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You may notice this CrossMark symbol on the PDF of a recent journal article you have downloaded. The icon is linked to information about this journal article, and keeps you updated with any changes even though you have downloaded the PDF to your own computer, as long as you are connected to the internet. You …

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CrossMark Link to Information You may notice this CrossMark symbol on the PDF of a recent journal article you have downloaded. The icon is linked to information about this journal article, and keeps you updated with any changes even though you have downloaded the PDF to your own computer, as long as you are connected to the internet. You may also see it on the HTML of an article. The CrossMark icon link will most likely tell you that the version of the journal article you are viewing is current, but it will also warn you if there have been updates to the article, then link to those updates.

CrossMarkUpdatesUpdates could include corrections, changes in a data set,  or retractions.

The DOI (digital object identifier) registration service CrossRef has developed the CrossMark service for use by publishers who use CrossRef DOIs. See CrossMark examples implemented by a variety of publishers.

Join us next Tuesday, January 14, 2014 from 10am-3pm in Baker Main Hall for the Library eResources Fair! Come learn about a broad range of digital information sources and tools that are useful for your work this Winter term. Plus, enjoy hot chocolate and light refreshments, and enter a raffle for prizes such as gift […]
eResourcesFair2014_Poster_Final Slide2

Join us next Tuesday, January 14, 2014 from 10am-3pm in Baker Main Hall for the Library eResources Fair! Come learn about a broad range of digital information sources and tools that are useful for your work this Winter term. Plus, enjoy hot chocolate and light refreshments, and enter a raffle for prizes such as gift certificates to the Computer Store and local businesses!

For students:

  • Explore tools to help you find better information faster and organize that information so that you can find it, use it, and cite it later.
  • Discover the sources of music and images that we license for your use
  • Learn to make videos and other media presentations through the Jones Media Center
  • Learn about authoritative digital resources you can use for research, directly from the people who develop the products

For faculty and staff:

  • Meet and talk directly with those involved in the creation and marketing of scholarly digital resources; bring your questions, complaints, and suggestions for improvement!
  • Learn about text and data mining of these resources for your own research
  • Explore the range and variety of quality digital resources that you would like students to use in their research projects
  • Find resources and tools, such as images or datasets, that you can use in teaching

Filed under: Astronomy, Chemistry, Computer Science, Earth Sciences, Library - General, Math, Physics, Publishing, Research, Science, Tech Tips

Article by Rick Hansen In a December “App Smart” section of The New York Times, columnist Kit Eaton remembers when we were promised paperless lives with amplified Internet accessibility, and most recently, increased mobile technology.  Freedom from the paper trail has not yet arrived, but Eaton’s review of free and for-purchase mobile applications will help […]

Article by Rick Hansen

In a December “App Smart” section of The New York Times, columnist Kit Eaton remembers when we were promised paperless lives with amplified Internet accessibility, and most recently, increased mobile technology.  Freedom from the paper trail has not yet arrived, but Eaton’s review of free and for-purchase mobile applications will help you manage documents and reduce the need to carry around and save physical items.  Click here to read more on the pros and cons of iOS applications such as Readdle’s Scanner Pro, Genius Scan, Perfect OCR, or the Android application Mobile Doc Scanner.

Application Highlights:

Genius Scan

genius-scanUsing your camera on your mobile device, take a picture and store it directly into Genius Scan or utilize your camera’s stored images to import saved pictures.  Genius Scan creates a new PDF file every time an image is uploaded. It also allows you to add to existing documents for multi-page PDFs and helpful organization.

 

You can also export files as a PDF or JPG through email or iAnnotate (for example).  The bonus Wi-Fi-sync option with a nearby computer is available if you like, and you also have the ability to adjust the resolution of an image.  The free version (Genius Scan “Lite”) has sync limitations with Dropbox, Evernote and other cloud storage providers.

Automatic and manual cropping allows you to make the best of your captured image:

genius-scan-screen

Genius Fax

Genius Fax works directly with Genius Scan to allow for faxing a document, when sharing a PDF is not an option. Genius Fax also makes available a cover page when faxing a file, if desired.  Payment in advance is required for each file, prior to sending the fax.

