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February marks the birthday of Charles Darwin, the father of evolutionary biology. Charles Darwin once wrote about his studies in the mathematics, “I have deeply regretted that I did not proceed far enough at least to understand something of the great leading principles of mathematics; for men thus endowed seem to have an extra sense.”Charles Darwin, 1876 [...]

February marks the birthday of Charles Darwin, the father of evolutionary biology. Charles Darwin once wrote about his studies in the mathematics, “I have deeply regretted that I did not proceed far enough at least to understand something of the great leading principles of mathematics; for men thus endowed seem to have an extra sense.”Charles Darwin, 1876

This new documentary by Professor Dan Rockmore, Wendy Conquest, and Bob Drake explores how twenty-first century mathematics is bringing an extra sense to the study of biology.

Darwin's Extra Sense

View the complete film  at the Sante Fe Institute, Darwin’s Extra Sense or the Dartmouth Department of Mathematics website.

Instant gratification for geoscientists! The Société Géologique de France (SGF) has added articles and metadata for the Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, back to 1985. The Seismological Society of America (SSA) has completed its release of Earthquake Notes, which were later published as Seismological Research Letters. GeoScienceWorld now contains all archival content for [...]

Instant gratification for geoscientists!Image

The Société Géologique de France (SGF) has added articles and metadata for the Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France, back to 1985. The Seismological Society of America (SSA) has completed its release of Earthquake Notes, which were later published as Seismological Research Letters. GeoScienceWorld now contains all archival content for these publications from 1929 to present.

GeoScienceWorld is a core collection of peer-reviewed journals indexed, linked, and inter-operable with GeoRef.

View the complete list of GeoScienceWorld journal holdings, by publisher.

Interesting short article this morning from JISC (historically, this stood for the Joint Information Systems Committee, – think of it as the British equivalent of maybe the National Research Council?  or Educause? – ” the UK’s expert on digital technology for education and research.”) Their top seven predictions: Researchers will go mobile Lines between professionals, [...]

ImageInteresting short article this morning from JISC (historically, this stood for the Joint Information Systems Committee, – think of it as the British equivalent of maybe the National Research Council?  or Educause? – ” the UK’s expert on digital technology for education and research.”)

Their top seven predictions:

  1. Researchers will go mobile
  2. Lines between professionals, amateurs and the public will blur
  3. Researchers fully embrace social media
  4. Data will drive research across many disciplines
  5. Automate it
  6. Visualize it  (technically these last two are imperatives or exhortations, rather than predictions, but that’s just me being picky)
  7. Researchers as data managers

Read more!  it’s an interesting commentary and good short summary of trends.   How does it match up with your thoughts about how research is changing?

I just heard about the coolest thing, – a collaborative writing tool for scientific articles called Authorea.  I was a little sceptical at first but now I’m seriously interested – see below for webcast screening time/date info, if you get interested too. From their About page: “Built by scientists. For scientists. “Authorea is an online [...]

ImageI just heard about the coolest thing, – a collaborative writing tool for scientific articles called Authorea.  I was a little sceptical at first but now I’m seriously interested – see below for webcast screening time/date info, if you get interested too.

From their About page:

“Built by scientists. For scientists.

“Authorea is an online platform for the collaborative authorship of research papers. Authorea lets you publish, share, organize, version control, and source control all the components of your research. In the backend, Authorea uses git, a robust source and versioning control backend. On the frontend, Authorea adopts the web as its canvas, so that you can write your papers in LaTeX, Markdown, or any other web format, and render them in beautiful HTML5, right inside your browser.

“Authorea is a spin-off initiative of Harvard University and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.”

Here’s an article-in-process:The Bones of the Milky Way, with a variety of authors coordinated by Alyssa Goodman, Harvard Professor of Astronomy.     It’s not like a wiki, where anyone can contribute and edit, – it’s open science, with all the appropriate controls and key requirements to scientific authoring and publication.

Image

Presentation by Authorea co-founder Alberto Pepe

The webcast above is by Harvard postdoctoral fellow Alberto Pepe*, co-founder of Authorea, speaking at a Berkman Center luncheon series in October 2012 about the newly launched tool and the problems in scientific collaboration and authoring that it addresses.

I’m going to air this webcast (it’s about an hour in length) in the Kresge Conference Room next Monday, Jan. 21st at 12:30.    Bring a sandwich and join me!

* Alberto Pepe is a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard University and co-founder of Authorea, a science startup. At Harvard, he is the in-house information scientist at the Center for Astrophysics, a fellow of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society and an affiliate of the Institute for Quantitative Social Science. Pepe is interested in the study of socio–technical systems: networks of people, artifacts, data and ideas. He recently obtained a Ph.D. in Information Science from the University of California, Los Angeles with a dissertation on scientific collaboration networks. Prior to starting his Ph.D., Pepe worked in the Information Technology Department of CERN, in Geneva, Switzerland and in the Scientific Visualization Department of CINECA, the Italian Scientific Consortium, based at the University of Bologna. Pepe holds a M.Sc. in Computer Science and a B.Sc. in Astrophysics, both from University College London, U.K. He was born and raised in the wine-making town of Manduria, in Puglia, Southern Italy.

As you may know, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) has partnered with Wiley to publish/host its journals, and the transition to the Wiley Online Library platform happened at the start of this new year. You may recall reading about it in Jane’s post: AGU Enters Publishing Partnership  with Wiley. In addition, the Library recently acquired the [...]

As you may know, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) has partnered with Wiley to publish/host its journals, and the transition to the Wiley Online Library platform happened at the start of this new year. You may recall reading about it in Jane’s post: AGU Enters Publishing Partnership  with Wiley. In addition, the Library recently acquired the AGU Digital Library Journal Archive, which contains the years 1896–1995 (previously, we were only leasing the content). Here are some tips to help you navigate the new interface:

  • “The Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR) includes articles published between 1949 and 1977, with access to Terrestrial Magnetism (1896-1898) and Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity (1899-1948). In 1978, JGR split into disciplinary sections.” So you’ll need to know which section the article is published in after 1977.
  • If you’re at the top level page of the journal, you can use the search box on the right to search within that journal (see red box in screenshot below).
    AGU_JGR
  • On the top right corner, you can access an RSS feed for that journal as well. (example)
  • You can search across all AGU journals through the Earth and Space Index (EASI) Search.
  • You can also look for articles by their index terms.

For more help, ask your librarian!

We may all be going on holiday break, but if you are like me, learning does not stop. This new list of TED math talks are both educational and fun to watch. You needn’t be a mathematician to enjoy them, really :-) Supplemented here are a handful of books from our library collection or other [...]

We may all be going on holiday break, but if you are like me, learning does not stop. This new list of TED math talks are both educational and fun to watch. You needn’t be a mathematician to enjoy them, really 🙂

Supplemented here are a handful of books from our library collection or other content that is written by the video presenters.

Ron Eglash
African fractals : modern computing and indigenous design
Baker Berry GN650 .E35 1999

Appropriating technology : vernacular science and social power
Feldberg T14.5 .A68 2004

More about Dennis Wildfogel and his video How big is infinity?

Margaret Wertheim
The pearly gates of cyberspace : a history of space from Dante to the Internet
Baker Berry Cook QA76.9.C66 W48 1999

Physics on the fringe : smoke rings, circlons, and alternative theories of everything
Kresge QC20 .W46 2011

Pythagoras’ trousers : God, physics, and the gender wars
Kresge QC19.6 .W47 1995

Mandelbrot – Way too many library books to list
http://bit.ly/T9TRik

And for something to read and most of the libraries are closed, check out Kresge’s popular science collection of books on the shelf or browse it online.