Skip to content

Books by Dartmouth Authors for the Summer display in KAFWhat are you reading this summer?  Need a suggestion? How about a portrait of Vietnam War soldiers, an exploration of fly-fishing and physics, or an account of labor conditions of low-wage workers worldwide?  A study of a 50-year research project in a New Hampshire forest, a history of the Hebrew language, or a guide to help conquer your migraines, once and for all?  The Summer 2018 display of New Books by Dartmouth Authors is now up in the King Arthur Flour Café, showcasing a fascinating array of research and scholarship from members of the Dartmouth community.

Want more?  Check out “Holding Court,” a series of short interviews with the authors, appearing Mondays throughout the term.  And I hope you can come to this summer’s book talk, on July 18 at 4:30 PM in the East Reading Room of Baker-Berry, with Marcelo Gleiser, professor of physics and astronomy at Dartmouth.  Author of The Simple Beauty of the Unexpected: A Natural Philosopher's Quest for Trout and the Meaning of Everything, Gleiser’s lyrical prose explores the physics – and bigger philosophical questions – pertaining to fly-fishing, a hobby he picked up after watching a class on the Dartmouth Green.

Next time you’re in line at the KAF (which, by the way, reopens on June 21), take a look at this summer’s selection.  The Dartmouth Library has a copy of each one of these books for check-out, or, look for them in a library or bookstore near you:

 

Mark Bray History Professor
Mark Bray

Holding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

In this week's edition, we talk with Mark Bray, who teaches History.  Bray's book, Antifa: the anti-fascist handbook (Melville House, 2017) gained national attention immediately following its publication in August 2017.  After the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville, VA, which resulted in the death of counter-protestor Heather Heyer, Antifa's publisher, Melville House, rushed to print Antifa in order to provide historical context for the anti-fascist movement.  Most academic titles see an initial printing of a few hundred copies; Melville House set a first printing of 10,000, with an additional print-run of 20,000 copies, as reported by the Guardian.  Bray is an authority on the movement, one who participates in it (Bray was an organizer of Occupy Wall Street) and also performs deft political analysis of its place in current politics and over the last century.

What is your book about?

A century of anti-fascist resistance in Europe and North America; or, how to make friends at an Ivy League institution.

Where do you get your ideas?

From Bakunin's ghost.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

Meeting people on marches. Reading old documents in archives. Interviewing revolutionaries. Having drinks at squatted social centers.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

A free, global database of information.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Stay hydrated.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

The Sports section.

photo of douglas irwinHolding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

In this week's edition, we talk with Douglas Irwin, the John French Professor of Economics.  Irwin, an expert on trade history, recently published Clashing over Commerce: A History of U.S. Trade Policy (University of Chicago Press, 2017).  The book has already received an enthusiastic reception from the media and academic peers, particularly in this era of intensifying debate around steel tariffs and other trade policies.  In spite of a busy schedule of media appearances, research, and teaching, Irwin made time to speak with the Library about his book.  And what he likes reading!

What is your book about?

The history of US trade policy from the very beginning (1763 or so) up to now.

Where do you get your ideas?

Often by thinking about the work of others.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

Could not work at all without the resources of the Baker-Berry Library!

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

No idea, but I hope it always remains a place for discovering things and meeting people.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Persistence: the key to writing is rewriting, and if you do a little every day it adds up over time.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

Aside from obscure and boring economics books, usually history, or instead of that...more history!  I just checked out The Year without Summer about a volcano eruption in 1816 that darkened and cooled the globe for a year and cause big crop problems in America, leading to food shortages and hard times. A great case of the environment affecting the economy.

