Introducing Our Newest Libguide: Graphic Medicine

There is a lot of wonderful literature and comic work going on in the realm of Graphic Medicine, especially in the current climate of COVID-19, but before creating our own Graphic Medicine Libguide we had to first define what Graphic Medicine is. The amazing thing about Graphic Medicine is that its definition and the content that falls within it is fairly broad. At its core, Graphic Medicine is the intersection between comics and health care. The goal of the libguide is to highlight a little bit of everything within that definition and provide an even scope of what comics can do with medical narratives and the benefits that come out of that work. In selecting comics to include in the guide it was obvious that the stories of patients, providers, med students, and caregivers would all be showcased in some way. The guide is not exhaustive in the slightest but it is an appetizer of sorts to help steer the user towards what aspects of Graphic Medicine interest them most.

For students, the hope is that if you’ve never heard of or read any Graphic Medicine work that this guide might spark some interest in seeing how you can combine your own experience in health care with comics. This could be by diving into some of the scholarly literature about the value of comics in medicine and education, checking out a Graphic Medicine book or reading a webcomic, or trying your hand at comic creation using the tools and tips linked in the guide. Your stories are important and comics are a versatile medium for presenting those stories and can be a beneficial form of self-expression. Comics have the ability to focus our attention through the combination of text and visual images and have a universality that makes their stories easy to understand and relate to.

Check out Our Newest Libguide: Graphic Medicine

This post was written by Samantha Wiebkin, an Information Access Assistant for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Getting to Know the Biomedical Libraries’ Staff: An interview with Jeremy Klockars

1. What is your job and how long have you worked for the Dartmouth Biomedical Libraries?

I am the Library Supervisor at Matthews-Fuller Health Sciences Library. I’ve worked for the Biomedical Libraries for over 12 years.

2. What is your favorite part about your job?

My favorite part is definitely working with patrons at the information desk and assisting them with all of their information needs.

Homemade cookies on an orange plate3. What is your least favorite part about your job?

The fact that I work in an office that doesn’t have any windows. A window would be distracting but enjoyable.

4. How are you spending your isolation?

I have gotten back into baking, which has been great. I’ve been using cookbooks I have that I’ve never opened before, and finding great recipes from King Arthur Flour; and stealing recipes from @violetcakeslondon on instagram. She published a cookbook a while ago that I want to buy: The Violet Bakery Cookbook

homemade ham and pineapple pizza5. What pantry meal are you proudest of? 

My new favorite recipe is the King Arthur Flour Crispy Cheesy Pan Pizza. I’ve made it half a dozen times and love it. 

6. What are you reading/watching during your isolation?

I usually listen to presidential biographies while driving, but since that isn’t happening as much I have picked up a short book on the American Revolution, and I’m re-reading Barbara Kingsolver’s Animal, Vegetable, Miracle.

7. What is your hobby? Name your top 5 (hobby-related) recommendations and why.

homemade bunt cakeMy hobby is working on my family genealogy. This pandemic has given me lots of time to work on that during my evenings and weekends. 

My top 5 recommendations are:

  1. American Ancestors
  2. Ancestry.com
  3. America’s Historical Newspapers, all three available at Dartmouth, as well as their extensive collection of books in print
  4. And for what they don’t have, there is the internet archive, which is another great resource.

cactus growing in the desert8. Where’s a favorite place you have traveled and where would you most like to travel to next?

I think one of my favorite places I’ve been is Copan, Honduras. It’s a really cute little town with cobblestone streets and home of the famous Mayan ruin site, and there’s a great museum. Someday I hope to go back there.

I collect National Parks; I’ve been to half, though they keep making new National Parks. I’m looking forward to when I can visit the 8 in Alaska; I haven’t been there yet.

9. What frivolous things do you miss about being out in the normal world?

Not frivolous, but freely traveling around New England on weekends visiting friends and family, and going out to eat and visiting museums. I love visiting museums. I was hoping to use the summer to visit some but that’s not going to happen. One of them is The Portland Museum of Art in Portland, Maine, as well as The Winslow Homer House that they own. 

