Category Archives: Papers

Nutrient-Toxic Element Mixtures and the Early Postnatal Gut Microbiome…

Dartmouth Superfund Program (SRP) researchers Brian Jackson and Margaret Karagas and Trainee Hannah Laue (lead author) are co-authors of the paper Nutrient-Toxic Element Mixtures and the Early Postnatal Gut Microbiome and in a United States Longitudinal Birth Cohort. The study concluded that “Early postnatal toxic and nutrient elemental exposures are associated with differences in the infant microbiome. Further research is needed to clarify the whether these alterations are a biomarker of exposure or if they have implications for child and lifelong health.” The paper was  published in the journal Environment International.

Mercury Levels in Freshwater Fish: Estimating Concentration with Fish Length…

Dartmouth Superfund Research Program (SRP) researchers Celia Chen and Kate Buckman are co-authors of the paper Mercury Levels in Freshwater Fish: Estimating Concentration with Fish Length to Determine Exposures Through Fish Consumption. According to the paper, “…many studies only measure adults to characterize the health of locally fished populations, omitting information about how local fish bioaccumulate mercury relative to their growth. In this study, we sought to establish length: total mercury (THg) concentration relationships in juvenile and adult fish of four genera (sunfish, yellow perch, white perch, and killifish) across six freshwater pond systems of Nantucket Island to determine safe consumption sizes across species and environmental conditions.” the paper was published in the journal Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology.

Dragonfly Larvae Biosentinels of Mercury Bioaccumulation in Northeastern & Adirondack Lakes…

Dartmouth Superfund Research Program (SRP) researcher and director Celia Chen is co-author of the paper Dragonfly Larvae as Biosentinels of Hg Bioaccumulation in Northeastern and Adirondack Lakes: Relationships to Abiotic Factors. The study sampled lake water and dragonfly larvae in 74 northeastern US lakes that are part of the US EPA Long-Term Monitoring Network to examine whether Dragonfly larvae can serve as biosentinels for Mercury (Hg) in biota. The paper was published in the journal Ecotoxicology.

Mercury and Selenium Concentrations, and Selenium:mercury Molar Ratios in Small Cetaceans Taken Off St. Vincent, West Indies

Dartmouth Superfund Program (SRP) researcher Brian Jackson is co-author of the paper Mercury and Selenium Concentrations, and Selenium:mercury Molar Ratios in Small Cetaceans Taken Off St. Vincent, West Indies. According to the paper, the “high THg (total mercury) concentrations in cetacean tissues in this study, along with the high number of small cetaceans that are taken for human consumption each year, and the frequency at which cetacean products are consumed, suggests that consumption of small cetaceans in St. Vincent is a human health issue that warrants further investigation. Future policy changes or advisories may be needed to inform the public, especially regarding the consumption of killer whales and short-finned pilot whales.” The paper is published in the journal Environmental Research.

Rice Intake and Emerging Concerns on Arsenic in Rice: a Review of the Human Evidence and Methodologic Challenges

Dartmouth Superfund Research Program (SRP) researchers Margaret Karagas (lead author) and Tracy Punshon are co-authors of the paper Rice Intake and Emerging Concerns on Arsenic in Rice: a Review of the Human Evidence and Methodologic Challenges. The paper, which was published in the journal Current Environmental Health Reports, summarizes “…the state of the epidemiologic evidence on whether rice consumption relates to health outcomes associated with arsenic exposure.” The  article recommends that “further studies are needed to understand the health impacts of arsenic exposure from rice consumption taking into account all sources of rice intake and potential confounding by other dietary constituents or contaminants and arsenic exposure from sources such as water.”

Communicating Arsenic’s Risks

Dartmouth Superfund Research Program Director Celia Chen, former Dartmouth Superfund Research Program Community Engagement Core (CEC) Leaders Shannon Rogers (lead author) and Mark Borsuk, current Research Translation Coordinator Laurie Rardin, and former CEC Coordinator Kathrin Lawlor are co-authors of the paper Communicating Arsenic’s Risks. The study describes “two types of environmental communication efforts that have been undertaken by the Dartmouth Toxic Metals Superfund Research Program (DTMSRP)-the development and evaluation of a comprehensive website, Arsenic and You, and a mental models research approach to better understand the disconnect between expert and community perceptions of arsenic risk.” The paper is published in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.

Preliminary Investigation of Polymer-Based In Situ Passive Samplers for Mercury and Methylmercury

Dartmouth Superfund Research Program researchers Vivien Taylor (lead author) and Kate Buckman are co-authors of the paper Preliminary Investigation of Polymer-Based In Situ Passive Samplers for Mercury and Methylmercury, which was published in Chemosphere.  In their study, the “development of an in situ passive sampler for mercury (Hg), and its toxic form, methylmercury (MeHg), using simple polymer films, was explored for the potential to make an efficient and environmentally relevant monitoring tool for this widespread aquatic pollutant.”

Validity of Retrospective Occupational Exposure Estimates of Lead and Manganese in a Case-Control Study

Dartmouth Superfund Research Program researchers Margaret Karagas and Brian Jackson are co-authors of the paper Validity of Retrospective Occupational Exposure Estimates of Lead and Manganese in a Case-Control Study. The study used toenail samples as bioindicators of exposure and “assessed whether work tasks and expert assessments of occupational metal exposure obtained from personal interviews were associated with lead and manganese concentrations”. The paper is published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine.

Effects of Temperature, Salinity, and Sediment Organic Carbon on Methylmercury Bioaccumulation …

Dartmouth Superfund Program researchers Celia Chen, Kate Buckman and Vivien Taylor are co-authors of a paper that “examined the individual and combined effects of temperature, sediment organic carbon, and salinity on the bioaccumulation of MeHg in an estuarine amphipod, Leptocheirus plumulosus, when exposed to sediment from two locations in the Gulf of Maine (Kittery and Bass Harbor) that contained different levels of MeHg and organic carbon.” The paper, Effects of Temperature, Salinity, and Sediment Organic Carbon on Methylmercury Bioaccumulation in an Estuarine Amphipod, is published in Science of the Total Environment.