Edible Science with Amanda

As the weather gets warmer, it’s hard not to long for days spent outside without coats on in normal circumstances. As our staff as transitioned to remote work, we’ve had the pleasure of seeing each other in our home environments. This includes watching Amanda, our Head of Education and Information Services, dawn a coat so that her daughter can enjoy their backyard while she meets virtually with us.

If we’re being honest, I think we’re all a little jealous of the preschool that Amanda has been running the last few weeks. From baking to bouncy balls made from a kit, it’s all we can do not to enroll in her little school. Amanda and her daughter (4) give the thumbs up on these edible science experiments:

  1. Make your own rock candy

You probably have all the ingredients to make these at your house already, according to Paging Fun Mums all you need is 2-3 cups of sugar, 1 cup of water and food coloring (honestly these would still be delicious without the food coloring). Boil the water in a saucepan and stir in the sugar until the solution is supersaturated. In other words, keep stirring the sugar until it no longer dissolves. For those of you who haven’t been in a lab for a while, be patient. It takes a long time for a solution to become supersaturated. Skimping out on this step will ruin your rock candy. Paging Fun Mums then suggests coating your skewers (this works with string too) in plain sugar before setting them aside in a glass or jar.

“All” you have to do then is wait 2-3 days and your candy is done! Pro tip from Amanda: While the food coloring is fun, it can make it hard to see whether or not the crystals are growing. This mattered more from the parental side, as she wanted to ensure that the experiment would yield good results.

What an awesome way to discuss a little bit of chemistry, it doesn’t help that rock candy tastes good.

 

2. Homemade Gummy Bears

This one requires a little more than what the average person has in their pantry, but only because we’re assuming not everyone has a candy mold and gelatin lying around their house. Otherwise, we couldn’t believe how easy it was to make these snacks at home!

Start by combining the gelatins with cold water, then let them sit for about 10 minutes. Microwave the solution and add in the sugar. Stir until the sugar dissolves and then pour the solution into your mold (pro tip: spray the mold with cooking spray). Pop the mold in the refrigerator and in about 20 minutes you’ll have your gummies!

Just think of all the flavor possibilities! You can even add some citric acid if you want them sour. Step aside Haribo, you’ve got some homemade competition!

This post was written by Paige Scudder, Research and Education Librarian for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Researching COVID19

COVID 19 molecule

Are you searching the ever-changing biomedical literature for information about COVID-19? Librarians have identified a number of search strategies for researchers who are searching for up-to-date information about COVID-19 from the literature. The Dartmouth Biomedical Librarians are happy to work with you on your searches related to COVID-19 (or other searches and projects too!)—let us know by making a Zoom appointment with one of us: https://www.dartmouth.edu/~library/biomed/services/appointments.html.

  • Are you searching PubMed? Paste the following into the PubMed search box and add your search terms:

2019-nCoV OR 2019nCoV OR COVID-19 OR SARS-CoV-2 OR ((wuhan AND coronavirus) AND 2019/12[PDAT]:2030[PDAT])

You can also directly search the daily-updated LitCovid resource: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/research/coronavirus/.

  •  Are you searching MEDLINE via Ovid? Paste the following into the Ovid search box and add your search terms:

(coronavir* OR corona virus* OR betacoronavir* OR covid19 OR covid 19 OR nCoV OR CoV 2 OR CoV2 OR sarscov2 OR 2019nCoV OR 2019 novel coronavirus* OR 2019 novel CoV OR wuhan virus*).mp. OR ((wuhan OR hubei OR huanan) AND (severe acute respiratory OR pneumonia*) AND outbreak*).mp. 

Note: set up alerts for your searches so you’ll receive updates when new literature is published! For more information on this, visit the CDC COVID-19 research guide: https://www.cdc.gov/library/researchguides/2019NovelCoronavirus.html

We have a number of other tools and resources available to help with your research on this and other topics—please reach out!

This post was written by Elaina Vitale, a Research and Education Librarian for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Cells at Work

Hataraku Saibou. Aniplex, David Production, Kodansha; 2018.