Images of Food Across Borders book cover and co-editor Matt GarciaHolding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

In this week's edition, we talk with Matt Garcia, Professor of Latin American, Latino/a & Caribbean Studies and History.  He is a co-editor, along with E. Melanie Dupuis and Don Mitchell, of Food Across Borders (Rutgers, 2017).  Their introduction sets the stage for a diverse group of essays, exploring how "the way we produce food, the way we eat, and what we eat have frequently hinged on the flow of people, foods, memories, and worldviews across borders."  On Thursday, April 26 at 4:30 PM in the East Reading Room of Baker-Berry Library, the Dartmouth Library will host a book talk featuring Food Across Borders, with co-editors Garcia and Dupuis and contributor Teresa Mares presenting the volume.   The event is free and open to the public, and promises to be a fascinating look into the intersections of military and/or labor history, trade policy, immigration, and digestion.  And yes, food will be served.

What is your book about?

We seek to overcome generalizations about the ills of a globalized food system and the uncritical valorization of local producers to understand the history and possible futures for food production in a modern world.

Where do you get your ideas?

All three editors have been working at the crossroads of food and labor or food and digestion. We began to see that all of our approaches involved border crossings: either immigrants or food stuff moving over borders and bodies of water, or food breaching the barriers that separate the outside of our bodies from within. We thought others might be working on these same issues. This volume proves that our hunch was right.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

For this book, research required an appreciation of taste as a form of evidence. The unique flavors that constitute a cuisine also provide hidden clues to our pasts and recent transformations in our trade regimes.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

It is fitting that the King Arthur Café resides in Baker-Berry Library, and our book is on display there! We believe that libraries will incorporate a more complete sensory experience. I recall using the music and video libraries at UC Berkeley as an undergraduate. I think we ought to imagine how tastes and smells can be catalogued and displayed. It may not be appropriate for every campus library, but one or some should consider catering to senses other than sight and touch.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Never hesitate to transgress boundaries. We radically transgress disciplinary boundaries in this book, which includes considering evidence (taste) that traditional approaches to scholarship might dismiss.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

I am currently reading books about how to farm. We own a 12.8 acre farmstead in Thetford, Vermont, and I intend to return cows to the land this spring. My favorite book in this genre is The Independent Farmstead by Beth Dougherty.

 

Professor Katie HornsteinHolding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

In this week's edition, we talk with Katie Hornstein, a specialist of nineteenth-century French art and visual culture.  Her book, Picturing War in France, 1792–1856 (Yale University Press, 2018), examines representations of contemporary conflict in the first half of the 19th century and how these pictures provided citizens with an imaginative stake in wars being waged in their name.  Katie also recently co-edited Horace Vernet and the Thresholds of Nineteenth-Century Visual Culture (University Press of New England, 2017) about the artist Horace Vernet, who, although popular during his lifetime, was reviled by the poet Charles Baudelaire and thus consigned to relative obscurity.  In this interview, Katie speaks about her single-authored monograph, Picturing War.

What is your book about?

My book deals with the emergence of a public in France after the French Revolution that was eager to consume pictures of war: these pictures were (relatively) easy to understand and often fun to look at, though they were also violent. I want to know what this tells us about the political and artistic culture of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. 

Where do you get your ideas?

From my cat. And from primary sources, especially works of art.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

For research, I could not live without Gallica (the digital portal of the Bibliothèque nationale de France), museums, curators, and my colleagues.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

I hope that it will still contain a lot of books. The digital world is wonderful, but I think it's important to know how to browse the shelves and be surprised by what you find.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Put down your phone and make space for non-distracted thinking.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

I just read Goodbye Vitamin by Rachel Khong and some salacious French revolutionary historical fiction by Hilary Mantel (A Place of Greater Safety); at the moment, I'm contending with a pile of old New Yorker magazines that have gone neglected in recent months.

cover of bookHolding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

In this week's edition, we talk with four of the student authors of Bartolomeo Platina: Lives of the Popes, Paul II (Faenum Publishing, 2017).  During the Spring 2016 term, Professor Thomas Hendrickson created an experiential learning opportunity by assigning Latin 28 students the task of producing an edition of a Renaissance Latin text. The manuscript was completed during the ten-week term, and was published last fall.  The edition has 11 co-authors, including current students and alumni/ae, proving that Dartmouth undergraduates are no strangers to high quality research and scholarship.  The Classics department is sponsoring a launch party for the book on Friday, April 13 from 4:30-6 PM in Bartlett 201.  Students, alumni, faculty and friends are welcome to attend.