Here is an example of stored fax transactions, and a welcome homepage:

genius-fax
The application’s mobile cover page allows for straightforward fax submission:

genius-fax-screen

Start Lite

Start Lite allows you to create a PDF from a webpage.  The application will become your web browser for quick “PDFMe” options. Alternatively (and after download), you may enter the letter “S” to the beginning of your Safari webpage and the Start Lite PDF option will automatically begin.  Your PDFs are stored for quick access offline, and with this lite app version, 3 free PDFs can be created everyday.

Below:  See how you may use multiple tabs for browsing and you can use menu bars to toggle between views.

start-lite

A summary of open webpages appears on the left-menu column.  Swipe the screen to open or close this menu.  Selecting “new tab” opens a new webpage.  Also, view your stored PDF files by selecting “My PDF Files.”

By selecting “My PDF Files,” the right column lists all of your saved PDFs:

start-lite-screen
Swiping between the three menu pages allows you to see open tabs and webpages (to the far left), stored documents (in the center), and an open document or webpage (on the right):

start-lite-screen2

Gear Up is a great opportunity to explore services and tools, and speak with people available on campus who can support your research endeavors. At the “Impact of Your Work” table, we explore different tools that show the impact of your work/research. Journal articles are the traditional form of publication, but it is only one […]
ImpactPoster

Click here for suggested tools

Gear Up is a great opportunity to explore services and tools, and speak with people available on campus who can support your research endeavors. At the “Impact of Your Work” table, we explore different tools that show the impact of your work/research. Journal articles are the traditional form of publication, but it is only one way to disseminate work. The graphic (right) shows an array of possibilities.

Publication citation is only one way to measure impact. Most people have heard of the h-index, which is the number of papers, h, that have been cited at least h times. You can find your h-index through Web of Science or Google Scholar Citations.

  • In Web of Science, the most accurate way to generate a citation report is to do an “Author Search” and follow the prompts that are meant to find the right author (by field and by affiliation). In addition to h-index, the citation report shows your publication count by year and the number of citations received by year.
  • Google Scholar Citations is another place to find the h-index. You do need to sign up and create a profile (which can be public or private). It can be set up to automatically or manually populate with your publications. The metrics are immediately updated. Check out Prof. David Kotz’s profile as an example!

Some researchers have very common last names and first (and middle) initials so it is difficult to pinpoint their work exactly. Hence, we recommend all researchers sign up for an ORCID identifier, which is similar to having a Social Security Number. Many publishers and funding agencies are now including this as a field in submissions. No matter what variation of your name gets used, as long as it’s associated with this ID, you’ll get credit!

To raise your impact, you have to broaden your reach. One way is to make your work as openly available as possible. For example, you can choose to archive on your website, deposit in a repository, or publish open access.

  • Sherpa ROMEO allows you to search for your publisher’s copyright and self-archiving policies. It’s easy to figure out if you can use the publisher’s final version on your website!
  • The Registry of Open Access Repositories is a listing of world-wide repositories. Dartmouth does not (yet) have an institutional repository (see Carole Meyers if you’d like to learn more).
  • If you’re considering publishing open access, talk to us (namely, Barbara DeFelice)! Dartmouth supports the publication fees for open access journals that qualify under the Compact for Open Access Publishing Equity (COPE).

You can also disseminate your work in many different forms, including figures, graphics, presentations, datasets, code, etc. There are several sites that help facilitate this: figshare, slideshare, github, Dryad, YouTube, etc. This results in new ways of measuring impact and redefining what that means.

  • Altmetrics.org tries to keep track of the most recent tools to have arisen.
  • ImpactStory aggregates impact data from a variety of sources and shows impact of a variety of different forms of dissemination. See a sample profile here.
  • Research Gate is a tool that is growing in popularity here at Dartmouth. I spent some time looking into this and have written up a separate blog post about it. It also has its own metric called an “RG score.”
  • We also have an extensive listing of tools on our Scholarly Publishing & Communication guide.

The scholarly communications landscape is constantly changing and keeping up with trends can be a challenge, but we are here to help! Contact your favorite librarian anytime.