In these times of social distancing and staying at home, many of us are looking for new shows to watch to help the time pass. On top of that, school closures mean we have kids to look after and finding entertainment for them that is both fun and educational is essential. Allow us to offer a solution that may be appealing to all. Cells at Work, created by Akane Shimizu, is a Netflix anime about the daily lives of the cells in a human body, depicted as people with jobs and personality quirks (there is an excellent English dubbed version). The structure of the body looks like apartment buildings (cells), roads (blood vessels), and factories (organs); the “average” cells of the body wear white t-shirts and live in the apartments. The main character is Red Blood Cell, a red-headed, jacket and shorts-wearing girl with a map and a pushcart full of oxygen. She’s new to the job and is completely lost trying to find her way to the lungs. She’s attacked by Pneumococcus, portrayed as a sassy scheming purple monster, but is saved just in time by White Blood Cell, wearing a jumpsuit and sporting an emo hairstyle, accompanied by an even more emo personality. True to his cell nature, he likes to enter scenes unexpectedly from vents, drains, and impossibly thin cracks in the walls, and goes from brooding to barbarian-mode the second he spots an enemy.

Episodes tend to focus on a different type of “enemy” or situation that the internal body has to deal with: scheming bacteria, virus zombies, allergies, abrasions, blood-loss, and truly disturbing cancer cells. While dealing with these scenarios, either the main characters or a narrator explains what each new development is, so that the viewer can learn about the nature of that particular cell/situation. For example, when a new character type is introduced (Platelets, Microphage, Killer T Cells), their job description is mentioned by another character before quickly being followed by the narrator explaining in a more detailed, formal way. It becomes educational for kids, and fun for adults to see how these cells/situations are portrayed in this format. For those of us who watched Osmosis Jones or The Magic School Bus, this show is along those vibes.

Now, forgive the unavoidable pun, but this show features an excessive amount of blood. Yes, that does mean the main characters are all blood cells, but it also means that this is an anime, which is a genre known for excessive gore. Luckily this show is on the lighter side, but the characters themselves somehow bleed, and it’s especially exaggerated whenever White Blood Cell kills an invader. Also, the depiction of cancer cells are the stuff of nightmares, which certainly addresses the seriousness of cancer, but still, yuck. So, if you or your child veer towards being easily disturbed, perhaps this show wouldn’t be the best choice. However, give the first episode a shot and see how you feel, because the beauty of this show is that it’s able to educate about how the human body works in a way that is both unexpectedly funny (the overreaction to allergies) and occasionally deeply moving (the birth and death of a cancer cell.)

This post was written by Samara Cary, an Information Access Assistant  for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Finding Clinical Practice Guidelines

Are you stumped by searching for clinical practice guidelines for your specialty or healthcare topic? They can be tricky to find! Note that while many guidelines are freely available, you’ll find that some are behind society paywalls despite our subscription access to various resources.

We provide a number of subscription resources that can make finding clinical practice guidelines easier (follow steps here to make sure you are getting full access if you’re off-campus):

  • DynaMed makes finding point of care health information speedy and painless, and is particularly helpful for providing evidence summaries and synopses of health topics. DynaMed also provides quick access to clinical guidelines when available. To access these for a given topic, navigate to the left and scroll down in the menu until you come to Guidelines. We like these because DynaMed provides international and US guidelines, and beyond (with full-text links when available). They are updated frequently.
  • UpToDate also makes finding guidelines and other evidence-based information easy. Similar to DynaMed, you can find Society Guidelines linked from the navigation bar on the left for a given health topic. You can also search “society guideline + your topic” in the main search bar to go directly to the list of national and international guidelines provided by UpToDate. Full-text is provided when available.

Other places to look:

ECRI Guidelines Trust provides a clearinghouse of clinical guidelines. In some cases for guidelines listed on ECRI, you’ll be able to find ratings of how well they satisfy the IOM Standards for Trustworthy Guidelines. We recommend this feature for finding high-quality evidence-based information—around 500 of the guidelines available on ECRI have been rated. Access to ECRI is free but you’ll first need to register for an account on their homepage.

  • The American Family Physician website provides handy guideline access to “commonly sought” topics in family medicine. Their topic areas are expansive, and new content is added as it becomes available. Note that guidelines from the last year will require paid access to AFP’s content.
  • Guidelines are searchable on PubMed. Type your topic (such as a condition, symptom, or clinical procedure) in the search box, select “Additional filters” on the far left and check the box next to “Practice Guideline” under the section labeled “Type of Article.” Select the “Practice Guideline” box to apply the filter to your results.

This post was written by Elaina Vitale, a Research and Education Librarian for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Biomedical Libraries Closed — Services are still Available

Dana Biomedical Library and Matthews-Fuller Health Sciences Library will be CLOSED starting March 18, 2020 – but our services are OPEN.

