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This term Dartmouth College Library is proud to promote an exhibit by our current Edward Connery Lathem '51 Special Collections Fellow, Jaime Eeg '18, titled "Let's Get Lunch: An Exhibit for the Discerning Palate." The exhibit highlights cookbooks from our rare book collections and will be on display at Rauner Special Collections Library in Webster Hall, upstairs in the Class of 1965 Galleries, from April 5th through June 7th, 2019.

We all need food. Without it, we cannot survive. Yet the human relationship with food is intricate, complex, and varies widely across individuals and cultures. Our relationship with food can be at once deeply personal and private while also serving as a bridge to connect with others, sometimes meaningfully and sometimes just superficially. We've all heard the old platitude, "let's get lunch sometime," a statement upon which potential connections can either flourish or wither. Given the opportunity, food has the power to draw us in and connect us with each other, just as cookbooks can connect us to the people and cultures who created them.
Food can also help us build communities. Shared experience helps create strong foundations between individuals and larger groups of people, and shared meals are a common avenue for those experiences. Just as food helps us build meaningful connections across groups, an understanding of the food from another culture or time helps foster deeper, meaningful understanding of those cultures and times. Cookbooks can offer a valuable way to access that potential for understanding.
And food can simply be fun! Cooking and cookbooks can be artistic or experimental, and cooking or eating together complements and strengthens existing relationships. Meals are an excellent excuse to spend quality time with people we care about. After all, we all need food.

If you're hungry for more about food and Dartmouth, come  take a look at the selected recipes at Special Collections. Also, stay connected on social media for updates about opportunities to sample some actual treats made from the recipes in the exhibit. If you can't make it over to the exhibit in person, you can read more about it online here.

Please join us for:
Territory (Territorio) an exhibition by Ragko (Julio Muñoz) in Berry 183

Open-Air Painting
Tues 5/22: 2-6pm Baker Main Hall
Gallery Talk + Reception
Fri 5/25: 6-8pm Berry 183

For Ragko, the language of art expresses the most profound connections of being in a territory. He creates new visual expressions to evoke historical memory and project emergent identity formation, with the ultimate goal of contributing to the recuperation of the Mapuche Pueblo. “Territory” explores these new identity formations within rapidly shifting climates. His exhibition at Dartmouth projects landscapes from perspectives of tangible spaces – like flora and fauna endemic to Mapuche-Williche territory – towards the intangible, with a cultural presence beyond the recognizable.

Ragko (Julio Muñoz) holds degrees in Architecture from the Pontificia Universidad Católica in Santiago, and in Fine Arts from the Universidad de Chile. Ragko has practiced visual arts through a variety of expressions: drawing, wood sculpting, metallurgy, oil painting, graphic design, and video and photography. Parallel to his artistic work, he works professionally in both industrial and graphic design. He teaches art to children and youth in communities that are socioculturally marginalized in Chilean society to help shape their artistic expression. He assumes the conditional identity that influences all his art, namely his belonging, since childhood, to the alto txen txen, a site of cultural signification for Mapuche-Williche people in the sector of Rawe, Osorno. His cosmovision manifests from this belonging – this being – rooted in the physical and temporal dimensions, as well as the traditions and dreamscapes of this territory.

The name Ragko derives from the mixture of water and clay. Rawe, the place where he was born and lives, roughly translates to the place of clay.

Ragko articulates his work in collections. This form produces expressive, methodological, and aesthetic possibilities linked to the life processes and ancestral identity of being Mapuche-Williche. This ‘doing-with’ corresponds with the rhythms of life itself and finds expression within the visual display of his work as a collection. His work navigates diverse conceptual and physical territories, and resides in harbors that connect to other places of internal or external importance, old or new. Within this residence, his art consolidates the definitive patterns.

This visit is sponsored by the Leslie Center for the Humanities, Native American Studies, Latin American, Latino, & Caribbean Studies, Dept. of Studio Art, Dept. of Geography, and classroom visits made possible by the Rockefeller Center Classroom.