Additional Readings

Article by Katie DeFord, Rick Hansen, and Jeremy Klockars Would you like to easily access the current issues of the Biomedical Libraries’ subscriptions to eJournals without trolling through databases?  After all, databases are designed for searching, not reading.  Now Dartmouth’s subscription to the full features of BrowZine, an application that allows you to easily create your […]

Article by Katie DeFord, Rick Hansen, and Jeremy Klockars

Would you like to easily access the current issues of the Biomedical Libraries’ subscriptions to eJournals without trolling through databases?  After all, databases are designed for searching, not reading.  Now Dartmouth’s subscription to the full features of BrowZine, an application that allows you to easily create your own Newsstand, browse & store, and access thousands of Dartmouth’s eJournals collection.  One of BrowZine’s nice features is your ability to have the articles you need at your fingertips and be able to access them anywhere, anytime!  You can save articles to DropBox, iBooks, Notability, and other services. As of right now, BrowZine doesn’t offer printing, but articles can be opened in other apps that allow printing depending which you have installed on your iPad.

browzine vs. web

Dartmouth’s subscription to BrowZine allows you to create your own journal shelf. Simply browse the Dartmouth College Libraries’ eJournal collection, choose the titles you want on your shelf, download articles of interest and save references.  Currently, not all of Dartmouth’s e-journal subscriptions are available using BrowZine.  See a list of participating publishers here.  You can sign up for a newsletter to receive new updates about product releases through BrowZine.

browzine2

Instructions for installing BrowZine:

  • From the App Store on your iPad, download the free BrowZine app.
  • For off-campus access you will need the Dartmouth VPN to access the collection. For instructions on setting up VPN on your iPad click here.
  • When installing BrowZine on campus (Dartmouth or DHMC/Lebanon), click “continue” when prompted with “VPN required at Dartmouth College.”
  • When you open BrowZine for the first time, you will see a list of schools; please select “Dartmouth College.”
  • BrowZine is also available at the Google Play and Amazon/Kindle stores for Android tablets. For more about BrowZine, see http://thirdiron.com/browzine/

Please send questions or comments to: 
Matthews-Fuller.Library.Circulation@dartmouth.edu

1

If you decide to digitize a collection of images, such as a photo album or a slideshow, there are literally thousands of different software solutions to go about organizing them. Many of these can come bundled with scanning or photo software, and often...

If you decide to digitize a collection of images, such as a photo album or a slideshow, there are literally thousands of different software solutions to go about organizing them. Many of these can come bundled with scanning or photo software, and often those can offer a relatively low-cost and hassle-free solution to keeping track of your images.

However, if you want to ensure the maximum compatibility and usability of your images over the long term, there are more advanced options available through Adobe's very popular line of professional software. The complete Creative Suite (and the newly-offered Creative Cloud) feature an almost overwhelming amount of tools, from film editing to website design, along with the nigh-essential Photoshop.

Two of these programs are designed for the main purpose of organizing and viewing large collections of images; something you might imagine is essential to the kinds of digitization projects taken on by the Dartmouth College Library's Digital Production Unit. Adobe Bridge and Adobe Lightroom each offer distinct advantages over the other, and while they may share some purposes, it can save you a lot of time to know which one suits your project best.

Adobe Bridge is, as its name implies, an excellent way to organize many different kinds of media, "bridging" many formats. It is designed to play nicely with all other Adobe programs, and offers an excellent alternative to the standard Mac OS Finder, or Windows Explorer when it comes to browsing collections. The interface can be altered modularly to suit a project, meaning you can re-size, add or delete tools from the main screen with great ease. Additionally, you can add or alter image metadata, and do batch file renaming. Its flexibility is its best selling point, making it a helpful addition to any Adobe-based workflow.

Lightroom, on the other hand, is designed specifically for photographs. In addition to letting users browse through collections of photographs, Lightoom offers far more tools for photo-editing than Bridge, and presents them in a way that is familiar for professional or amateur photographers. While at first blush this would appear similar to running a combination of Bridge and Photoshop, it actually has a few interesting tricks of its own.

The most important thing about Lightroom is to think of it within the context of a photographer's studio. The program is designed to take raw camera files (.dng is the most common format) and apply various changes to it without altering the originals. The entire editing action takes place within the Lightroom environment, so you are never in danger of losing data. You can think of your raw camera files as digital negatives, to be used and reused to create different print files. Lightroom easily stores setting data, allowing you to export as many kinds of derivative files as are needed. However, it is designed around these features. If you want to make actual changes to a master document you'll have to use Photoshop.

