and thus created two layers for storage: a bottom layer and the insert tray forming the second layer.

Pre-made box.
The pre-made box was purchased from Gaylord. It was made of polypropylene measuring 
38 inches x 24 inches, and about 6 inches deep.


Using heavy, natural cotton webbing, handles for the pre-made box were created and reinforded with Vyvek to help support the weight. The Vyvek is shown inside the box, where the cloth webbing is threaded through. Deborah suggests that in the next iteration of this box she would improve it by adding support stops for the insert tray to the pre-made box.



The insert tray was fabricated from 2 pieces of blue, acid free corrugated board. Adaptations were made because a single sheet was not large enough to build the walls up.

     





For the insert box special attention was also paid in building handles that could withstand the weight of the canes. To do this the cotton webbing was threaded through the bottom of the tray that had been reinforced with a layer of 40pt board for extra support.
                       































In order to separate the canes from each other dividers were made from 10 point map folder stock. The folder stock was creased and folded to create a pocket. Each pocket was about 2 inches deep and 3 inches wide. Two pieces of folder stock were needed to create each divider layer.


To construct the dividers score lines were determined and a pattern was made from a strip of paper. These marks were transferred to the 10 point folder stock.


Both short edges of the 10 point were marked, then the pencil marks were lined up on the edge of the table. The 10 point was creased cross grain to maximize length and to improve rigidity in the walls of the dividers. Because of the length creasing on the board shear was not possible.



The dividers were placed on both the bottom layer and the insert tray. They were not attached in any way – although they could be if desired. Deborah suggests sliding in 40 point strips inside the divider walls to give additional support and rigidity.






With the dividers in place the canes were arranged on each layer and the insert tray placed on top. Each box can hold 16 canes: 2 layers of 8 canes each. When each box set was constructed it was bar coded and labeled with the archival series number.


Bottom layer with canes.



























Insert layer in the box with divider and canes.


There were also canes of irregular size: longer than the rest or with heads that made it difficult to apply a standard approach. For these canes the divider was placed diagonally in the box and the canes arranged accordingly.




By the end of the project over 100 canes were cleaned and stored in 8 custom boxes for 24 linear feet, and shelved in the Special Collections remote storage facility. A finding aid for the cane collection now lists the canes by individual box number thus improving not only the storage but also making it easier to retrieve a single cane. By this single conservation treatment both storage and retrieval have been improved.



Thanks to Deborah Howe for collaborating with me to create this Ignite Talk and to Becky Koch and Lauren Schott who designed this storage solution.



Written by Barb Sagraves

The American Library Association annual conference concluded in early July and while at the conference I gave a presentation to the Book and Paper Interest Group of the Preservation and Reformatting Section of the Association for Library Collections & Technical Services. The theme was "Space Oddity" and the presentation had to be given in an Ignite Talk style, in our case 15 slides at 20 seconds each for a total of 5 minutes.

What follows are the slides and my comments for each.

Canes of Dartmouth College
1800-2008

This storage solution for Dartmouth's collection of canes was created by North Bennet Street School summer interns, Becky Koch and Laren Schott, with oversight from Deborah Howe, the Collections Conservator.


The problem was how to store these wooden canes. The bulk of the collection were canes hand carved by Dartmouth students during their senior year. The most common embellishment of the cane head is what is know as the "Indian Head Cane".
Here Deborah and the interns are arranging the canes by size.

Prior to this treatment the canes were stored in a type of umbrella stand with open sides and very little protection. The canes were not stable and would slip and slide within the stand. The enclosure solution used both pre-made boxes and custom fit inserts. To begin, the canes were sorted by size. Most of the canes were a standard length. 

The canes were surfaced cleaned prior to rehousing them. To surface clean them our interns took dry and sometimes slightly moistened (with water) cotton swabs and wiped away soot and dust. No repairs were necessary. All of the canes were in generally good shape.

The housing solution consisted of adapting a pre-made box to hold an insert tray, and thus created two layers for storage: a bottom layer and the insert tray forming the second layer.

Pre-made box.
The pre-made box was purchased from Gaylord. It was made of polypropylene measuring 
38 inches x 24 inches, and about 6 inches deep.
Using heavy, natural cotton webbing, handles for the pre-made box were created and reinforded with Vyvek to help support the weight. The Vyvek is shown inside the box, where the cloth webbing is threaded through. Deborah suggests that in the next iteration of this box she would improve it by adding support stops for the insert tray to the pre-made box.

The insert tray was fabricated from 2 pieces of blue, acid free corrugated board. Adaptations were made because a single sheet was not large enough to build the walls up.