From 8AM – 5PM Monday – Friday we are available online for you:

We will continue to offer virtual workshops, consultations, Live Chat, AskUs and as always, you will have 24/7 access to our electronic resources on the Biomedical Libraries Website.

• Information on Remote Access to Resources
• Help with access and research questions via AskUs and Live Chat
Library workshops are still occurring via Zoom
• Librarians are also available for consultations and assistance via Zoom
• You can continue to request journal articles through Document Delivery
• For problems with e-resources or to renew library items, contact us through Ask Us and Live Chat

We apologize for the inconvenience during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thank you in advance for your understanding of our efforts to keep the safety of our community first in our decisions.

This post was written by Stephanie Kerns, Amanda Scull and Michael Ennis for the Biomedical Libraries.

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New DynaMed Feature: Drug Interaction Checker

DynaMed just released a new feature: Drug Interaction Checker. With the DynaMed Drug Interaction Checker, you can…

  • Easily check a patient’s entire medication list at the same time
  • Quickly understand the severity of the interaction using the 5-point severity rating and supporting evidence
  • View results by severity, documentation, and type of drug interaction
  • Search by brand and generic names of drugs
  • Interpret quality and type of interaction evidence with a four-level documentation rating system

To use the Drug interaction checker, go to DynaMed and select “drug interactions”.

Next, enter at least two drugs that you would like to check for interactions.

screenshot of dynamed's drug interaction checker

Finally, read the results.

In addition to viewing interactions, you also have the option to view Drug/Ethanol interactions, Drug/Lab interactions, and Drug/Tobacco interactions by utilizing the display drop-down menu.

Screenshot of DynaMed's drug interaction display options.

This post was written by Paige Scudder, a Research and Education Librarian for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Welcome Michael and Sam!

Michael Ennis is our new Library Technology Coordinator. In this newly revised position, Michael’s responsibilities will include installing and maintaining Biomedical Libraries’ staff and public computers, maintaining the Biomed website in conjunction with Biomed staff and DLTG, building relationships with DHMC, Geisel, and Dartmouth College IT staff, and providing hardware and software training for Biomedical Libraries staff and users. He most recently worked at the Killington Pico Ski Resort, where he provided technology and information systems support.

Samantha Wiebkin is our newest Information Access Assistant. Sam is a graduate of the New Hampshire Institute of Art, where she majored in illustration and creative writing.  For the past several years Sam has worked as a circulation and reference substitute at the Lebanon Public Libraries. She has also been a Creative Arts Specialist at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, providing therapeutic art projects for patients and support groups.

Sam an artist, spending time painting in gouache and oils and working on a comic (check it out on her Instagram). When she’s not at the library or working on her art, she enjoys reading, baking, gardening, and hiking. Looking to start a conversation with Sam? Ask her about her cat!

We’re so excited to have Michael and Sam on board and hope you help us in welcoming them both.

This post was written by Paige Scudder, a Research and Education Librarian for the Biomedical Libraries.

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March 2020 Workshop Schedule

Are you a nurse looking to utilize CINAHL and other information sources? Perhaps you’re interested in joining a journal club to discuss all things related to research transparency and reproducibility. Maybe you’re interested in mobile resources for you and your patients.

This month our workshops focus on CINHAL, mobile resources and publishing 101.

ReproducibiliTea – an open and reproducible science journal club

  • What we’re reading: A Manifesto for Reproducible Science, read at: Dartgo.org/RT1
  • When: March 4th, 2020 from 3 – 4:00 pm
  • Where: Anonymous Hall 113 (The Guarini Conference Room)
  • Description: Dartmouth ReproducibiliTea,  a journal club for discussing all things related to research transparency and reproducibility, meets every third Wednesday 3-4 pm. Everyone is welcome to join us – skeptics and enthusiasts alike!  Tea, cookies, and lively discussions will be provided.All papers available at Dartgo.org/RTpapers (full-text available under attachments)

    Generously sponsored by the Dartmouth Library Innovation Fund

    Questions?  leligdon@dartmouth.edu

CINAHL and Other Information Resources for Nurses

  • When: March 5th, 2020 from 8 – 9:00 am
  • Where: Matthews-Fuller Library, DHMC and Zoom
  • Description: CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) indexes the nursing and allied health literature. This workshop covers searching tips and techniques and accessing full-text journal articles. We’ll also look at other useful web-based resources, including sources of information for patients. Hands-on time is included in this workshop.This workshop will be offered in-person and via Zoom. Please register to receive the Zoom link.
  • Registration is required for this event.