What is your book about?

Graham Rigby (GR): The text concerns Pope Paul II's imprisonment and torture of humanists during the early part of the renaissance in Rome.  Daniel Gridley (DG): The winners write the history books, so Bartolomeo Platina took the liberty of writing the book on his arch nemesis, Pope Paul II.  Gaby Sommer (GS): We put together the first student edition of Platina’s Paul II, including grammatical, lexical, philological and historical commentary.

Where do you get your ideas?

GS: I've always been interested in finding ways to get young people excited about Latin -- to make it fun. Professor Hendrickson pitched this project as an opportunity to do just that. Learning Latin in high school, particularly with the AP curriculum, it was easy to get bogged down in grammar and "Gaul is divided into three parts" and forget the significance of the literature you’re reading. Sometimes you need a breath of fresh air. Lives of the Popes is a ready-made soap opera. It’s the Renaissance Game of Thrones. Our job was just to make it accessible.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

Kent Ueno (KU): I have the image of papers strewn everywhere. After all, research is a collaborative process and one needs to constantly be in conversation with the community. I wouldn't be able to live without different colored pens.  DG: Collaboration--the ability to bounce ideas and drafts off of colleagues.  GR: Research is being curled up with a book. Cozy chairs are a necessity.  GS: KAF!

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

GS: I hope we never outgrow traditional libraries, but I expect more Kindle-types, more digitization – maybe a library cloud?  KU: I think it's rather sadly becoming more digital. I like physical books though, and hope it can stay that way. I imagine it will be largely digital with sections off in the corner for the oldies who like books.  GR: Hopefully much the same as the library of today.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

KU: Find something you're actually interested in. You'll put out your best work when you really care.  DG: Write! The more you write, the more you write. Like anything, it takes practice to find your own voice.  GS: I’m still in college, so I'm speaking from limited experience, but I think a combination of good mentorship, patience, and choosing work you genuinely enjoy at the end of the day goes a long way.  GR: Don't worry about deadlines.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

DG: I'm currently reading Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch, and next on my docket is Italo Calvino's The Nonexistent Knight.  KU: I'll read anything from the Lord of the Rings to the Hannibal Lecter series. I'd like to get more into books by authors like Brian Greene who explain complex physics ideas so clearly to general audiences. It's an extremely difficult skill I want to master.  GS: I read a lot of fiction – I really love John Irving, and he’s written so much that you can read him for a while. I’m also a big fan of essays when I’m short on time – Charles D’Ambrosio, Amy Schumer, Joan Didion and David Foster Wallace are my go-tos.  GR: These days I read a lot of ancient history - I'm currently (slowly) reading a book about the collapse of Eastern Mediterranean societies at the end of the late bronze age. If I had more time, I'd be reading Duff McKagan's It's So Easy: and Other Lies, a harrowing tale of his time as a member of Guns N' Roses and his long battle with drug and alcohol addiction.

Photo of Rashauna Johnson, professor of history and AAASHolding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

In this week's edition, we talk with Rashauna Johnson, Associate Professor of History, and author of Slavery's Metropolis: Unfree Labor in New Orleans during the Age of Revolutions (Cambridge University Press, 2016; paperback 2018). Rashauna's book has received much acclaim, garnering the 2016 Williams Prize for the best book in Louisiana history and an honorable mention for the Urban History Association's Kenneth Jackson Award.  Slavery's Metropolis was also a finalist for the 2016 Berkshire Conference of Women's Historians Book Prize, and the 2017 Frederick Douglass Book Prize.

What is your book about?

It shows how fights over the physical place of enslaved people in New Orleans were proxies for Atlantic debates about urbanity, mobility and modernity.

Where do you get your ideas?