     

For the insert box special attention was also paid in building handles that could withstand the weight of the canes. To do this the cotton webbing was threaded through the bottom of the tray that had been reinforced with a layer of 40pt board for extra support.
                       

In order to separate the canes from each other dividers were made from 10 point map folder stock. The folder stock was creased and folded to create a pocket. Each pocket was about 2 inches deep and 3 inches wide. Two pieces of folder stock were needed to create each divider layer.

To construct the dividers score lines were determined and a pattern was made from a strip of paper. These marks were transferred to the 10 point folder stock.

Both short edges of the 10 point were marked, then the pencil marks were lined up on the edge of the table. The 10 point was creased cross grain to maximize length and to improve rigidity in the walls of the dividers. Because of the length creasing on the board shear was not possible.

The dividers were placed on both the bottom layer and the insert tray. They were not attached in any way – although they could be if desired. Deborah suggests sliding in 40 point strips inside the divider walls to give additional support and rigidity.

With the dividers in place the canes were arranged on each layer and the insert tray placed on top. Each box can hold 16 canes: 2 layers of 8 canes each. When each box set was constructed it was bar coded and labeled with the archival series number.
Bottom layer with canes.

Insert layer in the box with divider and canes.
There were also canes of irregular size: longer than the rest or with heads that made it difficult to apply a standard approach. For these canes the divider was placed diagonally in the box and the canes arranged accordingly.

By the end of the project over 100 canes were cleaned and stored in 8 custom boxes for 24 linear feet, and shelved in the Special Collections remote storage facility. A finding aid for the cane collection now lists the canes by individual box number thus improving not only the storage but also making it easier to retrieve a single cane. By this single conservation treatment both storage and retrieval have been improved.

Thanks to Deborah Howe for collaborating with me to create this Ignite Talk and to Becky Koch and Lauren Schott who designed this storage solution.

Written by Barb Sagraves

By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1919

Ready for leave (10 days)
Ready for leave (10 days)

"November 11, 1917, Sunday, Rain but fair later.

Up at 8:00, and after breakfast, roll call, a briquet-man came around while we were all reading so we cracked some bargains. After dinner, read and wrote a bit and took a few pictures of camp. It is so muddy, I didn't go for a walk, but staid around camp reading and writing. After supper we hung around and did nothing but build castles of smoke and dreams when we got home, and of home. Bed 9:30."

November 11, 1917 (1 of 2)
November 11, 1917
(1 of 2)
November 11, 1917 (2 of 2)
November 11, 1917
(2 of 2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to first entry
To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.

By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1919

Chipman_Nov10_Photo

"November 10, 1917, Saturday, Rain, Cold.

Up at 7:30 and had omelette and confiture [jam] for breakfast. (Our grub is swell here) then after roll call we just hung around reading, talking, etc. At 11 had dinner, then I wrote till 4 o'clock and as it cleared up, a bunch of us went down to the Y. M. C. A. to arrange a program. Bottomley and I then went down to our little restaurant whose sign reads "autant ici qu'ailleurs" (as much here as any place else.) Here 9 of us had a swell feed cooked for us, mutton, potatoes, green peas, fresh bread, confiture and jelly, coffee with condensed milk and some good "Bull Durham". Believe me it was some lunch-feed. Just think we sat on real stools, ate with real honest to goodness forks, spoons, plates, tumblers, but we had to use our own knives as you probably can imagine where extra house-hold steel is.

After the food, the bunch of us went out to the Y. M. C. A. again and we gang gave a concert. Fat Bottomley sang and he was a scream. After we came home and got to bed 11:30."

November 10, 1917
November 10, 1917

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.

By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1919

Chipman_Nov9_Photo
"Young poilus" [Ed: Poilus were French army infantrymen. The term poilu means "hairy one" and implied the rustic origins of most of the soldiers while directly referencing their typically hairy faces.]
"November 9, 1917. Friday, Intermittant rains.

