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Photo of Sadhana Warty Hall
Photo of Sadhana Warty Hall

In this week's edition, we speak with Sadhana Warty Hall, Deputy Director of the Rockefeller Center who oversees programs focusing on leadership, public policy and civil engagement. She's even gone as far as to co-author the book Teaching Leadership: Bridging Theory and Practice which strives to several aspects of teaching leadership and why it is important.

What is your book about?

This book illustrates how leadership can be taught and I recommend it for sceptics and believers. It shows how to bridge theory and practice in higher education settings. I am also learning that the content can be adapted, adopted, and adjusted for high school settings, for-profit, not-for-profit, and government institutions as well. Exciting. Leadership CAN be taught.

Where did you get your ideas for this book?

The idea for this book is best summarized from an account from the book. The idea grew from a conversation Alan Sturmer Executive Editor, Edward Elgar Publishing Inc., had with Joanne Ciulla, professor emerita, Jepson School of Leadership Studies, University of Richmond. She who edits EE’s leadership series. Sturmer was looking to do a volume on Teaching Leadership. Ciulla suggested contacting my Gama Perruci, who asked whether I would co-author the book with him.

Ideas in this book are completely based on our experience related to teaching leadership in curricular and the co-curricular settings. It bridges theory with practice, it shares the idea of continuos quality improvement, and broader learning from concepts related to leadership education, training, and development.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

A quiet space, a fast laptop, and a process that helps to capture themes supporting an idea germinating in my mind.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

Ability to read books online! Ability to gather as a learning community in a dedicated physical and online space.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

Start with writing your key ideas down. Organize them. Look at gaps. See what research says about the ideas. If you are given a deadline and you think it is doable, I think you should double or triple the time you think it will take you to complete your project. Choose a co-author carefully. I was very lucky but I have heard it is hard to work on co-authored projects often.

And finally, what do you read for fun? Or, what would you be reading if you had more time?

I would be reading biographies and autobiographies of presidents and prime-ministers if I had more time. It is interesting to learn about the thought processes behind incidents have taken place.

Wheelan photoHolding Court is an interview series that features the authors of the new books on display in the King Arthur Flour café in Baker-Berry Library.

To kick off the fall term, we hear from economist Charles "Charlie" Wheelan, Class of 1988, Senior Lecturer and Policy Fellow at the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy.  Wheelan, former correspondent for The Economistis the author of the "Naked" series: Naked Economics (W.W. Norton, 2002), Naked Statistics (W.W. Norton, 2013), and the latest, Naked Money (W.W. Norton, 2016).  What advice does the prolific writer offer those who get stuck?  To power through the early drafts.

What is your book about?

It describes what "money" is and why it matters. In the process, I try to explain the broader global financial system.

Where did you get your ideas for this book?

Money is such a strange phenomenon. (That $100 bill in your wallet is just a piece of paper.) Yet finance has a huge impact on all of our lives, as we learned during the 2007/2008 financial crisis. I wanted to explore and demystify all this.

What does research look like for you? What element of research could you not live without?

Most of my work is applied. I take other people's ideas and make them more accessible. I'm also the founder of Unite America, which is an effort to re-empower the political middle by electing independents.

What do you think the library of the future will look like?

I'm hoping that libraries will always be physical spaces, as well as repositories of information. They should be a place where we share important community resources, whether that is computer terminals or just good air-conditioning when it's really hot outside.

What advice would you give to an aspiring scholar or writer?

The first draft is always awful. Just power through.

And finally, what do you read for fun?

I've always made time to read for fun, ever since I was a Dartmouth undergrad. I once read War and Peace while hitchhiking in New Zealand. I currently alternate between fiction and nonfiction.