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Gear Up is a great opportunity to explore services and tools, and speak with people available on campus who can support your research endeavors. At the “Impact of Your Work” table, we explore different tools that show the impact of your work/research. Journal articles are the traditional form of publication, but it is only one […]
ImpactPoster

Click here for suggested tools

Gear Up is a great opportunity to explore services and tools, and speak with people available on campus who can support your research endeavors. At the “Impact of Your Work” table, we explore different tools that show the impact of your work/research. Journal articles are the traditional form of publication, but it is only one way to disseminate work. The graphic (right) shows an array of possibilities.

Publication citation is only one way to measure impact. Most people have heard of the h-index, which is the number of papers, h, that have been cited at least h times. You can find your h-index through Web of Science or Google Scholar Citations.

  • In Web of Science, the most accurate way to generate a citation report is to do an “Author Search” and follow the prompts that are meant to find the right author (by field and by affiliation). In addition to h-index, the citation report shows your publication count by year and the number of citations received by year.
  • Google Scholar Citations is another place to find the h-index. You do need to sign up and create a profile (which can be public or private). It can be set up to automatically or manually populate with your publications. The metrics are immediately updated. Check out Prof. David Kotz’s profile as an example!

Some researchers have very common last names and first (and middle) initials so it is difficult to pinpoint their work exactly. Hence, we recommend all researchers sign up for an ORCID identifier, which is similar to having a Social Security Number. Many publishers and funding agencies are now including this as a field in submissions. No matter what variation of your name gets used, as long as it’s associated with this ID, you’ll get credit!

To raise your impact, you have to broaden your reach. One way is to make your work as openly available as possible. For example, you can choose to archive on your website, deposit in a repository, or publish open access.

  • Sherpa ROMEO allows you to search for your publisher’s copyright and self-archiving policies. It’s easy to figure out if you can use the publisher’s final version on your website!
  • The Registry of Open Access Repositories is a listing of world-wide repositories. Dartmouth does not (yet) have an institutional repository (see Carole Meyers if you’d like to learn more).
  • If you’re considering publishing open access, talk to us (namely, Barbara DeFelice)! Dartmouth supports the publication fees for open access journals that qualify under the Compact for Open Access Publishing Equity (COPE).

You can also disseminate your work in many different forms, including figures, graphics, presentations, datasets, code, etc. There are several sites that help facilitate this: figshare, slideshare, github, Dryad, YouTube, etc. This results in new ways of measuring impact and redefining what that means.

  • Altmetrics.org tries to keep track of the most recent tools to have arisen.
  • ImpactStory aggregates impact data from a variety of sources and shows impact of a variety of different forms of dissemination. See a sample profile here.
  • Research Gate is a tool that is growing in popularity here at Dartmouth. I spent some time looking into this and have written up a separate blog post about it. It also has its own metric called an “RG score.”
  • We also have an extensive listing of tools on our Scholarly Publishing & Communication guide.

The scholarly communications landscape is constantly changing and keeping up with trends can be a challenge, but we are here to help! Contact your favorite librarian anytime.

Additional Readings

When people ask me what aspect of math I studied as a math major, I like to say the intersection of math and art. Although I haven’t studied the mathematical aspects in depth, I love origami and have been folding on and off for the last 15 years. Recently, I’ve been folding lucky stars (see […]

When people ask me what aspect of math I studied as a math major, I like to say the intersection of math and art. Although I haven’t studied the mathematical aspects in depth, I love origami and have been folding on and off for the last 15 years. Recently, I’ve been folding lucky stars (see my other post for more pictures), but I want to go back to working on modular origami soon.

Plus magazine published a really interesting article on “the power of origami.” The author talks about the impact origami has made in science and technology and touches on the basics of the math behind it. Big names in origami-math include Robert J. Lang and Thomas Hull. Come check out some of the books we have at the Library!


Between the Folds
Jones Media Center #9820

Origami Tessellations
Cook TT870 .G49 2009

Ornamental Origami
Cook TT870 .M822 2009

Marvelous Modular Origami
Cook TT870 .M82 2007


Project Origami
Cook QA19 .P34 H85 2013


Origami Design Secrets
Sherman TT870 .L2614 2003

How to Fold It
Cook QA564 .O76 2011

Geometric Folding Algorithms
Cook QA491 .D46 2007

Origami, Japanese paper folding
Book Arts Ref TT870 .O75 1959

And go see the “book” Fun Origami at Rauner.

I couldn’t resist sharing this discovery with you: Numberphile! There are over a hundred videos featuring numbers! Review from the Scout Report (volume 19, number 44): http://www.youtube.com/numberphile Are you a numberphile? Maybe you are and you don’t know it yet. If you have any interest in topology, geometry, algebra, or other facets of math, this […]

I couldn’t resist sharing this discovery with you: Numberphile! There are over a hundred videos featuring numbers!

screenshot of the website

Review from the Scout Report (volume 19, number 44):

http://www.youtube.com/numberphile
Are you a numberphile? Maybe you are and you don’t know it yet. If you have any interest in topology, geometry, algebra, or other facets of math, this website may be right up your alley. Created by Brady Haran, the site contains hundreds of entertaining videos, including titles like “Unboxing Calculators,” “Politics and Numbers,” and the very engaging “Pi and the Size of the Universe.” Visitors can search the entire collection as they see fit, read comments by other users and also even view topical themes, such as Prime Numbers and Yahtzee. Additionally, there is a Discussion area where visitors can engage in dialogue with other scholars and folks with an interest in mathematics education.