Up at 7:45 and got to roll call just in time only to hear read to us one of the most dastardly orders I ever heard. A captain down here, tho fulfilling his duty I suppose, but not understanding the nature and calibre of Americans threatened to put into prison with one blanket, bread and water anyone who did anything contrary to his orders or rules. Well, in the course of our morning, we were informed six of our boys were ordered to the "jug." This was our limit. We have been used hard and been "sat on" and our high motive to serve with which we came over has gradually been turned to hate toward men who refuse to acknowledge our motive and to understand us, but treat us as if we were 2nd class low down poilus. The climax came this morning when the captain came down and took six of our men, one of whom was Georgie Pratt, my old remorque-mate [trailer-mate]. We got the boys together and chose a committee and signed a statement (88 in all) that if these boys were not released and real military punishment given them instead of this monarchial action, after the boys had been told for what reason they were being punished, we would hereafter cease offering our services. Anyway, the boys had to go up to the jail, and stay there all day, but in the P. M. we got the chefs busy and our captain was forced to release them by orders of Captain Mallet, the head of this transport service. He is a wonderful man, anyway, and this action made him all the more our favorite. Well, to come back to Georgie. The sergeant of our new section here, Winslow, and I started up to "prison" with a good feed for our boys (we were going to smuggle in the grub if they wouldn't let us by) when we no sooner got started than they came past us and sprung us the dope they were released from the service and were leaving for Paris at 1 A. M.  So I was helping George pack up when he was all of a sudden sent for to report to the bureau. On his return we found he was free, that he had gone to prison for nothing and that it was another Pratt they wanted and not George. Believe me, I was relieved but I was sore for the error they made. Anyway, Alberts, formerly of our section 184, was sent but still I don't know for what reason and I guess he doesn't. He is a good sort of a boy, so I am sending him out to the house to call with the preceding papers of this.

After supper we played cards and turned in, 9:30 after someday."

November 9, 1917 (1 of 2)
November 9, 1917
(1 of 2)
November 9, 1917 (2 of 2)
November 9, 1917
(2 of 2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.

By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1919

Chipman_Nov8_Photo

"November 8, 1917. Thursday, Fair.

Nothing much all day. Couldn't work on the car as the boy who had the car before me had the keys to the tool and side boxes so was free as he was away. Hung around the Y. M. C. A. but came back for supper and read, then bed 10:30."

 

Nov8A
November 8, 1917
(1 of 2)
November 8, 1917 (2 of 2)
November 8, 1917
(2 of 2 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.

By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1919

Chipman_Nov7_Photo

"November 7, 1917. Wednesday, Rain.

Was awakened at 6:30 to go up to north of O. and take some plaques tournantes or revolving switches for the many miniature railways here. Two cars left here at 7:00 and it took all day to "ship" them some 40 kilometers by our transport camions [trucks]. We saw little as a drizzly rain fell all day and it was disagreeable riding. Got back at 4:30 and had supper then dried out around the fire till 8:45, then went to bed and read a bit. (The Woman Gives, by Owen Johnson) interesting but weird) then I guess I fell asleep with the candle still burning about 10:00."

November 7, 1917
November 7, 1917

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.

By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1918

To Mt. Notre Dame
To Mt. Notre Dame

"November 6, Tuesday, Fair.

This A. M. we got up at 7:30 and after breakfast, got together all our belongings for we were ordered to change camps. So at 10:30 every boy in our camp had his things together and at this hour, this section broke up. We came down to the other side of the village here (20 of us, Pete luckily included) and moved into the barracks where Erney was first and which Archie has just left. I am now in Groupement 526 Section C, Barracks 6 and the boys are fine. But as soon as you receive this you had better not try and write me any more for I shall probably be home before they would reach me.

Well we had dinner (the food is much better than at our old camp) and got settled. Pete and the bunch and I went up the Y. M. C. A. for awhile but came back in time for supper. After supper we sat around the fire (we have a stove in the barracks and believe me, it is comfortable) till time for movies at the Y. M. C. A. but as we were going up, we saw a red glare in the sky so we went over to the next town L. and saw a barn on fire caused by some careless soldiers in the straw from pipe or cigarette lighting. After a good movie show we came home and turned in. Georgey Pratt was put in another section but as he had no bed he slept under me after we made a sort of mattress of my heavy coat, sweaters, bags, etc. Anyway he says the boards were hard just the same. Bed 11:00."

November 6, 1917 (1 of 2)
November 6, 1917
(1 of 2)
November 6, 1917 (2 of 2)
November 6, 1917
(2 of 2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to first entry

To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.

By John Hale Chipman, Class of 1919

Chipman_Nov_5_Photo

"November 5, Monday, Rain.

Up at 9:00. Touched up the car a bit. Went over to see Chaunce Hood [Dartmouth class of 1918] as his time was up today and he is leaving for home. Also hope you can see or hear from him again when he arrives. Today a Frenchman came up to buy stuff and as I have only a month more I sold my rubber boots for 15 francs. I bought them for 20 you know so as I had worn them quite a bit I figured that I had made a rather good bargain. After supper, hung around. Bed 10:30."

November 5, 1917
November 5, 1917

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Previous entry  |   Next entry  |  Go to first entry
To see the actual diary, come to Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall and ask to see MS-1229 during normal hours of operation.