Archival research, other scholars, and popular culture.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

Good music and great coffee.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

Beats me. I just hope it exists!

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

To pay attention to the craft of writing, and to remember that inspiration and discipline feed one another.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

Fiction. I love novels.  I haven’t started it, but next up is Brit Bennett’s The Mothers.

Photo of Sara Muñoz
Sara Muñoz-Muriana, Department of Spanish & Portuguese

Holding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library. 

In this week's edition, we talk with Sara Muñoz-Muriana, Assistant Professor of Spanish, and author of "Andando se hace el camino" : calle y subjetividades marginales en la España del siglo XIX.  Madrid: Iberoamericana, 2017.  Sara specializes in 19th century literature from Spain, and teaches classes teaches classes on the literature and culture of Spain from the 18th and 19th centuries.

What is your book about?

My book studies the street in connection with a number of marginal figures --prostitutes, beggars, female shoppers, ragpickers, the unemployed or adulterers--that populate the Spanish literary productions of the 19th century.

Where do you get your ideas?

Everywhere! Reading the newspaper, watching TV, or listening to the Spanish news, I couldn't help but establish connections between the great political and economic unrest in Spain today and the 19th-century characters in my literary works. And I have to say, my ideas take shape and become organized when I am outside running, an activity that I've been doing regularly and that has kept me sane!

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

For me, research doesn't always happen when we are busy in front of the computer. That's why I try to get away from the computer as much as possible, and sit down and read novels as people would have read them in the 19th century. Trying to recreate the reading and living experience of the time when these works were published is an essential part of my research.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

Honestly, I hope the library of the future looks very much like the library of today: a nice combination of physical materials and electronic resources. Baker-Berry does an awesome job in giving us access to online materials as well as materials from other libraries that are not here. As much as I like physical books, it would be great if in the future we could have immediate access to books that are not in Baker. The dream of any scholar would be to access any material with the touch of a button --in other words, if everything would be digitalized!

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Do something you are really interested in!

And finally, what do you read for fun?

I have recently discovered Scandinavian crime fiction, and precisely because it is so different to what I do as a scholar, it is something that I like to read to relax and have fun!

books by Dartmouth authors for the spring 2018 displaySpring is here!  And with it a new line-up of books by Dartmouth authors in the King Arthur Flour Café.  Next time you are in Baker-Berry, check out the newly redesigned display, which offers a powerful visual “read” on Dartmouth’s intellectual talent.  Its location in the King Arthur Flour Café is no accident; the Library serves as an incubator for much of the research and writing activities of Dartmouth authors, providing necessary services, staff expertise, and spaces for work.

The Spring 2018 cohort of ten authors includes both faculty and students, in the humanities and social sciences, and includes single-authored monographs, edited volumes, a translation, and an edition of Renaissance Latin text.  One new feature of the display is a series of interviews with the authors, editors, and translators, to be published throughout the term right here on Library Muse.  The Library will also be hosting a book talk each term featuring one of the books on display.  On Thursday, April 26 at 4:30 PM, in the East Reading Room, we will have Matt Garcia, co-editor of Food Across Borders (Rutgers, 2017) in dialogue with co-editor E. Melanie Dupuis and contributor Teresa Mares.

These books are now part of the Library's collections and are available for check out.  For more information, click on any of the links (below) or check out this guide to new books by Dartmouth authors:

1

Keeping you up to date with Library teaching and outreach activities.

House Librarians
by Laura Barrett, Director of Education & Outreach

Founders Day -- School House
A student signs the School House book during Founders Day in Baker-Berry Library.

On February 26, Dartmouth's new housing communities were launched! All current non-graduating students were invited to Founders Day at Baker-Berry Library where they learned their house affiliations, met their house professors, signed the house founders books, and received house scarves and t-shirts. The Library's role in the new house system runs deeper than being the happy hosts to Founders Day, though. Each of the house communities has its own house librarian. The house librarians will be active members of the house communities and will partner with house professors to enrich the intellectual engagement of the communities.