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College campuses have a long history as sites of activism and protest. It’s a truth acknowledged easily enough by today’s students, who have witnessed and in some cases participated in current movements like Black Lives Matter, #NoDAPL, and the Women’s March on Washington, among numerous others. What may be less apparent is the role the college plays when the activism dust settles.

At Dartmouth, the archivists of Rauner Special Collections Library are committed to recording the College’s history—the history of many years ago and the history of yesterday—through primary source documents. Campus activism is a significant part of this history, and one of the most effective ways of capturing it is via first-person narrative.

Oral history is an interview-based approach to documenting the past, centering around an in-depth, recorded conversation between two people: the oral historian and an individual who experienced a particular event, era, or culture firsthand. Because of its emphasis on non-dominant perspectives and marginalized voices, oral history is uniquely situated among history methodologies to document moments of protest and dissent. It is, at its heart, a means of telling stories that might otherwise have gone untold.

This exhibit explores three protest movements in Dartmouth’s past, and a selection of oral history interviews with individuals who experienced them. These interviews and many more are available at Rauner Special Collections Library.

Exhibit curated by Caitlin Birch, Digital Collections and Oral History Archivist, and designed by Dennis Grady, Library Education & Outreach.

Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: May 1 - July  30, 2017

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Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds, Baker-Berry Library, Baker Main Hall, January 6-March 31, 2017. Exhibit reception: Wednesday, January 25, 3-4:30pmA new exhibit in the Baker-Berry Library at Dartmouth, Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds, provides a window onto the unique culture and environment of the ‘Roof of the World.’ This exhibit explores the social and religious practices that shape life in Asia’s high mountain environments, explores the political history of the region, and describes some of the encounters between foreigners and Himalayan and Tibetan people over time. The exhibit has been curated by Senior Lecturer Kenneth Bauer and Associate Professor Sienna Craig, who have lived and worked in the region for decades.

Tibetan and Himalayan Lifeworlds is enriched by the presence on campus of artist Tenzin Norbu. Born in 1970 in the Himalayan region of Dolpo, Nepal, Norbu studied traditional thangka painting as well as Buddhism from his father, following a lineage of painters that dates back more than 400 years. He is now one of the leading figures in contemporary Tibetan art.  In addition to being a painter and lama (religious and community leader), Norbu is a social entrepreneur, encouraging education and sustainable development in one of Nepal’s most remote districts.

Photo credit: Jens Kirkeby
Photo credit: Jens Kirkeby

Norbu’s repertoire ranges from traditional imagery to unique depictions of daily life, religious practice, and landscape. His work was highlighted in the 1998 film Himalaya (Caravan), the only Nepali film to have been nominated for an Academy Award. Over the past fifteen years, Norbu’s work has been featured in exhibitions in global cities, from Kathmandu and New York City, to Aarhus, Monaco, Lucerne, Paris, Osaka, Tokyo, and Thimphu, Bhutan.

Norbu was one of the artists in Tradition Transformed: Tibetan Artists Respond, an exhibit which originated at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City, and traveled to the HOOD Museum in 2010. Norbu is the illustrator of five children’s books, including Clear Sky, Red Earth: A Himalayan Story, a project on which he collaborated with Professor Sienna Craig (Anthropology) and which has been published in both English and Tibetan.

On January 19 and 25, 2017, Norbu will spend time (9:30am – 2:30pm) painting in the Baker-Berry corridor. A reception for the artist and to celebrate the exhibit will take place on January 25, from 3-4:30pm. Norbu will also be visiting classes and staging a popup exhibit of some of his recent work at the Black Family Arts Center, beginning January 17.