Between these two programs we can respond to all kinds of challenges in the Digital Production Unit, organizing and reworking files in the manner best suited to the project.

Written by Ryland Ianelli 

Watch this short introduction to BrowZine (two minutes, but you’ll get the idea right away) BrowZine is a new app that the Library is testing out through August that lets you create your own virtual current journal shelf on your iPad or other tablet. You can browse the Library’s journal collection, choose the titles you […]

Watch this short introduction to BrowZine (two minutes, but you’ll get the idea right away)

BrowZine is a new app that the Library is testing out through August that lets you create your own virtual current journal shelf on your iPad or other tablet. You can browse the Library’s journal collection, choose the titles you want on your shelf, download articles of interest for later reading, and save references.

Not all the journals that the Library subscribes to are available, but there is a pretty huge collection, especially in the sciences. View the publisher list here.

To use BrowZine:

  • From your iPad, download the free BrowZine app from the App Store and install it.
  • When you open BrowZine for the first time, you will see a list of schools; please select “Dartmouth College.”
  • Select the subject areas and start browsing, or select titles from the list and create your own bookshelf.
  • You will need VPN for working from off campus. For instructions on setting up VPN on your iPad, see: http://www.dartmouth.edu/comp/soft-comp/software/downloads/mobile_devices.html

BrowZine is also available at the Google Play and Amazon/Kindle stores for Android tablets. For more about BrowZine, see: http://thirdiron.com/browzine/

You can access BrowZine with Dartmouth College Library subscriptions loaded (on a trial basis) from August 2, 2013 through August 31, 2013.

And last but not least, send us feedback or we won’t know whether you like this app or not. As with so many things in life, if you don’t ask, you don’t get.

When I was an undergraduate student I worked in my college library’s Visual Resource Collection in a somewhat similar position to the one I’m in now. The VRC was primarily a resource for my school’s Art History Department (my major), and their main asset was row upon row of metal filing cabinets filled to the brim with 35mm slides.

As the years went on, we unsurprisingly saw more and more art history professors moving towards digital teaching tools. As such, the VRC department had no choice but to move with the times and focus on the digitization of their existing collection.

This was my first experience scanning 35mm slides, and while it fundamentally follows the same principles as scanning anything else, there are some considerations to be made. The main question is one of scanner preference: mechanical feed or flatbed?

Nikon Super COOLSCAN 9000 ED; a professional-quality mechanical feed slide and negative scanner I used at my previous job. Image copyright Nikon USA.

Mechanical feed slide scanners have several distinct advantages: they are smaller and very easily portable; they are often designed to accept large batches of scans in a workflow environment; and they require very little adjustment or calibration on the user end. However, there are drawbacks as well. Much like the mechanical feed photo scanner, it is prone to dust. This dust is significantly more troublesome in the final product due to the small size of the originals. Additionally, the user-friendliness can sometimes translate to poor customizability. And of course, the slide scanner’s utility is limited to 35mm slides or film negatives.

The Epson Expression 10000XL, with transparency unit and slides ready for scanning

While flatbed scanners are designed with larger printed material in mind, often times these too can accept slides or photo negatives with certain peripheral attachments. In the Dartmouth Library Digital Production Unit, our Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner has such attachments. The biggest and most crucial is the transparency unit. This piece replaces the original scanner cover with what is essentially a lightbox, backlighting the slides and providing consistent illumination. Additionally, there are slide and negative holders that help keep your images consistent.

The biggest drawback to the flatbed scanner is that sometimes the scanner itself has not been designed for the high-resolution settings required to scan such small objects at archival quality. Usually a good resolution for 35mm slides is 2,400 dpi; four times the resolution of our usual scans. A good high-quality scanner should have no problem with this, but many consumer-level scanners simply can’t scan a resolution that high.

While our Digital Production Department has not had much reason to incorporate slide and negative scanning into our workflow thusfar, it can’t hurt to be prepared for whatever digitization projects come our way.