Yesterday, I attended the Math Department’s colloquium, featuring a talk by Yitang “Tom” Zhang (UNH) titled “Bounded gaps between primes.” Zhang has been all over the news for making a breakthrough in a centuries old problem (the twin prime conjecture).

  • Read the press release from the University of New Hampshire.
  • The paper will be published in the Annals of Mathematics. You can read a version of it here now.
  • And of course, Numberphile has a video explaining the significance of this result:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=vkMXdShDdtY

This is a quarterly electronic newsletter to update you on what’s happening in your Library! Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have questions or suggestions! Click here to read the Fall 2013 newsletter! Past Newsletters: Spring 2013 Summer 2013 Filed under: Astronomy, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Kresge, Math, Physics

This is a quarterly electronic newsletter to update you on what’s happening in your Library! Please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have questions or suggestions!

Click here to read the Fall 2013 newsletter!

Past Newsletters:

February marks the birthday of Charles Darwin, the father of evolutionary biology. Charles Darwin once wrote about his studies in the mathematics, “I have deeply regretted that I did not proceed far enough at least to understand something of the great leading principles of mathematics; for men thus endowed seem to have an extra sense.”Charles Darwin, 1876 [...]

February marks the birthday of Charles Darwin, the father of evolutionary biology. Charles Darwin once wrote about his studies in the mathematics, “I have deeply regretted that I did not proceed far enough at least to understand something of the great leading principles of mathematics; for men thus endowed seem to have an extra sense.”Charles Darwin, 1876

This new documentary by Professor Dan Rockmore, Wendy Conquest, and Bob Drake explores how twenty-first century mathematics is bringing an extra sense to the study of biology.

Darwin's Extra Sense

View the complete film  at the Sante Fe Institute, Darwin’s Extra Sense or the Dartmouth Department of Mathematics website.

You may have seen the Dartmouth Now coverage of the article Making Math Pop in a recent issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education by mathematician and department chair, Dan Rockmore. Dan’s review of expository mathematical writings, old and new, is captivating from the first line, “You never forget your first love. I’m staring at her right now: a well-thumbed [...]

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You may have seen the Dartmouth Now coverage of the article Making Math Pop in a recent issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education by mathematician and department chair, Dan Rockmore. Dan’s review of expository mathematical writings, old and new, is captivating from the first line, “You never forget your first love. I’m staring at her right now: a well-thumbed copy of E.T. Bell’s Men of Mathematics.”

Dan’s Chronicle article highlights colorful stories and histories behind the mathematics many of us have come to enjoy, and the mathematics we use everyday, perhaps without even knowing it. We have many classic and new books in our collection about math and mathematicians from histories to recreations.

The following is a sampling of books mentioned in in Making Math Pop, or links to other titles and authors from our collection that have proved inspiring to many readers young and old.

These titles are both popular and non-popular mathematical works including the highlight of Dan’s article,  The joy of X : a guided tour of math, from one to infinity and Steven Strogatz on the Elements of Math New York Times math column.

Mathematics for the Million by Lancelot Thomas Hogben

Martin Gardner

Ian Stewart

And for a recent and colorful narrative on the personalities behind some mathematicians or enduring theorems, you may enjoy A Strange Wilderness: The Lives of the Great Mathematicians

We may all be going on holiday break, but if you are like me, learning does not stop. This new list of TED math talks are both educational and fun to watch. You needn’t be a mathematician to enjoy them, really :-) Supplemented here are a handful of books from our library collection or other [...]

We may all be going on holiday break, but if you are like me, learning does not stop. This new list of TED math talks are both educational and fun to watch. You needn’t be a mathematician to enjoy them, really 🙂

Supplemented here are a handful of books from our library collection or other content that is written by the video presenters.

Ron Eglash
African fractals : modern computing and indigenous design
Baker Berry GN650 .E35 1999

Appropriating technology : vernacular science and social power
Feldberg T14.5 .A68 2004

More about Dennis Wildfogel and his video How big is infinity?

Margaret Wertheim
The pearly gates of cyberspace : a history of space from Dante to the Internet
Baker Berry Cook QA76.9.C66 W48 1999

Physics on the fringe : smoke rings, circlons, and alternative theories of everything
Kresge QC20 .W46 2011

Pythagoras’ trousers : God, physics, and the gender wars
Kresge QC19.6 .W47 1995

Mandelbrot – Way too many library books to list
http://bit.ly/T9TRik

And for something to read and most of the libraries are closed, check out Kresge’s popular science collection of books on the shelf or browse it online.