Mobile Resources for Biomedical Practice and Research

  • When: March 10th, 2020 from 8 – 9:00 am
  • Where: Matthews-Fuller Library, DHMC
  • Description: Looking to use your favorite websites on your phone? There’s an app for that! This workshop will cover point of care, drug and patient education apps for both Android and iPhone users. Bring your phone or tablet and follow along!
  • Registration is required for this event.

Publishing 101: Where to Publish, Author Rights, and Copyright

  • When: March 20th, 2020 from 12 – 1:00 pm
  • Where: Matthews-Fuller Library, DHMC and Zoom
  • Description: This workshop will provide an introduction to clinicians and researchers who are looking to submit their research for publication. How do you decide where to publish? What does it mean for a publication to be open access? What about all of those email solicitations I get from publishers? We’ll answer these and other questions!This workshop will be offered in-person and via Zoom. Please register to receive the Zoom link.
  • Registration is required for this event.

ReproducibiliTea – an open and reproducible science journal club

  • What we’re reading: Why Most Published Research Findings are False, read at: Dartgo.org/RT2
  • When: March 25th, 2020 from 3 – 4:00 pm
  • Where: Anonymous Hall 113 (The Guarini Conference Room)
  • Description: Dartmouth ReproducibiliTea,  a journal club for discussing all things related to research transparency and reproducibility, meets every third Wednesday 3-4 pm. Everyone is welcome to join us – skeptics and enthusiasts alike!  Tea, cookies, and lively discussions will be provided.All papers available at Dartgo.org/RTpapers (full-text available under attachments)

    Generously sponsored by the Dartmouth Library Innovation Fund

    Questions?  leligdon@dartmouth.edu

This post was written by Paige Scudder, a Research and Education Librarian for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Looking to access the library off campus?

There are a few tips and tricks when it comes to accessing the library off-campus.

  1. Start on the Biomedical Library homepage. By starting on our homepage, you will be proxied into databases such as PubMed and Scopus and the subscriptions that we subscribe to.
  2. Create an account with DynaMed and UpToDate while on campus and make sure to log in on campus at least every three months to confirm that you are still affiliated with us. You can also utilize these accounts to log into the DynaMed and UpToDate apps on your phone/tablet.
  3. Utilize Dartmouth’s VPN Global protect. Global protect is a service that makes secure remote access to the Dartmouth network for Dartmouth faculty, staff, and students. If you haven’t downloaded it yet, there are instructions for both Mac and Windows users to help you set it up.

If you’re having trouble accessing the library when you’re off-campus, let us know by sending us an email, shooting us a message on chat, or giving us a call: 603-650-1658(Dana Library) or 603-650-7658 (Matthew’s Fuller). Remember, it’s important to us that you’re able to find what you’re looking for and that you have access to the resources that you need.

This post was written by Paige Scudder, a Research and Education Librarian for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Cultural Competence in Healthcare

Electrocardiogram printout, medication, upturned glasses, Stethoscope

https://pixabay.com/photos/ecg-electrocardiogram-stethoscope-1953179/

According to the 2018 National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report from the AHRQ, from 2016-2017 blacks, American Indians and Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders received worse than whites for 40% of quality measures. For Hispanics, the level of disparity was about 35%. A systematic review published in 2017 in BMC Medical Ethics found that in most articles, evidence of implicit bias from physicians – related to race, ethnicity, age, gender, or weight – was present and that the presence of bias correlated to a lower quality of care. Access to healthcare is limited by other factors as well, including language barriers and low literacy.

The goal of culturally competent health care services is to provide the highest quality of care to every patient, regardless of race, ethnicity, cultural background, English proficiency or literacy (Georgetown University). The Biomedical Libraries support the Geisel and Dartmouth-Hitchcock communities by providing resources for increasing knowledge, skills, and cultural awareness. We can help you find patient education materials in languages other than English, data on healthcare disparities, and current practices in culturally competent care.

Visit our research guide on Cultural Competence in Healthcare for a curated collection of websites, journals, and books addressing healthcare needs of LBTQ+ individuals, American Indians, and minority groups in rural, urban, and global settings. Please also reach out to us if you have any suggestions for resource additions for this guide!

This post was written by Amanda Scull, Head of Education and Information Services for the Biomedical Libraries.

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