A Lot of Good This Daylight's Gonna Do Us - Cult Cinema from 1968 to 1988: Three Directors is on display in  Baker-Berry Library, Berry Main Street: January 5 - March 11, 2016. This exhibit examines the work of John Carpenter, David Cronenberg, and George Romero within their larger cultural context. Curator Wesley Benash explains his long-standing interest in the subject:

Cult Film exhibit poster"When I was six years old, by father let me rent Brian De Palma’s film Carrie from the video store.  It scared the hell out of me, but it also spawned a lifelong fascination with the shadowy, macabre underbelly of the cinema.  As a young boy and teenager, I was interested in these films for their sensational elements –violence, gore, and sex.  As I grew up, I began to appreciate them for their sociopolitical elements instead, and I came to understand how less reputable forms of cinema, such as the horror film and exploitation film, frequently had much to say about the societies in which they were produced.  As a student, I have parlayed this interest in cult film into scholarship; the admiration and appreciation I have for these films serves as the backbone of the thesis I am writing in Dartmouth’s Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program.

"The films on display, and others like them, tend to function as cinema’s id, forcing us to acknowledge the ugliness within society and within ourselves; it is for this reason that they repulse so many viewers.  But for those who are willing to open their minds to these films, they are equally audacious and enlightening.

"I obsessively watched the works of John Carpenter, David Cronenberg, and George Romero as a boy and teenager.  I think they are great artists and that their best work stands up to the finest products of Hollywood, Italian neorealism, the French New Wave, or any other period in cinema history.  It is my hope that upon viewing their work, you will feel the same."

Exhibit curated by Wesley Benash; design by Dennis Grady, Library Education and Outreach.

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

DartmouthX:  Collaboration
by Pat Fisken, Head of Paddock Music Library, and Memory Apata, Music Library Specialist

"Introduction to Opera" DartmouthX team
"Introduction to Opera" DartmouthX team

Dartmouth has just completed the third of four edX courses this year, continuing to model a team approach to course design in the MOOC (massive open online course) format. Professor of Music Steve Swayne's course in Italian Opera has been a collaborative project in the best sense, as all team members not only offer their special skills but also support the work of one another through regular team consultation and stepping in when assistance is needed.

Design process for the "Introduction to Opera" DartmouthX course
Design process for the "Introduction to Opera" DartmouthX course

Three library staff members contributed significantly to the OperaX MOOC endeavor.  Pat Fisken (Head of Paddock Music Library) was involved in the initial and ongoing learning objectives and design process, selected and purchased media content, researched and searched for online open source content (images and text), crafted citations, and helped with publicity for the course.  Memory Apata (Music Library Specialist) was hired as the Lead TA for the course and, in addition to being actively engaged with OperaX students through the discussion boards, she was involved in the continuing design process of the course, initiated publicity, and developed and managed social media.  David Bowden (Music Library Specialist) assisted with the digitizing and excerpting of media content to be used within the lecture videos created for the course.The course design process, including contributions from faculty, instructional designers, media specialists, librarians, and students, is summarized in this diagram. Read more about the Library and the opera MOOC here: http://bit.ly/1SLVmiv

 

Active Learning Assessment 
by Heather Johnson, Research and Education Librarian

Johnson poster
Heather Johnson's poster, "Teaching Strategy Matters: Engagement Impacts Application"

Heather Johnson, Research and Education Librarian at the Biomedical Libraries, recently ran a case study to compare the effectiveness of active learning via a jigsaw activity versus passive instruction via a traditional lecture. To assess memory retention and application, she employed two assessment methods: A Jeopardy activity for memory retention, and a bibliographic analysis for application. She found the results interesting, and she deduced that passive instruction was more effective in terms of activating students’ short-term memory, and that active learning resulted in students being able to produce higher quality bibliographies when scored against a rubric evaluating for the authority of sources. Heather presented the results of the case study at the North Atlantic Health Sciences annual meeting; her poster can be found here: http://bit.ly/1NvbXI1

 

Surrealism and the Spanish Avant-Garde in the Dartmouth College Library 
by Jill Baron, Librarian for Romance Languages and Latin American, Latino/a and Caribbean Studies

Librarian Jill Baron and Profesor José del Pino share their exhibit with students
Librarian Jill Baron and Profesor José del Pino share their exhibit with students

