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Wheelan photoHolding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

To kick off the fall term, we hear from economist Charles "Charlie" Wheelan, Class of 1988, Senior Lecturer and Policy Fellow at the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy.  Wheelan, former correspondent for The Economistis the author of the "Naked" series: Naked Economics (W.W. Norton, 2002), Naked Statistics (W.W. Norton, 2013), and the latest, Naked Money (W.W. Norton, 2016).  What advice does the prolific writer offer those who get stuck?  To power through the early drafts.

What is your book about?

It describes what "money" is and why it matters. In the process, I try to explain the broader global financial system.

Where did you get your ideas for this book?

Money is such a strange phenomenon. (That $100 bill in your wallet is just a piece of paper.) Yet finance has a huge impact on all of our lives, as we learned during the 2007/2008 financial crisis. I wanted to explore and demystify all this.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

Most of my work is applied. I take other people's ideas and make them more accessible. I'm also the founder of Unite America, which is an effort to re-empower the political middle by electing independents.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

I'm hoping that libraries will always be physical spaces, as well as repositories of information. They should be a place where we share important community resources, whether that is computer terminals or just good air-conditioning when it's really hot outside.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

The first draft is always awful. Just power through.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

I've always made time to read for fun, ever since I was a Dartmouth undergrad. I once read War and Peace while hitchhiking in New Zealand. I currently alternate between fiction and nonfiction.

 

photo of douglas irwinHolding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

In this week's edition, we talk with Douglas Irwin, the John French Professor of Economics.  Irwin, an expert on trade history, recently published Clashing over Commerce: A History of U.S. Trade Policy (University of Chicago Press, 2017).  The book has already received an enthusiastic reception from the media and academic peers, particularly in this era of intensifying debate around steel tariffs and other trade policies.  In spite of a busy schedule of media appearances, research, and teaching, Irwin made time to speak with the Library about his book.  And what he likes reading!

What is your book about?

The history of US trade policy from the very beginning (1763 or so) up to now.

Where do you get your ideas?

Often by thinking about the work of others.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

Could not work at all without the resources of the Baker-Berry Library!

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

No idea, but I hope it always remains a place for discovering things and meeting people.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Persistence: the key to writing is rewriting, and if you do a little every day it adds up over time.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

Aside from obscure and boring economics books, usually history, or instead of that...more history!  I just checked out The Year without Summer about a volcano eruption in 1816 that darkened and cooled the globe for a year and cause big crop problems in America, leading to food shortages and hard times. A great case of the environment affecting the economy.

Jean Tirole, the freshly minted 2014 Nobel Prize Winner in Economic Sciences, is well represented in the Dartmouth College Library Collections.The list of books he has authored or co-authored can be found in the Library Catalog. The full-text of his … Continue reading

Nobel Prize

Jean Tirole, the freshly minted 2014 Nobel Prize Winner in Economic Sciences, is well represented in the Dartmouth College Library collections.The list of books he has authored or co-authored can be found in the Library Catalog. The full-text of his articles and working papers can be found in several of the databases the Library makes available to the Dartmouth community. His most frequently cited article, “Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation,” was published in the July 2003 issue of The Review of Economic Studies and is available in the JSTOR database.The Library’s Economics Research Guide is a useful tool for exploring his other work.