 

This post was written by the Water Cooler Committee, Samara Cary, Paige Scudder, Elaina Vitale, and Samantha Wiebkin, for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Grant Writers Workshop Series: August 17th – September 25th, 2020 (Online via Zoom)

Grant Writers Workshop Series: August 17th – September 25th, 2020 (Online via Zoom)

Presented by GrantGPS and the Biomedical Libraries

Join us for this six-week series during which participants will receive practical instruction on writing NIH grants, with a focus on Specific Aims, Research Strategies, and Career Development Plans. The course will meet for one 2-hour session per week, alternating between didactic workshops and practical sessions for reviewing and critiquing participants’ proposals. This series is intended for anyone who is currently writing an NIH research or Career Development grant application.

For more information and to apply, visit dartgo.org/2020grantseries. Application closes August 7th.

This post was written by Amanda Scull, Head of Education and Information Services for the Biomedical Libraries.

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July 20th is National Lollipop Day!

Though the creators did not know it at the time, the original lollipop was likely created thousands of years ago by someone who was collecting honey from beehives with a stick. Since it’s creation, the lollipop has seen many different forms, whether it be candy or medicine. Several years ago, the lollipop took on a different form: lollipop moments.

In his TEDx talk (below), Drew Dudley Lollipop moments are a moment when someone said or did something that changed our lives and insists upon their importance. Dudley goes on to say that we need to redefine leadership so that we focus on creating, acknowledging, and saying thank you for lollipop moments.

While we wish we could share lollipops and their moments with you in person, we hope that everyone is staying safe and healthy. Thank you for all the lollipop moments that you have provided us over the years, we look forward to many more to come.

This post was written by Paige Scudder, Research and Education Librarian for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Getting to Know the Biomedical Libraries’ Staff: An interview with Stephanie Kerns

1. What is your job and how long have you worked for the Dartmouth Biomedical Libraries?

I’m the Director of the Biomedical Libraries, I have worked here for 2 years and 2 months.

2. What is your favorite part about your job?

That’s a hard one, there’s a lot I like about my job. First, I like everybody I work with. Everyone’s been really supportive; the staff at Biomed and everyone at Geisel. I think we have a really good team – I feel very lucky because we have a good team.
Secondly, I get to do a lot of the things that I like to do. Not just managing, but working with the budget: I love working with data and spreadsheets! I get to do things I geek out about.

two cats laying in front of a computer3. What is your least favorite part about your job?

Let’s see, I’m going to say I don’t like my “coworkers” getting in my way! I have no personal space in my current work environment! [See question 5 for details]

4. How are you spending your isolation?

I have cooked so much, cooking and baking, which isn’t unusual since I bake a lot anyways but being here all the time means I’m always watching the oven. Baking is bad right now because then I can’t share it and have to eat it myself.

cat sleeping on a notepadI’ve been lazy, I’m trying to get back on the exercise bandwagon so I’ve been better about running this past week. And I’m riding my bike a lot on the Rail Trail and out to Mascoma Lake and sitting by the water.

5. If you have any pets or kids, describe them as your co-worker and tell us what they are doing right now.

Max is sleeping on the job. He was invading my personal space prior to this. He then went to sit on top of Lola and licked her until she got sick of it and left in a huff. I need to file a grievance with HR.

homemade pizza with mushroom and cheese.6. What pantry meal are you proudest of?

I don’t know, let me think. Actually, last night I just made Summer Pasta with Zucchini, Ricotta, and Basil. It was in the New York Times Cooking app, it was fabulous. You know what, I make pizza at least once a week in the winter and every 2 weeks in the summer. It’s the Roberta’s Pizza Dough recipe also from the New York Times Cooking app.

7. What are you reading/watching during your isolation?

I signed up for Acorn TV because I love British crime dramas. I watch so many: Vera, Wallander, Hinterlands, Grantchester. I’ve also been watching Bosch, and Ozark, and rewatching Elementary, and Community – I love that show, I’ll watch it during my lunch break. Basically a mix of things that are new and old. Oh, and Watchmen.

I’ve got a few books going but I tend to watch more TV. Things Fall Apart, by Chinua Achebe; The Night Watchman, by Louise Erdrich; Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat, by Samin Nosrat.