The Fall 2015 exhibit on Berry Main Street, "'Prepare Your Skeleton for the Air': Surrealism and the Spanish Avant-Garde in the Dartmouth College Library," promoted two events at Dartmouth: the Department of Spanish & Portuguese conference "Dalí, Lorca & Buñuel in America" October 15-17, 2015, and the upper-level Spanish course "Dalí, Lorca, and Buñuel: The Secrets of Spanish Surrealism,"  given by Professor José del Pino, who also organized the conference.   Featuring materials from the Dartmouth Library's collections, the exhibit shows the influence of surrealism on the work of Salvador Dalí (1904-1989), Federico García Lorca (1898-1936), and Luis Buñuel (1900-1983), and other materials related to three of Spain's most important artistic figures of the 20th century.  Preparations for the exhibit involved Jill Baron, Librarian for Romance Languages and Latin American, Latino/a and Caribbean Studies, Dennis Grady, Exhibits Designer, and Professor del Pino. Contributions were also made by students from the DALI Lab, principally Jake Gaba ‘17, who produced the exhibit’s video montage. Students of SPAN 40 visited the exhibit with Professor del Pino. Being able to see on display some of the books and visual material they were analyzing in depth in the classroom proved to be a remarkable experience in the establishment of productive linkage between the theoretical approach of the course with a selection of pertinent cultural products from which class discussion emanated. More information on the exhibit can be found on the Library's website: http://bit.ly/1Hb0RXG

 

Carson 61: Active Learning Space Incubator 
by Mike Goudzwaard, Instructional Designer

Carson 61
Yusaku Horiuchi teaching Data Visualization in Carson 61

This past summer, Carson 61 was remodeled from a computer lab to Dartmouth’s newest active learning classroom. Starting this fall term, seven courses met in the Berry Innovator Classroom (Carson 61), using the moveable furniture, team video displays, and collaboration software to explore active learning in the redesigned classroom. The Berry Innovator Classroom is intended to be an “incubator” to try new learning activities, model different classroom design, and inform future classroom renovations at Dartmouth. The redesign of Carson 61 was a collaborative effort including Classroom Technologies, Educational Technologies, DCAL, and the Library.

Baker Tower

Screen Shot 2015-05-31 at 8.57.31 PMA new exhibit in Berry Main Street, "Open Dartmouth: Research, Data, Code, Ideas," highlights faculty and researchers at Dartmouth who believe in the importance of sharing their work freely.  This exhibit follows on the heels of the Dartmouth Arts & Sciences faculty's recent adoption of an open access policy, yet seeks to broaden the notion of what "open" means by highlighting diverse types of scholarly sharing.  The faculty and researchers featured in this exhibit describe in their own words how and why they make their work available on the open web.  By presenting the rationale for why these researchers choose “open,” this exhibit aims to foster critical awareness about access to knowledge in today’s digital environment.

Members of the Education & Outreach committee and the Working Group on Open Access, including Jill Baron, Sarah Scully, Shirley Zhao, Barbara DeFelice, Laura Barrett and Janifer Holt, collaborated on producing this exhibit, soliciting participation from a wide range of campus scholars.  Special thanks goes to Sarah Scully and Dennis Grady for the poster design.

The Open Dartmouth that you currently see is just the beginning of a series of physical exhibits featuring Dartmouth faculty and researchers.  We welcome the opportunity to feature more scholars, whether they be faculty, students, or staff.  So tell us, why do YOU share your work?  Let us know, and we’ll include you in part 2 of “Open Dartmouth”, scheduled for Fall 2015. We welcome recommendations too!  Please contact Jill Baron or Barbara DeFelice.

Students compare notes on rare books at Rauner Library
Students compare notes on rare books at Rauner Library

Several parts of the Library were ‘shadowed’ last Thursday by some engaged, lively 8th grade students as part of the Upper Valley Business & Education Partnership (UVBEP)’s Job Shadow Day outreach effort, coordinated on campus by the Office of Human Resources. Rauner Special Collections Library, Kresge Physical Sciences Library, and the Library’s Acquisitions Department put together two programs and hosted five students altogether.

Students visiting Rauner Library toured the stacks, where they met Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer and handled first editions of Dr. Seuss's children's books. They also learned how materials come into the library and are prepared for research use, and then participated in several classroom exercises using primary sources from the archives, rare book collections, and manuscript holdings.