House Librarians
House Librarians, from L to R: Andi Bartelstein (South House), Ridie Ghezzi (McLaughlin Cluster), Laura Barrett (West House), Jill Baron (East Wheelock House), Katie Harding (School House), Pamela Bagley (North Park House), Caitlin Birch (Allen House)

Biomedical Writer's Retreat
by Heather Johnson, Research and Education Librarian

Matthews-Fuller Health Sciences Library
Matthews-Fuller Health Sciences Library

The Biomedical Libraries held its first Biomedical Writer's Retreat January 29-30, 2016. The purpose of the retreat was to support researchers in the process of manuscript preparation; the retreat organizers provided access to writing support, research assistance, and a quiet space to facilitate the writing process. To help participants develop their writing skills, the retreat was structured to balance protected writing time and programming. The program included time with a writing specialist who met individually with each participant to give feedback on a sample from their draft manuscript and to discuss steps to improve logic, clarity, and the writing process. The Biomedical librarians also met with each participant to discuss best practices for literature searching, strategies to increase article and personal research impact, and things to consider when selecting a journal for manuscript submission. Participants also attended three seminars, one of which was led Jen Green and Barbara DeFelice from the Library's Scholarly Communication, Publishing and Copyright program. A full description of the event and the agenda are available online.

Participants provided positive feedback on all aspects of the retreat, and provided suggestions to improve future iterations of the retreat. The Biomedical Libraries hope to offer a second retreat this summer.

30 Tools for 30 Days
by Katie Harding, Physical Sciences Librarian
30tools30days During winter term, librarians in the Kresge Physical Sciences Library used their blog to share ideas with the Dartmouth community about some exciting tools in scholarly communication. 30 tools for 30 days is a series of blog posts about 30 innovative websites, programs, and apps designed to assist researchers in each of six phases of the research cycle – discovery, analysis, writing, publication, outreach, and assessment.

Kresge librarians Katie Harding, Lora Leligdon, and Jane Quigley identified tools that would be of interest at Dartmouth, and each day posted a synopsis of a new tool. Inspiration for the blog series came from the poster 101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication: The Changing Research Workflow by Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer at Utrecht University. The 30 tools for 30 days posts can be found on the Kresge Physical Sciences Library and Cook Mathematics Collection blog.

DartmouthX: Creation
by Memory Apata, Music Library Specialist

The American Renaissance team on site in Salem, MA.
The American Renaissance team on site in Salem, MA.

The American Renaissance: Classic Literature of the 19th Century, a massive open online course (MOOC) by DartmouthX, opened for students around the world February 16th, 2016. The course is being taught by Professors Jed Dobson and Donald Pease, who also taught a residential version of the course by the same name in the Winter 2016 term. The course explores seven authors from the antebellum period: Ralph Waldo Emerson, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Walt Whitman, Mark Twain, Herman Melville, and Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Substantial contributions from Library staff were key components in the development of the MOOC. As the subject specialist for English, Laura Braunstein was a member of the course team from the beginning, consulting on course development, reading selection, and learning goals. Barbara DeFelice, Director of Digital Resources and Scholarly Communication, consulted on rights for secondary reading materials, including essays by the professors. Jay Satterfield, Head of Rauner Special Collections Library, presented in a video titled, "The Plurality of the Whale," in which he examines different editions of Moby Dick to discuss how the physical manifestation of a text affects the student's reading of that text. For example, if a book is marketed as a classic, the student often recognizes the book as such and disregards any moments of misunderstanding as a fault of their own rather than a fault of the text. You can read more about the fall 2015 exhibit on the various and diverse editions of Moby Dick in Rauner's collections. Memory Apata, Music Library Specialist, is the lead teaching assistant for the MOOC and curated an exhibit in the Paddock Music Library called "Music and the Writers of the American Renaissance." The exhibit runs through April 9th and showcases scores, books, recordings, and video of music inspired by the authors being read in the course.

Baker Tower