8. What is your hobby? Name your top 5 (hobby-related) recommendations and why.

fried fish and asparagusCooking for sure:

  • Definitely go to farmers’ markets, or sign up for a CSA. Mine is from Root 5 Farm. Using local produce gives you access to food you’d never find in a grocery store. You find things you’ve never heard of, and it allows you to be adventurous in cooking.
  • Sharing. The reason why I got into cooking was to have a way to share, which is why it’s killing me that I can’t do that right now. I used to watch my Nana cook, that’s how I learned, it was a social thing where the output was food and who wouldn’t love that? Now I can only eat it myself. Always share in non-pandemic times, it’s part of a bigger whole… it’s hard to explain!
  • To learn, watch cooking shows. I grew up on PBS cooking shows like Julia Child and that kind of stuff. My mom wasn’t much of a cook, so watching shows is how I learned.
  • Cookbooks. Treat them as books, actually read them, not just the recipe part. You can learn a lot by reading them. Cooking is science, if you understand the underlying concepts then it becomes something that you can extrapolate from. Then you can experiment once you know flavors and be adventurous.
  • I don’t have a garden right now but I’d really like to grow plants. Having a garden would be nice to have.

a plate or cheese, olives and slices of bread9. Where’s a favorite place you have traveled and where would you most like to travel to next?

I’m going to continue with this food theme, I think I’m hungry! I went to Cinque Terre in Italy; a lot of it had to do with food. it’s beautiful, right on the Mediterranean. It’s where pesto and focaccia come from. Italy is all about food, you’ll eat dishes with 3 ingredients and it’s the most phenomenal thing you’ve had in your life.

I actually want to go to France. Weirdly I’ve never been to France even though I’ve taken 6 years of French! I want to eat all the cheese!

10. What frivolous things do you miss about being out in the normal world?

I don’t think this is frivolous, but seeing people, talking to people. I miss hugs! Yeah.

 

This post was written by the Water Cooler Committee, Samara Cary, Paige Scudder, Elaina Vitale, and Samantha Wiebkin, for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Biomedical Libraries Update: Checking Books Out

Patrons may now check out books from Matthews-Fuller Library (and any other Dartmouth Library) by signing in to their account and placing a hold on the item in our catalog.

Please note that at this time, all holds must be picked up at Baker-Berry Library on the Dartmouth College campus. 

Access to Baker-Berry is restricted to the back entrance into Novack Café and requires a Dartmouth College ID. DHMC patrons picking up holds should call the circulation desk when they arrive at the number posted on the door to Novack Café, and a staff member will come let them in. Please wait until you receive a hold pickup notice from the system to travel to campus to retrieve your item(s); instructions for access will also be included in that email.

Matthews-Fuller Library and Dana Library both remain closed at this time.

This post was written by Amanda Scull, Head of Education and Information Services for the Biomedical Libraries.

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New On Demand Workshop Series: Programming With Python

Have you been thinking about learning more about Python for data visualization? Get started with our new Programming with Python series. Over the course of 10 videos, learn how to visualize and analyze data, repeat actions with loops, create functions and more.

Before you can practice coding with us, you’ll need to install a python interpreter and download the lesson materials. Visit Dartgo.org/pythonsetup for instructions on how to obtain both.

For more information about the carpentry lessons used to create the tutorials, visit Dartgo.org/swcpython.

Finally, as we work through the lessons together, feel free to follow along by pausing the video or rewind to review a step.

 

This post was written by Paige Scudder, Research and Education Librarian for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Getting to Know the Biomedical Libraries’ Staff: An interview with Susan Jorgensen

Reading on a hamock1. What is your job and how long have you worked for the Dartmouth Biomedical Libraries?

I’m the Access Services Supervisor at Dana, and I’ve been here for 17 years. It’s the longest I’ve done anything. I started off at the Sherman Art Library at Dartmouth and worked there for 7 years, and then I worked for about 6 months in the Special Collections Library but it wasn’t dealing with people at all and I missed that.

2. What is your favorite part about your job?

I like most of my job, I like all of it really but I think getting to know the student workers. They all come from different backgrounds and are so interesting in their diversity, but they come here and have the same interests and goals. Some of them are really very funny!

3. What is your least favorite part about your job?

I guess the thing that gets under my skin is all the acronyms. Between the library, the college, and medical resources it can be a little much. There’s just so many of them, I need a spreadsheet! Someone should make a Jeopardy game with all the acronyms.