Students completed an Earth Day exhibit at Kresge Library
Students completed an Earth Day exhibit at Kresge Library

Other students started the morning at Kresge Physical Sciences Library, where they researched the Library’s holdings for books related to Earth Day, ordered a book or two for the Library and used Kresge’s circulation system to check books out to create an Earth Day exhibit. They then headed over to Acquisitions, where they processed the online book orders they’d placed in Kresge; unpacked a box of newly arrived books, checking them against the invoice for accuracy; and entered a book in the Library’s acquisitions module. Students also toured the Cataloging & Metadata and Preservation Departments, learning about the ‘behind-the-scenes’ work needed before a book arrives at the Library’s New Books display. A visit to the Evans Map Room rounded out the morning.

Thanks for visiting us, JSD students! We had a great time with you and you all did a great job mirroring some of our work in the Dartmouth Library. See you next year!

Richard Miller, our library colleague from Baker-Berry Access Services, is the curator of the exhibition A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America, currently on view at the American Folk Art Museum in New York City through March 8, 2015.  The show will travel nationwide over the next two years.

A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America offers a stunning presentation of American folk art made primarily in rural areas of New England, the Midwest, and the South between 1800 and 1920. More than sixty works of art, including still-life, landscape, allegorical, and portrait paintings, commercial and highly personal sculpture, and distinctive examples of art from the German-American community exemplify the breadth of American creative expression by individuals who did not always adhere to the academic models that established artistic taste in urban centers of the East Coast.”

Game Board image
GAME BOARD, Artist unidentified, American Folk Art Museum, New York City

You can read more about his exhibit in this New York Times article.

Richard has also written for the Rauner blog:  The Dartmouth Medal and A Story of Crime, Punishment and Redemption Torn from the Headlines!

His contributed essays and catalog entries include:

  • Expressions of Eloquence and Innocence: Selections from the Jane Katcher Collection of Americana Vols. I & II (Yale, 2006 and 2011)
  • Encyclopedia of New England (Yale, 2005)
  • Encyclopedia of American Folk Art (Routledge, 2004)
  • American Naïve Paintings (National Gallery of Art, 1992)

Richard has three articles forthcoming on American art and decorative arts topics. We’ll be sure to let you know when those are published.

In 1941, Budd Schulberg '36 published his first novel: What Makes Sammy Run? As a child of the studios (his father had been head of Paramount), and a frustrated screenwriter, he unleashed a torrent of criticism on Hollywood in his novel about the rise ...

In 1941, Budd Schulberg '36 published his first novel: What Makes Sammy Run? As a child of the studios (his father had been head of Paramount), and a frustrated screenwriter, he unleashed a torrent of criticism on Hollywood in his novel about the rise of Sammy Glick. The novel became a bestseller in the United States and has often been pointed to as the great American novel about Hollywood.

Schulberg knew he was taking a risk when he published the novel. It was destined to offend many of the most powerful people in Hollywood. But he did not anticipate that the novel would become fodder for the Nazi propaganda machine. Sammy Glick, the novel's offensive, back-stabbing anti-hero, was Jewish. The Nazis picked up the story and produced a translation edited to highlight the offenses of Jews in Hollywood and portray Sammy as the quintessential American Jew. Then they published it serially in the popular Berliner Illustriere Zeitung where Schulberg's words were turned against the Jewish people.

Ironically, Budd and his brother Stuart were later employed by the U.S. military to splice together film footage to be used against Nazi war criminals in Nuremberg. Their work was made particularly effective by their juxtaposition of Nazi propaganda with scenes of atrocities. For Schulberg, the appropriation of Nazi propaganda must have been a particularly sweet form of personal revenge.

To see how Sammy looked in 1942 Berlin, ask for MS-978, Box 6, Folder 4. And, as a reminder, our current exhibition, Budd Schulberg and the Scripting of Social Change, runs through January 30, 2015 in the Class of 1965 Galleries. And, for more on Schulberg, see these postings from August 9, 2011 and November 4, 2014.