Skip to content

A round-up of sites describing useful and popular chemistry apps for mobile devices: Mobile Science lists a range of popular apps in chemistry and other disciplines (physics, biology, math) with brief descriptions and up- and down-votes. The SciMobileApps wiki has an extensive list of chemistry apps, as well as other disciplines.   Check out The […]
MobileApps

Image used under a CC BY-SA Creative Commons license

A round-up of sites describing useful and popular chemistry apps for mobile devices:

goldstar2Mobile Science lists a range of popular apps in chemistry and other disciplines (physics, biology, math) with brief descriptions and up- and down-votes.

goldstar2The SciMobileApps wiki has an extensive list of chemistry apps, as well as other disciplines.

goldstar2  Check out The Mobile Chemist & Chemical Engineer from Stanford’s Swain Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Library.   Arranged by category including Formulas, Structures, Reactions; Journals, Magazines, News; Structure Drawing; 3D Visualization; Calculating & Graphing  and so on.

Don’t forget Browzine!   goldstar2Licensed by the Library, Browzine delivers the most recent issue of thousands of academic journals to your iPad or Android tablet.   Select journals you follow and arrange them on a ‘bookshelf’ so they’re always at your fingertips.  Save citations and pdfs to Zotero, MendeleyDropbox and other services for offline reading.   (Follow setup instructions to configure Browzine to recognize your Dartmouth journal access.)

 

Further reading:

Filed under: Chemistry, Science, Tech Tips

Article by Rick Hansen In a December “App Smart” section of The New York Times, columnist Kit Eaton remembers when we were promised paperless lives with amplified Internet accessibility, and most recently, increased mobile technology.  Freedom from the paper trail has not yet arrived, but Eaton’s review of free and for-purchase mobile applications will help […]

Article by Rick Hansen

In a December “App Smart” section of The New York Times, columnist Kit Eaton remembers when we were promised paperless lives with amplified Internet accessibility, and most recently, increased mobile technology.  Freedom from the paper trail has not yet arrived, but Eaton’s review of free and for-purchase mobile applications will help you manage documents and reduce the need to carry around and save physical items.  Click here to read more on the pros and cons of iOS applications such as Readdle’s Scanner Pro, Genius Scan, Perfect OCR, or the Android application Mobile Doc Scanner.

Application Highlights:

Genius Scan

genius-scanUsing your camera on your mobile device, take a picture and store it directly into Genius Scan or utilize your camera’s stored images to import saved pictures.  Genius Scan creates a new PDF file every time an image is uploaded. It also allows you to add to existing documents for multi-page PDFs and helpful organization.

 

You can also export files as a PDF or JPG through email or iAnnotate (for example).  The bonus Wi-Fi-sync option with a nearby computer is available if you like, and you also have the ability to adjust the resolution of an image.  The free version (Genius Scan “Lite”) has sync limitations with Dropbox, Evernote and other cloud storage providers.

Automatic and manual cropping allows you to make the best of your captured image:

genius-scan-screen

Genius Fax

Genius Fax works directly with Genius Scan to allow for faxing a document, when sharing a PDF is not an option. Genius Fax also makes available a cover page when faxing a file, if desired.  Payment in advance is required for each file, prior to sending the fax.

Here is an example of stored fax transactions, and a welcome homepage:

genius-fax
The application’s mobile cover page allows for straightforward fax submission:

genius-fax-screen

Start Lite

Start Lite allows you to create a PDF from a webpage.  The application will become your web browser for quick “PDFMe” options. Alternatively (and after download), you may enter the letter “S” to the beginning of your Safari webpage and the Start Lite PDF option will automatically begin.  Your PDFs are stored for quick access offline, and with this lite app version, 3 free PDFs can be created everyday.

Below:  See how you may use multiple tabs for browsing and you can use menu bars to toggle between views.

start-lite

A summary of open webpages appears on the left-menu column.  Swipe the screen to open or close this menu.  Selecting “new tab” opens a new webpage.  Also, view your stored PDF files by selecting “My PDF Files.”

By selecting “My PDF Files,” the right column lists all of your saved PDFs:

start-lite-screen
Swiping between the three menu pages allows you to see open tabs and webpages (to the far left), stored documents (in the center), and an open document or webpage (on the right):

start-lite-screen2

UpToDate is now available for your IOS, Android, or Windows 8 mobile device. To take advantage of this new feature, you must register for a personal account.  Go to UpToDate while on a computer (not your mobile device) connected to the DH or Dartmouth network. Click on the red “Log In/Register” button on UpToDate’s home page:   […]

UpToDate is now available for your IOS, Android, or Windows 8 mobile device.

To take advantage of this new feature, you must register for a personal account.  Go to UpToDate while on a computer (not your mobile device) connected to the DH or Dartmouth network. Click on the red “Log In/Register” button on UpToDate’s home page:

uptodate-mobile

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fill out the registration form for new users and submit. You’ll quickly receive a confirmation by email.

Go to the app store for your device and download the free UpToDate app. Log in with your newly created user name and password. You can have the app on up to 2 devices; your laptop or desktop computer does not count as a device. Please note: you must be connected to the internet via your device to access the content.

Your registration expires if you do not log in every 30 days from either your device or computer on the Dartmouth or DH network. You’ll get a reminder after 25 days of not logging in.

UpToDate is brought to you by a partnership of the Dartmouth Biomedical Libraries, Geisel School of Medicine, and Dartmouth-Hitchcock.

Questions?  Contact Biomedical.Libraries.Reference@Dartmouth.edu or 650-7660.