4. How are you spending your isolation?

I’ve been out on leave since the end of October, so I’m kind of an expert in isolation. It’s easier in the winter than it is in the summer when you want to be outside. You don’t feel like you’re missing out so much. The bird watching has been good, more than usual. I’ve been knitting, and doing my physical therapy exercises, which has been nice to do “while at work”; I spend my work time on the floor!

Koura 5. If you have any pets or kids, describe them as your co-worker and tell us what they are doing right now.

Well, let’s see. Koura is kind of a slacker, she sleeps on the job and is kind of manipulative. Don’t tell her I said that! She’ll turn her back on me for the whole day. It’s hard to criticize her though, she’s just so devoted, she’s always at my feet — what else can you ask for from a coworker?

She’s a rescue and has a really good life now.

6. What pantry meal are you proudest of?

Before it got hot I was having fun with sourdough. I had a sourdough starter that was dying a slow death in the back of my refrigerator. But it’s just too hot for baking now.

Then I discovered a huge stockpile of rice noodles in the back of the pantry. I don’t know what those are about but I’ve been working through them.

Tonight, we’re having asparagus, goat cheese, and noodles (wheat – not rice!). You throw the asparagus in the pot with the noodles. When it’s done you mix in the goat cheese, a little bit of water from the noodles, and a lot of fresh tarragon and lemon. It’s done in about 20 minutes and tastes really good. One pot.

7. What are you reading/watching during your isolation?

I binged Wallander with Kenneth Branagh, it’s very good. I like historical fiction, Tracy Chevalier is one of my favorite authors lately. I’ve also been thinking about reading The Decameron, which was inspired by isolation during the Black Death quarantine and written in the 1300s.

dyed yarn8. What is your hobby? Name your top 5 recommendations

I’m a total knitting nerd, I knit year round. I knit for family, friends, and charity. I knit as a form of therapy.

  1. Ravelry, it’s social networking at it’s finest. You can find so many great designers and patterns on there.
  2. Knitting with fun colors and designs.
  3. I make a lot of Latvian mittens, they have nice designs and traditional patterns.
  4. I like dying my own yarn with plant sources; black walnuts from Tuck Drive, Phragmites – which is an invasive weed that has no value for wildlife but can be used as dye, flowers from my garden, lichen from rocks. Dying with plants is a lot of fun, it’s fun to see what you can get.
  5. My favorite source book is Wild Color by Jenny Dean, it’s a good book and has great information about dyeing yarn. Great pictures too!

9. Where’s a favorite place you have traveled and where would you most like to travel to next?

I really do like going to Hawaii. I have family out there so I can stay busy. Where would I want to go to next… I’ve wanted to go to Norway since I was a teenager, it’s been on my list for a long time!

Facetiming with family10. What frivolous things do you miss about being out in the normal world?

I don’t know if you call visiting family frivolous, but I really do miss that. They don’t live around here, so it’s not like you can pop over and visit from afar. We use Family Crossings to stay in touch. You can share photos and chat with your family, we’ve been using it for about 10 years; it’s more private than Facebook.

 

This post was written by the Water Cooler Committee, Samara Cary, Paige Scudder, Elaina Vitale, and Samantha Wiebkin, for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Getting to Know the Biomedical Libraries’ Staff: An interview with David Sandberg

One of my favorite photos of one of my favorite memories. I went riding with my niece in Vermont, it was a great day. Goldy was a very bad horse though, he liked to bite the other horses.

1. What is your job and how long have you worked for the Dartmouth Biomedical Libraries?

I started at the Biomedical Libraries in November of 1992. It was during Bill Clinton’s first run for the White House. I was a Circulation Assistant. DHMC had just opened a year before.it was really miraculous when this big white glamorous building appeared in this field. Deer would be bouncing around in the parking lot. I remember watching the Clinton Inauguration on a TV in the library. I left seven months later and worked for private firms for 12 years – then returned in November of 2004. In 15 years I have worked on many projects at Dana and at Matthews Fuller. The most challenging was working on a large de-accession project. It was a huge project but rewarding. I’m currently an Information Access Assistant working at the Dana Biomedical Library.

2. What is your favorite part about your job?

Easy – working with medical students. They are all just really amazing people. It’s a privilege to help them when I can. They all have varied backgrounds and interests but they all want to be great doctors.

3. What is your least favorite part about your job?

Saying goodbye every year to folks who are moving on to their residencies or somewhere else. Odds are you never see them again. Sad but part of the cycle.