When I was an undergraduate student I worked in my college library’s Visual Resource Collection in a somewhat similar position to the one I’m in now. The VRC was primarily a resource for my school’s Art History Department (my major), and their main asset was row upon row of metal filing cabinets filled to the brim with 35mm slides.

As the years went on, we unsurprisingly saw more and more art history professors moving towards digital teaching tools. As such, the VRC department had no choice but to move with the times and focus on the digitization of their existing collection.

This was my first experience scanning 35mm slides, and while it fundamentally follows the same principles as scanning anything else, there are some considerations to be made. The main question is one of scanner preference: mechanical feed or flatbed?

Nikon Super COOLSCAN 9000 ED; a professional-quality mechanical feed slide and negative scanner I used at my previous job. Image copyright Nikon USA.

Mechanical feed slide scanners have several distinct advantages: they are smaller and very easily portable; they are often designed to accept large batches of scans in a workflow environment; and they require very little adjustment or calibration on the user end. However, there are drawbacks as well. Much like the mechanical feed photo scanner, it is prone to dust. This dust is significantly more troublesome in the final product due to the small size of the originals. Additionally, the user-friendliness can sometimes translate to poor customizability. And of course, the slide scanner’s utility is limited to 35mm slides or film negatives.

The Epson Expression 10000XL, with transparency unit and slides ready for scanning

While flatbed scanners are designed with larger printed material in mind, often times these too can accept slides or photo negatives with certain peripheral attachments. In the Dartmouth Library Digital Production Unit, our Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner has such attachments. The biggest and most crucial is the transparency unit. This piece replaces the original scanner cover with what is essentially a lightbox, backlighting the slides and providing consistent illumination. Additionally, there are slide and negative holders that help keep your images consistent.

The biggest drawback to the flatbed scanner is that sometimes the scanner itself has not been designed for the high-resolution settings required to scan such small objects at archival quality. Usually a good resolution for 35mm slides is 2,400 dpi; four times the resolution of our usual scans. A good high-quality scanner should have no problem with this, but many consumer-level scanners simply can’t scan a resolution that high.

While our Digital Production Department has not had much reason to incorporate slide and negative scanning into our workflow thus far, it can’t hurt to be prepared for whatever digitization projects come our way.

Keep those digital treasures safe! Schedule automatic backups through your operating system. Back them up using an external hard drive or Internet storage! Avoid long-term storage on CDs, DVDs, and flash drives. For more information check out the Libr...

Keep those digital treasures safe! Schedule automatic backups through your operating system. Back them up using an external hard drive or Internet storage! Avoid long-term storage on CDs, DVDs, and flash drives. For more information check out the Library of Congress at http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/personalarchiving/

Preservation Week at Dartmouth College Library is part of an annual event sponsored by the American Library Association to raise awareness of preservation issues and solutions. For more information visit our website.

I could have titled this post ‘Keeping Up To Date With Table of Contents Alerts’.  We had a great turnout for our Gear Up event held in Baker Hall this week. Did you miss it? The table I staffed was busy with questions about using varied publisher services for Table of Contents (TOC) Alerts &  [...]

scidirect tocI could have titled this post ‘Keeping Up To Date With Table of Contents Alerts’.  We had a great turnout for our Gear Up event held in Baker Hall this week. Did you miss it? The table I staffed was busy with questions about using varied publisher services for Table of Contents (TOC) Alerts &  Search Alerts.

If you want to be notified when a new volume of a journal becomes available, set up a Journal Alert. One way to do this for a journal in ScienceDirect is from an article page in a specific journal. Locate “Alert me about new articles in this journal/book series under More options”. This step is pictured in the image featured in this post. You’ll need to set up a ScienceDirect login to complete this step.

Science Direct has added a new Articles-in-Press (AiP) section to their journal alerts. The AiPs are articles which are accepted for publication, but not yet officially published.

Now what if you want to setup a topic alert? I’ll use the term “Digital Humanities” as an example here. As this topic is cross disciplinary and not necessarily standardized as a subject term, I’ll do my search as a simple search in “All Fields”. When logged into your ScienceDirect account, you’ll see the option to “Save as search alert”. Just select this option and enter a name for your topic alert. You can change the frequency for the alerts to run, or delete them as well.

alert

Read further for previous posts on this topic.