4. How are you spending your isolation?

I adopted a Maltese puppy in the first week of February. If you are going to be home quarantined then it’s great to be with a puppy. You will not be bored. Ever. Not a good time to be low on towel paper. I hit the absolute worst time to be low on paper products.

5. If you have any pets or kids, describe them as your co-worker and tell us what they are doing right now.

I have a 12-year-old Pekinese named Happy Ming who was a gift from my father. He went blind in April. I am his seeing-eye human. We are learning a new way to get him exercise and keep him cheerful. He gets lots of attention and TLC. He has always been hand-fed. The puppy is Dodger – he is asleep under my desk. Andromeda is my cat. She was hunting in the basement last night and is now asleep in her chair in the living room. She runs the house, no question about that.

6. What pantry meal are you proudest of?

I have zero interest in food. I never have. I eat the exact same meals every day 365 days a year. For breakfast it’s always just one hard egg, I only eat the white with toast. Happy gets the yolk. I seldom eat lunch. Dinner is always Boca Burger with vegetables, and some dessert. I just have no interest in food, I don’t know why. I do eat pizza on Friday nights, that is a treat.

7. What are you reading/watching during your isolation?

I am reading a biography of Lord Byron. He was the first modern celebrity. A great, larger than life-sized story. His lifetime was filled with similar celebrated folks – the Prince Regent comes to mind. Lady Caroline Lamb. Shelley. Great but not admirable individuals. Striving but not endearing people. The Regency was the birth of the modern. They were rebels, they broke a lot of conventions. It was Caroline Lamb who said of Bryon “Mad, bad, and dangerous to know.”

8. What is your hobby?

In the Fall of 1993 I decided to collect guidebooks to all of the world’s museums. Big and small. I own several thousand now. As well as a collection of seven hundred city maps and schematics. I have met fascinating people all around the world who went and bought guides for me. My favorite was from Tsaritsyno outside of Moscow. A new Russian friend got on the Metro and bought the guide for me one day. That was wonderful. Real magic.

The world is a big place with lots of good people. A lady in a bookstore in Lisbon went to the Ajuda Palace and got me the guidebook. It was almost impossible to get. I owe her so much. Then she went to Mafra and got me that palace guide, also. People are so generous and I am grateful to them. I always remember them years later when I look at the guides. My collection is the work of many hands. I have guides in many languages.

There are ten museums that I always have the current guide for: The Louvre, the Prado, the Uffizi, the Rijksmuseum, The Met, the Hermitage, the Vatican Museums, the Kunsthistoriches Museum, and the US and UK National Galleries. I was born in Boston so the MFA, too. The most beautiful museum guide is to the Queen Emma Summer palace in Honolulu. It’s small but so visually intimate. It’s in the hills above the city. My personal favorite guide is to the Cairo Museum – though most of the exhibits have been moved to the new Grand Egyptian Museum at the pyramids. There is no guide for the GEM right now. I am waiting. It’s been a real journey collecting these guides, I can go anywhere on a winter’s day by sitting down with these guides.

9. Where’s a favorite place you have traveled and where would you most like to travel to next?

Vienna. I just loved Vienna. I have been to Europe eight times. Vienna has a vibe like no other great city I have visited. I love the way Austrians speak German. The way they wait for pedestrian lights. Always. There is a sweet fatalism to Vienna. Der tod das muss ein Wiener sein = Death must be Viennese. The Viennese believe you must enjoy life while you can and the whole city is a celebration of all things beautiful and dynamic.

I loved the hum of the Ringstrasse at night near the Hofburg. Mozart died young. I remember his apartment on Domgasse my first night in the city and I loved it. I walked through his rooms near the Cathedral and was amazed by the ambience of the spaces. Vienna is all about enjoying this moment in time. Appreciating how wonderful things are and also how fleeting they can be. It also has Sacher torte, the best chocolate cake in the world. I am hoping to go to Berlin in 2021 or 2022 when the Museum Island fully reopens. I would also like to visit the palace ensemble at Potsdam.

10. What frivolous things do you miss about being out in the normal world?

Bookstores. Cones at McDonalds, I’m utterly addicted to them, it’s like my curse, I have to limit myself to one or two a week. Movies!

 

This post was written by the Water Cooler Committee, Samara Cary, Paige Scudder, Elaina Vitale, and Samantha Wiebkin, for the Biomedical Libraries.

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Getting to Know the Biomedical Libraries’ Staff: An interview with Samantha Wiebkin

Sam (right) and her friend Ana at The Huntington

1. What is your job and how long have you worked for the Dartmouth Biomedical Libraries?

I’ve been working at Matthews-Fuller since the end of February as an Information Access Assistant. Kind of wild to think that I’ve now worked the majority of my time for Biomed remotely.

2. What is your favorite part about your job?

Definitely helping patrons find the information they need or showing them a service they didn’t know they could access. It’s so rewarding to be able to help someone and they’re usually really appreciative.

3. What is your least favorite part about your job?

Since I’m still fairly new to Biomed, I would say my lack of experience and knowledge. I feel like there is a lot more to learn and retain, it can be daunting at times.

Gouache painting from an early spring walk

4. How are you spending your isolation?

I just started my first semester of grad school, so I have plenty of homework! But besides staring endlessly at a computer screen, I’ve been getting outside as much as possible. I discovered I can connect to my WiFi from the backyard, so working out in the sun has been really nice and going for lots of walks/runs. I’m getting reacquainted with riding a bike, which is equal parts terrifying and amusing. I’ve also been painting quite a bit, doing frustrating 1000 piece puzzles, and playing an embarrassing amount of Animal Crossing: New Horizons.

5. If you have any pets or kids, describe them as your co-worker and tell us what they are doing right now.

My coworker is currently yelling in a distressed manner over the fact that I haven’t let him into the room where I’m working.

the screaming co-worker had a birthday (Sam’s cat)

6. What pantry meal are you proudest of?

Ginger ramen. We cook most nights but I think this is the dish we’ve recreated repeatedly and can’t get enough of it. Tons of freshly grated ginger and chili garlic sauce. We usually put broccoli, water chestnuts, scallions, mushrooms, and chicken in but I honestly think anything would taste good in it!

7. What are you reading/watching during your isolation?

I’m a little embarrassed by the number of books I’m in-process of reading but actively as of right now I’m reading The Soul of an Octopus: A Surprising Exploration into the Wonder of Consciousness by Sy Montgomery and The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes by Suzanne Collins. As for what I’m watching, I’ve just finished rewatching Avatar: The Last Airbender and am now rewatching Legend of Korra.

8. What is your hobby? Name your top 5 (hobby-related) recommendations and why. ie- Gardening, names 5 plants.

It feels a little weird to call art a hobby but when I’m not working that’s usually what I’m doing instead. I bounce around to different mediums to keep things interesting. My recommendations for some art-making activities would include:

  1. Making Comics by Lynda Barry – a gem of a book full of fun exercises and prompts for (surprise) making comics!
  2. The Art Assignment YouTube channel – has a great variety of videos if you want to learn about art history, contemporary artists, or participate in art assignments.
  3. Collaging – perfect for people like me who have random old magazines and books laying around. I also recommend incorporating found objects (feathers, leaves, thread, an untouched bottle of glitter you didn’t know you had) to add some 3D flare!
  4. Instagram art challenges – there are so many great drawing challenges and artists to follow. One of my favorites is the #drawthisinyourstyle challenge where one artist makes an original piece and then invites anyone who wants to to redraw it. I just finished an art challenge where I drew six fictional characters in my style.
  5. Master copies – I used to absolutely hate doing copies of masters’ work for undergrad but I’ve found the value in them now (my color theory professor would be so proud). It kind of makes you appreciate the artist’s perspective and try to look at things with their eyes when it comes to color and light.

9. Where’s a favorite place you have traveled and where would you most like to travel to next?

I think any place I’ve gone with my best friend would be my favorite, but most recently being The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California when I was visiting in February. It was absolutely stunning and the perfect day but we didn’t have time to see everything and I would love to go back to explore more. I think next on my travel list would have to be the Grand Canyon or The Redwood National Park.

10. What frivolous things do you miss about being out in the normal world?

Eating out at restaurants and not having my glasses constantly fog up while wearing a mask.

 

This post was written by the Water Cooler Committee, Samara Cary, Paige Scudder, Elaina Vitale, and Samantha Wiebkin, for the Biomedical Libraries.

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